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wireless connection drops


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#1
lork3rr

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I have a Belkin Wireless N USB network adapter and a Belkin Wireless N Router F5D8235 connected to a Speadstream 5100 modem. I recently switched from a Linksys WRT54G router when I built my new computer. I have a Dell Dimension 8400 (Windows XP) connected directly to the router and my xbox 360 is connected to the router as well. My new computer (windows 7) is upstairs, directly above the router and gets a constant four-five bar signal. I was downloading a game from Steam, and i noticed that the dl speed would drop to almost zero, and then go back up to normal. I ran a ping test, pinging www.google.com and after every 50-100 pings, it says request timed out 2-3 times, and then it goes back to normal. If i am gaming on my wireless PC or my Xbox, it will occassionaly disconnect my or i will suffer from massive lag.

Edited by lork3rr, 13 March 2010 - 11:17 AM.

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#2
==SpuD==

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This could be caused my conflicting wireless devices nearby in neighbours houses. If you have access to log on to your routers configuration page, i would recommend changing to channel off of the default one.

Download and install http://www.netstumbler.com/downloads/
This program will scan and find any other wireless networks around and give you information on them such as what channel they're using.
Try to choose a channel as far away from others for best performance.

Josh
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#3
lork3rr

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yea, i tried that and switched it to channel 5 or 3, i don't remember, but i still have the problem. I noticed that it also happens on the computer connected directly to the router. could it just be my internet?
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#4
==SpuD==

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there are a number of factors it could be. It could be the quality of your telephone line, your distance from the exchange, or the number of people using the same exchange as you.
Did it happen when you were using your old router?

Also, to test weather as you believe it is your line or not go to http://www.pingtest.net/ and run that test. This will test the jitter, packet loss and ping of your line. Post back your 'grade' when you get one.

Here is a list of information on each 'grade'

Understanding Your Line Quality

We give each test result a grade to help you interpret the overall quality. We also show the specific packet loss, ping and jitter values that make up your grade. When we are unable to measure one or more of them you will see a grade of N/A. Certain firewall configurations, Java not being installed or other technical issues can cause this, but it is possible that simply testing again will fix the problem. Feel free to test often, and read on to learn more!


A
An excellent result! Expect all Internet applications to work very well assuming you have sufficient bandwidth. Use Speedtest.net to see.
MOS greater than 4.37 (Example - a ping below 50 ms with 0% packet loss)
B
Very good! Your connection should work well for any Internet application. Some online games may not perform optimally.
MOS between 4.28 and 4.37 (Example - a ping around 90 ms with 0% packet loss)
C
Acceptable. Your VoIP quality will suffer some, and you will have a disadvantage in many online games. Most streaming media will be fine. You should try testing again to another server close to you.
MOS between 4.00 and 4.27 (Example - a ping around 150 ms with 1% packet loss)
D
Concerning. Most online applications will not perform well but should function in some capacity. Try testing to other servers to verify the result. You might need to contact your ISP for help.
MOS between 2.50 and 3.99 (Example - a ping around 300 ms with 3% packet loss)
F
Very poor. Real-time Internet application performance will suffer greatly on such a connection. Test to other servers to confirm the result, but definitely talk to your ISP about troubleshooting the issue.
MOS lower than 2.50 (Example - a ping above 500 ms with 20% packet loss)


for futher information visit http://www.pingtest....learn.php#grade

josh
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#5
lork3rr

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thank you, that was very enlightening. i got an F with the packet loss at 72%, the ping at 179, and the jitter at 55. Then i got a D with a packet loss of zero, but with a similar ping and a jitter of 88. i don't think this happened with my old router, but i am not too sure. i am not sure if this is related, but when i check my wireless status on my computer it say the IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity and it will either say IPv4 internet and IPv6 no internet access, or vice versa.
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#6
==SpuD==

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Well looking at the results you have got, this does seem to show that your line could be a contributing factor. You should possibly try and contact your ISP and see if they can do anything about it.

Although this could be a big factor it could still be something with the router set up or the router itself. Have you tried switching back to your old router again to see if the problem persists with that?
I don't think the IPv4 or 6 is anything to worry about. This is just the protocol being used.

for more information on this take a look at http://www.whatismyip.com/

Static IP: One that is fixed and never changes. This is in contrast to a dynamic IP which may change at any time. Most ISP's a single static IP or a block of static IP's for a few extra bucks a month.

IP version 4: Currently used by most network devices. However, with more and more computers accessing the internet, IPv4 IPs are running out quickly. Just like in a city, addresses have to be created for new neighborhoods but, if your neighborhood gets too large, you will have to come up with an entire new pool of addresses. IPv4 is limited to 4,294,967,296 IPs.

IP version 5: This is an experimental protocol for UNIX based systems. In keeping with standard UNIX (a computer Operating System) release conventions, all odd-numbered versions are considered experimental. It was never intended to be used by the general public.

IP version 6: The replacement for the aging IPv4. The estimated number of unique IPs for IPv6 is 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 or 2^128.

The old and current standard of IPs was this: 192.168.100.100 the new way can be written different ways but means the same and are all valid:

* 1080:0000:0000:0000:0000:0034:0000:417A

* 1080:0:0:0:0:34:0:417A

* 1080::34:0:417A


Josh
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#7
lork3rr

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I have tried contacting them about previous phone/internet problems and they say that if it is a problem inside my house, then it would cost around $60 for the first half hour, and then around $80 every 15 minutes, so i would only do that as a last resort. I have thought about upgrading my internet package because I am currently only paying for AT&T's basic internet package with download speeds maxing at 750kbps, but mine only reach around 75kbps, when my internet is working. I have not tried switching to my old router, which is a linksys WRT54G because I am in school and dont have a lot of time to set it up. Plus I dont think my wireless adapter works with the router. I have a week off of school in April for Easter, so I can try then. But i can definitely try calling my ISP again to see if they have any information. If you think of anything else, or if you need more information, please let me know.
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#8
==SpuD==

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yeah that is a rather extortionate amount. you could try asking them to check your line, and say that your getting appalling speeds. they will try to give you some rubbish about being far away from an exchange ect but even so it should not be that bad! that has defiantly got to be a problem there end. Just out of curiosity, do you live in a town / city or the country side?
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#9
lork3rr

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I live in a small town of about 10,000 people. We are surrounded by other towns and they're large towns and small cities nearby. I am about two hours away from New York, so I dont really live in a rural area, which is why I am perplexed about my download speeds. I feel like I am still using dial-up.
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#10
==SpuD==

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you should defiantly contact them about that, or try to change providers if things don't improve!
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