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CPU Fan customize?


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#1
eikone

eikone

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I'm trusting that the motto I've seen on this forum, "there are no dumb questions", is true. I'm working on my first build. I have all the components in my case expect for the custom lighting and extra fans. Nothing is hooked up yet, just placed, so of course I haven't started it up yet.

Basic system is; MOBO ASUS P6T, Intel Core i7 920, CPU Cooler Dark Knight.

What I want to do is switch out the standard Xigma fan that came with the Dark Knight for an Antec TriCool 120mm LED (tri-color) fan.

I have several questions on how (and if) I can do this. Here's a copy of the online install instruction:

1. Connect to a non-variable power connector only. For best performance, Antec recommends that LED fans only be connected to a standard (steady-voltage) 12V DC power connector. If your motherboard or power supply supports fan speed control, DO NOT connect the LED fan to that variable-voltage header or output.

2. The LED fan comes equipped with a 3-pin power connector. It also includes a 4-pin power connector adapter (installed) with power pass-through feature. To connect to a motherboard header, remove the adapter and use the 3-pin connector. To connect to your power supply, leave the adapter attached and plug the 4-pin connector into an available connector. You may plug another device into the other side of the adapter connector and power it, so you don't lose a power plug with the LED fan.

3. The LED fan supports fan speed monitoring through the 3-pin connector. If you choose to connect the LED fan to your power supply but your motherboard supports fan speed monitoring, you may connect the signal wire adapter (3-pin connector with only one wire) to your motherboard header. The fan speed signal wire does not need to be connected for the LED fan to function properly.

Questions:
#1) Do I need to remove the speed control switch. It is wired directly to the fan. Would I just use wire cutters and snip wires,...where?, close to the housing or right at the motor? Do I need to cap the wires or something?

#2) Since it does have 3 speeds, if it is connected to the cpu fan header on the mobo, will the speed be automatically regulated according to the cpu needs?

#3) The Dark Knight is only configured to hold one fan but I'd like to attached the other fan (that came with it) to the other side for a push/pull airflow. I believe I can find a way to attach it but how should I power it? Could I (or should I) get a 3-pin "Y" adapter to plug both fans to the same cpu fan header, and if I do this how might this affect the speed controls of both fans?

Also, I do have a temp/fan controller (Lian Li Mod.#TR-3) for up to 3 fans. I will have 7 fans (not counting the cpu fans) running, 2-140mm bottom intake, 1-140 front intake in front of the HDD cage w/ a second 120mm mounted on the opposite side of the cage pulling air through, 1-140 and 1-120mm top and 1-120mm rear exhaust fans. I'm trying to decide the best way to configure these fans possibly using 3-pin "y" adapters so that they can all be connected to the fan controller.

Thanks for any help!
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#2
Neil Jones

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1) No. The instructions say do not connect to any take-off that has the ability to control speeds. If this is not possible then disable the fan throttling option in the BIOS. The reason for this is the lights don't work properly if the fan speed is throttled. That's all. You don't need to "remove" anything.

2) There is nothing you've listed that says anything about three speeds. Fan speeds are controlled by the board if you set the appropriate options for it.

3) Most boards have more than one fan take-off on the board. Failing that most fans have the ability to be connected directly to the 4 pin molexes from the power supply. The only disadvantage of this is that they will run constantly at full speed.

Do consider whether you actually need 7 fans. The vast majority of cases only need the fan in the power supply, the CPU cooling fan and a case fan extracting air, plus any that's present on the graphics card. Too many extra fans will make the computer incredibly noisy and it'll sound like a hovercraft and it'll be as good as not having any fans at all.

Edited by Neil Jones, 18 March 2010 - 04:26 PM.

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#3
eikone

eikone

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Thanks for replying. I was beginning to think that my questions were too dumb to answer. :)

As far as the speed control switch that's on the fan, it is on a wire about 4-5 inches long and I don't know what to do with it. If I leave it, what speed setting should it be switched to? Do I try to mount it so that it is accessible or just try to hide it?
The Xigma fan also has LEDs so shouldn't either fan work about the same?
I know that 7 fans may seem like a bit overkill but I do want to run a cool, stable system.
Here's a more complete system list:
MOBO - ASUS P6T
PSU - 660w Kingwin Premium Series
CPU - Intel Core i7 920
CPU Cooler - Dark Knight
RAM - 6GB OCZ DDR3 Gold
HDD - 1TB WD Caviar Black
SSD - 60GB OCZ
GPU - ATI Radeon HD5870 1GB
HDTV Card - Hauppuage Win TV-HVR 1600
Lian Li 3.5 LCD Thermometer & Fan Controller
Optical Drive - SAMSUNG Super-WriteMaster SH-S223
(will soon be adding a Blu-ray Disc writter)
System is housed in a Thermaltake XaserVI case that I have done some modding to.
Also have external 640GB WD MyBook Storage, LG Super-Multi DVD writter and
my HP w2408 24 inch LCD Monitor.

I don't like the placement of the single stock fan in the top of the case. It's located under the center solid portion of the top sliding panel between the mesh vent inserts, but a second fan can be installed just under the front mesh insert allowing for better heat exhaust. The second fan on the inside of the HDD cage is a real necessity but I think I will place a second front intake fan just above the HDD cage and under the optical drives. This will provide air flow directly toward the memory cards and CPU cooler. The other front fan is in front of the HDD cage. The 2 bottom intake fans help to cool both the TV tuner and very large GPU and of course there is the one rear exhaust fan.

I may add a second GPU in the future (when I can afford it) and additional HDD and/or SSD as needed.
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#4
eikone

eikone

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Well, I guess I'm going to be going this pretty much alone. :) I was really hoping to get a little more feedback here. I see there have been quite a few viewers, but only one reply (other than my own).
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