Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Checksum error


  • Please log in to reply

#1
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 20,000 posts
Hi to all at GeeksToGo
I have acquired a foxconn 661 MXPro mobo that will not save the cmos settings.
When booting up a checksum error message is displayed + press F1 to continue or F8 to enter setup.
I have done the obvious & replaced the cmos battery + entered & saved new settings but with no luck,
when I press F10 to save the new settings the system reboots & shows the new settings but after a
complete power down the new settings are lost again.
I would like to ask if a bios flash would fix this or is a new bios chip required?
Thank you in advance
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
I doubt a flash would help. I would suspect a damaged CMOS chip and you could probably correct that easiest with a new motherboard.

BUT - do make sure no one left a jumper block across the two CMOS Reset pins.
  • 0

#3
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Topic Starter
  • Technician
  • 20,000 posts
Thanks for your quick reply Digerati, your answer was as I thought it would be.
If I try a flash & it turns out to be a damaged CMOS chip I havn`t lost anything by it,
as for the CMOS pins 1st thing I checked was the cap was on pins 2&3,I will try the flash
tommorow & post back the outcome,
Thanks again
  • 0

#4
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

If I try a flash & it turns out to be a damaged CMOS chip I havn`t lost anything by it,

That's absolutely right - it sure can't hurt to try.

If there is any data on the drive, you might want to pull the drive and attach it to another computer via an enclosure, or installed as a secondary drive, then copy the data over.

Sorry I don't have any better advice. Keep us posted.
  • 0

#5
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Topic Starter
  • Technician
  • 20,000 posts
Well this update will sound a bit of a mystery! I changed the jeantech psu out & put in one that I keep as a spare & the hd wasn`t being detected! so I powered down disconnected the main power lead, removed & replaced the hd ribbon, used one of the spare molex power connectors for the hd, replaced the main power lead & switched back on & left the room for a few moments, I expected to return & find the checksum error on the screen, but the computer had booted successfully, including the correct time & windows was installing automatic updates,previously as soon as the main power was turned off the CMOS was lost.
I will post back with an update after work tommorow & hopefully be able to report the problem as being resolved.
Many thanks again Digerati for your assisstance
  • 0

#6
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
The ATX Form Factor standard requires all ATX PSUs (which is just about all PC PSUs) to provide +5Vsb standby voltage across several points on the motherboard whenever the computer is shutdown, and the PSU is simply plugged in (and if present, the master power switch on the back of the PSU is set to on). Some motherboards use this keep power on the CMOS (required for CMOS to retain its data) to reduce drain on the battery. Perhaps the Jeantech PSU was not providing that.
  • 0

#7
happyrock

happyrock

    Tech Moderator

  • Retired Staff
  • 9,285 posts
Typically a jumper will be found across pins #1 and #2 as the default position, and by shutting the computer down, unplugging the power cord and then moving the jumper so that it is across pins #2 and #3 will clear the Bios/CMOS settings...
try moving the jumper to pins 1 & 2
  • 0

#8
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

Typically a jumper will be found across pins #1 and #2

That depends on the board. Some boards have no jumpers by default. Some you momentarily move a jumper from one pair to another. Many new motherboards are coming with CMOS reset buttons :) - and some have the reset buttons on the back panel! :) :)

My point, I don't believe there is a "typical" setup, and I recommend reading the motherboard manual.
  • 0

#9
happyrock

happyrock

    Tech Moderator

  • Retired Staff
  • 9,285 posts
in post number 3 he says the jumper is on pins 2 & 3...
I guess we will just have to wait and see if my advice works or not
  • 0

#10
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
:) Sorry 'bout that.
  • 0

Advertisements


#11
123Runner

123Runner

    Member 4k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,305 posts
I am a bit confused on this because since phillpower2 had previously replaced the cmos battery with a new one, then the computer should have retained the settings irregardless of a possible psu not having the 5vdc to reduce drain on the battery. This all since it is a very short duration of time (unless the new cmos battery was not a "good" battery)

I find this odd since everything suggested is the proper steps (except the psu). Usually (as suggested), the resolution would then be as Digerati suggested a damaged cmos chip which would then be the main board issue.


123runner
  • 0

#12
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
It is odd - for the reasons you mention. If there is a short somewhere in the battery circuit, it could cause the battery's charge to drop below the threshold needed to hold the CMOS data. That's a guess, however.
  • 0

#13
123Runner

123Runner

    Member 4k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,305 posts
Thanks
I was just wanting to be sure because I have had this issue on some work computers that I know no-one touches. I replaced the battery on some and we are good. I had to replace a cpu board on another and we are good. The board has no jumpers so that is out of the picture and 5vdc is good.

123runner
  • 0

#14
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

The board has no jumpers

Do you mean it has no CMOS reset jumpers? In that case, to reset, you need to power down, unplug from the wall, discharge static to bare metal, then pull the battery for 15-30 seconds.
  • 0

#15
123Runner

123Runner

    Member 4k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,305 posts
Yes Digerati.

Been there and done it. Actually I am required to use a ground strap. (company rules)
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP