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USB Power Supply Pack - how universal?


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#1
rob2xx2

rob2xx2

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Hi,

I have a Samsung USB Power Supply Pack for my camera. It plugs into a mains socket on the wall, then to the camera via a Samsung cable. The cable connnects to the power pack via a USB series A socket (just visible in the lower right of the picture in the link). At least it looks like a USB-A socket; and the cable can also be used to connect the camera as an external USB drive to the laptop.

My question is: does the USB standard cover this kind of device/power supply so that any device that I could charge by plugging it into a USB socket on my computer would be compliant with the camera power supply pack? For example I have a small MP3 player that I recharge by plugging into the USB socket on my laptop. Could I safely plug it into the camera power pack? What about other devices?

Thanks for advice.

Rob
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#2
Samm

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Hi Rob

Not come across one of these power packs before, but I would imagine that so long as the output voltage of the power pack is correct for the USB device, then it should be ok (or at least, not do any damage).

I'm assuming here that your camera can also be charged from a USB port on a computer (via the same connection on the camera). If so, then the output voltage of the power pack should match that of a computers USB port i.e. 5V. It should state the voltage on the power pack itself though, so check.

The only other consideration, is the output current. Computer USB ports can output up to about 500mA per port.

Edited by Samm, 02 April 2010 - 05:55 PM.

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#3
rob2xx2

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Hi Samm,

Thanks for the info/suggestions.

you wrote:
>" It should state the voltage on the power pack itself though, so check."

Yes, of course it does: why didn't I loook for that.

(Smacks forehead violently). (Blushes)

I just examined the pack and there is a label. To be fair to myself it's tiny and I did - literally - need a magnifying glass to read that it provides 4.2V ... 400mA.

>"I'm assuming here that your camera can also be charged from a USB port on a computer (via the same connection on the camera)"

Yes, this is so, and this gave me a lot of confidence that it would be multi-purpose; however I did want to double-check before putting my (partner's) MP3 player in.

Thanks again.

No smoke from the MP3 player so far. :-)

Rob
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#4
123Runner

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You are a little below the average spec

need a magnifying glass to read that it provides 4.2V ... 400mA.

which is better to be below than above.
If you charged at more voltage and amperage, you would charge faster, but could burn the device out.
You are good to go.
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