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Need Help- Removing CPU and Heatsink


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#1
gold384

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well, this is the story guys: i want to remove the cpu from the mobo since it will no longer transmit video properly. trouble is, how to do it? the cpu is glued with thermal grease to the heatsink. plus, the socket lever that locks the into place is sort of well covered by the heatsink. so i would have trouble removing that part.

i bet you guys see what i'm saying- i hope!! :)

so how do i get the cpu out of there besides using a hammer on the mobo, which i don't want to do since the cpu is still good. :)

there has to be way?
thanks

specs:
cpu- amd phenom x3 2.4 ghz
mobo- asus m41785-m
heatsink- scythe scsk-1100 shuriken
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#2
Ferrari

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I know exactly what you are talking about and you probably won't like my answer. :)

I've dealt with many P4 systems like this and you just have to unlatch the heatsink and pull as gently as possible. Sometimes the CPU stays in the socket, sometimes it remains glued to the bottom of heatsink. When the latter happens, there is good chance you can bend the pins on the CPU, so try to pull straight up. If the system allows, let it run for about 15 minutes to hopefully soften the thermal paste.

Sometimes I wiggle it a bit while the cpu is still in the socket to hopefully break the heatsink and cpu apart. Make sure not to raise up while you do this or you will bend the pins on the cpu.

If the CPU sticks to the heatsink, slightly take a screwdriver or better yet a plastic flat edge and pry the CPU off the heatsink. That's the only way it can be done as far as I know. :) Just be careful. :)

EDIT: And if you do bend the pins, let me know, because there is a trick with a razor blade that can often bend them back into place fairly well. Real rocket science, I know. :)

Edited by Ferrari, 10 April 2010 - 08:24 AM.

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#3
gold384

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well, i removed the heatsink. it was easy- i used thermal glue and thought, awww man, this really sucks cause now the fan and cpu are stuck together. well as it turns out the thermal paste did'nt set, it was still wet....after 3 weeks?!!!! What the....

good for me though, it was easdy to get the cpu out. just wiped the white glue garbage off. huge thanks ferrari though!!! your answer was really good- i'm just glad i got off easy.
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#4
Ferrari

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it was still wet....after 3 weeks?!!!! What the....

It can remain moist like or "gooey" for quite sometime. Even years. Other systems I've seen it hard as a rock and you can just chip the gunk off of the CPU. I think some of it depends on the exact kind of paste you use, and exactly how hot the CPU was getting.

And just to be clear... an FYI: It's not really glue per se'. It is just a thermal compound to help transfer the heat from the CPU to the Heatsink. It's sole purpose it to just fill in microscopic imperfections of the CPU and Heatsink surfaces. This allows for maximum surface contact which in turn allows for better heat dissipation. The surfaces may look smooth, but under a microscope it would look like a rough terrain, almost like grass. Thermal compound fills all of that in and makes it perfectly smooth. That's why you just need a very very thin layer, anything more is unneeded... you are really just dealing with things on a microscopic scale.

your answer was really good- i'm just glad i got off easy.

Thank you, and you are very welcome. Glad it worked out for you. :)

Edited by Ferrari, 10 April 2010 - 08:52 AM.

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#5
rshaffer61

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Make sure before reinstalling you put a little pea size amount of thermal paste back on the cpu before sitting the heatsink back on it. You'll be fine then. Good jobs Ferrari and great advice.
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#6
Digerati

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There is such a thing a thermal adhesive and it is used on smaller ICs to glue the heat sink to the device when there is no clamping assembly. But CPU heat sinks are clamped on, so thermal adhesive should never be used on CPUs.

That said, some thermal interface materials do stick pretty good on their own - once cured they seal. Usually, if you run the computer for a few minutes, assuming it runs, the TIM will soften with the heat, and the seal will break much easier.
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