Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Unmountable Boot Volume


  • Please log in to reply

#16
happyrock

happyrock

    Tech Moderator

  • Retired Staff
  • 9,285 posts

Hi Alzeimer,

I went to run the chkdsk last night but there isn't a /f switch as daeemann suggested. There is only /P and /R. I'm thinking I should use /R. Is that correct?

Thanks,

Nancy

when you use the /r switch it implies /f too...FYI...always use the /r switch
  • 0

Advertisements


#17
happyrock

happyrock

    Tech Moderator

  • Retired Staff
  • 9,285 posts
first a little general info...
MFT... Describes all files on the volume, including file names, timestamps, stream names, and lists of cluster numbers where data streams reside, indexes, security identifiers, and file attributes like "read only", "compressed", "encrypted", etc.
MFTMirr is a Duplicate of the first vital entries of $MFT, usually 4 entries (4 KB).
TestDisk will use the MFTMirr to rewrite the MFT...
The first sector of NTFS partitions is reserved for the partition boot sector. This contains the information that allows the OS to read the partition. Without it, the partition cannot be accessed.

NTFS keeps a backup copy of the boot sector on the last sector of the partition which can allow recovery programs to restore it. The FAT equivalent of this is also called the boot sector, and resides on the first sector of the partition. The difference is that FAT does not keep a backup copy of this information, making recovery much more difficult...
this is in addition to the other advantage of using NTFS..so you can see you really should use the NTFS instead of FAT

The first file stored on an NTFS partition is the Master File Table(MFT) which is essentially a listing of the names, properties and locations of all the other files in the partition. This is referenced by the operating system to access individual files.

NTFS stores a backup copy of this file. Data restoration software will attempt to access or restore a copy of the MFT in order to access files on the partition.

If the MBR or partition table are damaged, the drive will become unbootable, and may appear to be blank if the partition information has been erased.

TESTDISK will attempt to access and restore a copy of the MFT in order to access files on the partition.

  • Please download the Ultimate Boot CD here.
  • Please burn the file to a CD using a ISO burner. (If you do not have a ISO burner you can get one Here)
  • Please boot to the CD using the disk you just burned.
  • Press enter to boot to the disk when prompted.
  • Using the up and down arrow keys select File System Tools.
  • Select Partition Tools.
  • Select TestDisk
  • Let it load do not press anything until you get to the screen that says at the top:
    TestDisk 6.6 Data Recovery Utility
  • Unless you have more then one hard drive installed take the default option and press enter to proceed.
  • Due to you are on a PC select Intel and press enter.
  • Select analyze
  • The next screen will display the current partition structure. If your System shows anything but No partition is bootable please post back with what it says.
  • Click Enter to Proceed.
  • The next screen is where TestDisk will analyze your disk.
  • After that it will come back with the results. It should show. Under Partition NTFS. With a Star Indicating Primary Bootable.
  • Press enter to continue.
  • Use the Left and Right arrow keys to select write.
  • Type Y and press enter to confirm.
  • Remove the disk.
  • Restart your computer.

Edited by happyrock, 22 April 2010 - 05:58 PM.

  • 0

#18
Troy

Troy

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 8,839 posts
Also you should be running a hard drive diagnostic. Have a look at the drive and it will tell you what make it is, e.g. Western Digital, Seagate, Samsung, Hitachi, etc... Then head to the manufacturer's website where you can download and burn a diagnostic CD, boot up off that and run both the quick and full tests.

My money is on the drive needing to be replaced.
  • 0

#19
daeemann

daeemann

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts
Oops, sorry about that. Yes no /f switch in recovery console, only in windows. My bad.

I agree with Troy about the drive. I think it's damaged, but hey it could just be corrupted data. You can always try fixmbr as long as you're absolutely sure this issue was not caused by a virus and you don't have a recovery partition set up by a OEM manufacturer.

Edited by daeemann, 23 April 2010 - 11:22 PM.

  • 0

#20
ngacsi

ngacsi

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
Hi Alzeimer,

I know it's been a long time since I visited this post. This computer wasn't in dire need during the summer but now that school is back in session it has become necessary to be able to use it. Picking up where I left off, I had to run the chkdsk /r two more times before it didn't find any errors. It has now run to completion without reporting any errors. What is the next step?

I hope to hear from you soon.


Thanks & Regards,

Nancy


Volume created 07/23/07 12:33a
The volume Serial Number is 0813-cc36
CHKDSK is checking the volume . . .
CHKDSK is performing additional checking or recovery . . .
CHKDSK is performing additional checking or recovery . . .
CHKDSK is performing additional checking or recovery . . .
CHKDSK has finished checking the volume.
78140128 kilobytes total disk space.
27358660 kilobytes are available.

4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
19535032 total allocation units on disk.
6839665 allocation units available on disk.
  • 0

#21
rshaffer61

rshaffer61

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 34,114 posts
Run hard drive diagnostics: http://www.tacktech....ay.cfm?ttid=287
Make sure, you select tool, which is appropriate for the brand of your hard drive.
Depending on the program, it'll create bootable floppy, or bootable CD.
If downloaded file is of .iso type, use ImgBurn: http://www.imgburn.com/ to burn .iso file to a CD (select "Write image file to disc" option), and make the CD bootable.

NOTE. If your hard drive is made by Toshiba, unfortunately, you're out of luck, because Toshiba doesn't provide any diagnostic tool.

Thanks to Broni for the instructions
  • 0

#22
ngacsi

ngacsi

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
Thank You. I will try this and post back the results.

Nancy
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP