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Dell laptop fell and broke


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#1
krpa-d-em

krpa-d-em

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My friend has a Dell Inspiron 1525 laptop which recently fell down a flight of stairs and will not boot up. The screen is broken. When attempting to boot up, there are two quick beeps.

Is there anyway to retrieve any of the lost data on this laptop?

Thank you for any help you may give.
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#2
Tpneer2

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the 2 beeps signify that the RAM is either out of its slot or the hard drive has slipped out of its pinset into the slots on the board
take the back off or if not comfortable with this take it to the shop and have them check these 2 things if they are out of place replace them and reboot
if it fires up in safe mode with networking go ahead and move the files to another drive or if they are really big send them to your self by using this link

www.yousendit.com

the service sends files from a pc to a server and a link to that file via email, then you have 7 days to retreive them or lsee them
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#3
phillipcorcoran

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Provided that the hard drive has survived the impact, you can remove it and mount in inside a 2.5-inch external enclosure which you connect to a mains supply then simply plug it into a spare USB port on a working computer.

You'll know if it's survived the impact if the disk can be read by the operating system. If it can't your only option then is to send it to a data-retrieval company who have special equipment that can read the data on the actual platters after disassembly of the drive. It's not cheap though, so it's only worth going down that route if it's really vital to get the data off it.
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