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help understanding strange IP


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#1
eradic8

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I am not very up on IP addresses, but I have noticed that my IP address has changed to a totally different set of numbers than I have ever seen before. The IP address begins 2.99.**.*** Can someone please tell me why all of a sudden I have been allocated an addresss that begins 2.99
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#2
SpywareDr

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FWIW, IP addresses from 2.96.0.0 through 2.103.255.255 are registered to "Opal Telecommunications Internet Service Provider" in Manchester, United Kingdom. opaltelecom.co.uk
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#3
dsenette

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the IPs you're used to seeing are IPv4 addresses. the address you have is still an IPv4 address it's just not in the normal 192.168 range that people expect most frequently...the 192.168 block is reserved for private networking, and will never be seen on the public network (internet). most people are familiar with this block because it's what home routers and most home modems give out to the internal networks (LANs), it seems as though you are directly connected to your internet connection device (modem or what not) and not connected to a router. it's a bit odd that your computer itself would have this address though. even DSL/Cable modems tend to give out a private IP on the INSIDE. when you say you've got this address, how are you finding that out? ipconfig or whatsmyip.com (or similar)?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4
the important bit for what you're talking about:

IPv4 uses 32-bit (four-byte) addresses, which limits the address space to 4,294,967,296 (232) possible unique addresses. However, some are reserved for special purposes such as private networks (~18 million addresses) or multicast addresses (~270 million addresses). This reduces the number of addresses that can potentially be allocated for routing on the public Internet. As addresses are being incrementally delegated to end users, an IPv4 address shortage has been developing, however network addressing architecture redesign via classful network design, Classless Inter-Domain Routing, and network address translation (NAT) has significantly delayed the inevitable exhaustion.

This limitation has stimulated the development of IPv6, which is currently in the early stages of deployment, and is the only long-term solution.

.
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#4
eradic8

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the IPs you're used to seeing are IPv4 addresses. the address you have is still an IPv4 address it's just not in the normal 192.168 range that people expect most frequently...the 192.168 block is reserved for private networking, and will never be seen on the public network (internet). most people are familiar with this block because it's what home routers and most home modems give out to the internal networks (LANs), it seems as though you are directly connected to your internet connection device (modem or what not) and not connected to a router. it's a bit odd that your computer itself would have this address though. even DSL/Cable modems tend to give out a private IP on the INSIDE. when you say you've got this address, how are you finding that out? ipconfig or whatsmyip.com (or similar)?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4
the important bit for what you're talking about:

IPv4 uses 32-bit (four-byte) addresses, which limits the address space to 4,294,967,296 (232) possible unique addresses. However, some are reserved for special purposes such as private networks (~18 million addresses) or multicast addresses (~270 million addresses). This reduces the number of addresses that can potentially be allocated for routing on the public Internet. As addresses are being incrementally delegated to end users, an IPv4 address shortage has been developing, however network addressing architecture redesign via classful network design, Classless Inter-Domain Routing, and network address translation (NAT) has significantly delayed the inevitable exhaustion.

This limitation has stimulated the development of IPv6, which is currently in the early stages of deployment, and is the only long-term solution.

.

I used a couple of online websites like you mentioned such as whatsmyip.com, but strangely file servers like rapidshare and megaupload show my IP as beginning with the number 64 so I dont know.
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