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Computer keeps freezing and being unable to boot


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#1
QuerlDox

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This is really getting me down now.

I honestly can't remember when it all started, but my computer has been refusing to work properly for months now. It keeps freezing, either while I'm doing something on the computer or right after the Windows XP logo.

I can't boot into Safe Mode at all, because it freezes then too, and I've performed at least 5 repair installs this year and none of them have helped.

It used to be BSODs over and over again (Driver IRQL not less or equal; page fault in nonpaged area; bad pool caller) and now, it doesn't even show them anymore. The computer just stops. The mouse won't move, the keyboard won't respond, everything on the screen freezes.

I've read on other websites that this might lead to faulty RAM, but I recently upgraded my RAM, so it can't be that. I really cannot afford to spend anymore money on this computer. They also say it might be a hardware problem, but I hadn't installed any new hardware before the problems started happening.

I can't even back up the main hard drive, because every time I try, it gets 80% of the way done and then freezes once again.

I'm really hoping that there's some way to fix this, because I need this computer and as I said, can't afford to buy a new one or any new hardware. I also can't afford to have it repaired by a professional, so that's out of the question.

I'd really appreciate any help on this. I'm at my wit's end.

EDIT: Forgot to mention that I'd also formatted it about 2 months ago, and that didn't solve the problem either.

Edited by QuerlDox, 21 May 2010 - 06:27 AM.

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#2
Alzeimer

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Probable causes:

Faulty ram, either ram not good or ram not recommended (brand and model) for your motherbaord check the ram QVL for your mobo.

Faulty video card or driver.

CPU overheating.

Bad drivers.

Resetting you BIOS setting can sometimes do wonders, so reset your CMOS settings to see if any improvement.

Never assume anything, test everything to be sure, it's not because it's new that it's perfect.
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#3
QuerlDox

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Faulty ram, either ram not good or ram not recommended (brand and model) for your motherbaord check the ram QVL for your mobo.

Don't think it's this. The RAM had been working before this started happening.

Faulty video card or driver.

Same as above. Have uninstalled and reinstalled the newest drivers multiple times.

Bad drivers.

Updated all of the drivers on here.

Resetting you BIOS setting can sometimes do wonders, so reset your CMOS settings to see if any improvement.

This didn't work either.

CPU overheating.

It could be this, though. Are there any other symptoms I'd be aware of if this were the case? I really hope this is why, because it'd be easy and cheap to resolve.
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#4
rshaffer61

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To add my opinion here. I would say you are looking at a overheating issue or a hd issue.
Since it happens when windows has not even started then the generic video driver is being used. Highly doubtful as that being the cause.
My suggestion is to try the heat issue by entering the bios and checking what the temps are in there.
I suggest doing the following steps in order to test the hardware.

Run hard drive diagnostics: http://www.tacktech....ay.cfm?ttid=287
Make sure, you select tool, which is appropriate for the brand of your hard drive.
Depending on the program, it'll create bootable floppy, or bootable CD.
If downloaded file is of .iso type, use ImgBurn: http://www.imgburn.com/ to burn .iso file to a CD (select "Write image file to disc" option), and make the CD bootable.

NOTE. If your hard drive is made by Toshiba, unfortunately, you're out of luck, because Toshiba doesn't provide any diagnostic tool.

Thanks to Broni for the instructions


If you have more than one RAM module installed, try starting computer with one RAM stick at a time.

NOTE Keep in mind, the manual check listed above is always superior to the software check, listed below. DO NOT proceed with memtest, if you can go with option A

B. If you have only one RAM stick installed...
...run memtest...

1. Download - Pre-Compiled Bootable ISO (.zip)
2. Unzip downloaded memtest86+-2.11.iso.zip file.
3. Inside, you'll find memtest86+-2.11.iso file.
4. Download, and install ImgBurn: http://www.imgburn.com/
5. Insert blank CD into your CD drive.
6. Open ImgBurn, and click on Write image file to disc
7. Click on Browse for a file... icon:

Posted Image

8. Locate memtest86+-2.11.iso file, and click Open button.
9. Click on ImgBurn green arrow to start burning bootable memtest86 CD:

Posted Image

10. Once the CD is created, boot from it, and memtest will automatically start to run. You may have to change the boot sequence in your BIOS to make it work right.

To change Boot Sequence in your BIOS
Reboot the system and at the first post screen (where it is counting up memory) start tapping the DEL button
This will enter you into the Bios\Cmos area.
Find the Advanced area and click Enter
Look for Boot Sequence or Boot Options and highlight that click Enter
Now highlight the first drive and follow the directions on the bottom of the screen on how to modify it and change it to CDrom.
Change the second drive to the C or Main Drive
Once that is done then click F10 to Save and Exit
You will prompted to enter Y to verify Save and Exit. Click Y and the system will now reboot with the new settings.


The running program will look something like this depending on the size and number of ram modules installed:


Posted Image

It's recommended to run 5-6 passes. Each pass contains very same 8 tests.

This will show the progress of the test. It can take a while. Be patient, or leave it running overnight.

Posted Image

The following image is the test results area:

Posted Image

The most important item here is the “errors” line. If you see ANY errors, even one, most likely, you have bad RAM.
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#5
123Runner

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You could have multiple issues.

I can't even back up the main hard drive, because every time I try, it gets 80% of the way done and then freezes once again.

This means you are in windows (sometimes), so it could be a video card or driver issue.

Just because you updated all the drivers does not mean they are not at fault. Some drivers don't play nice.
Also, even though you upgraded ram, ram can go bad.

We need to start testing things, and that is what Rshaffer61 is starting with. I would also test the ram as instructed.

There could be a PSU problem or a bad main board.

123runner
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