Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

making a compilation dvd


  • Please log in to reply

#1
glug

glug

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
Let me explain.
I'd like to take a number of dvds I have bought for my son which each contain multiple episodes of a given cartoon and make some compilation dvds, each containing one episode from each of the different dvds. The idea is to be able to play them on our in-car dvd player which only reads normal dvd format. (He gets bored just watching episode after episode of hte same thing).

Now I'm not sure that this is even possible so any advice on whether or not it is possible and if so which software to use would be greatly appreciated. I've explored various bits of software but they seem aimed at converting dvds to other formats which isn't what I want.
Any ideas much appreciated.

Gaby

Edited by glug, 22 May 2010 - 03:23 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
phillipcorcoran

phillipcorcoran

    Member 1K

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,293 posts
Most commercial DVD discs have built-in copy-protection which prevents copying for obvious reasons. The fact that you only want to copy from them for your own use makes no difference to the copyright holders. Long gone are the days when they turned a blind eye to copying for personal backup reasons. It's not legal any more, and just to make sure you comply they use copy-protection.

Some less popular titles might have no copy-protection but it's still illegal to copy them.
  • 0

#3
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts

Most commercial DVD discs have built-in copy-protection which prevents copying for obvious reasons. The fact that you only want to copy from them for your own use makes no difference to the copyright holders. Long gone are the days when they turned a blind eye to copying for personal backup reasons. It's not legal any more, and just to make sure you comply they use copy-protection.


Since when?
Under UK law there has never been any provision to make copies of copyrighted stuff for your own personal use (aka "fair use" in other countries). You cannot convert a CD to a tape or MP3 legally and play it in the car and claim it as fair use, for example. Likewise it is illegal to rip music to the computer without consent of the copyright holder. Under the same principle (but clarified in a court of law) it is only legal to record TV programmes providing you only record for you and you destroy the recording after 7 days. In reality it's completely unenforceable and mix-tapes (as they used to be called) were going on long before the ability to share them across the world was even thought of.

The situation is more clear-cut in other territories, namely America, for example, where it is permissible to rip and copy things under fair use(and has been enshrined in court cases over there).

The copy protection has been there since the concept of licensing (key word) copies of commercial to people at home. You'll find it on commercial videos, DVDs and the odd music CD, considering Sony managed to completely screw it up in 2005: http://en.wikipedia....tection_scandal

That being said, whether what the original poster wants to do would class as fair use depending on which part of the world they're from.
  • 0

#4
Artellos

Artellos

    Tech Secretary

  • Global Moderator
  • 3,888 posts
Hello Everyone,

@Glug,
As far as I know, it's perfectly fine to make a full copy for your own use, as this would fall under the 'fair use' that Neil Jones pointed out. I doubt that making a mix tape would apply under these same rules, though.

Because Laws are so different in each country it's hard to really give a good answer on these requests unless we know where you live. And even then, copyrights aren't the simplest thing in the world. :)

Regards,
Olrik
  • 0

#5
glug

glug

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
Thanks everyone for the info.
I'm in the UK so I'm assuming what I want to do isn't legal.
As to how I'd go about breaking the law if I chose to..... I'll have a think about whether or not to do that!

Gaby
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP