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Cooling Fans


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#1
MyQuestion

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I have a Toshiba Satellite A-75 that has an over-heating problem. We've noticed that one fan blows into the computer, the other fan draws air out (like an exhaust fan) Is this right or should both be blowing in? If this is wrong, is it a major repair or an easy fix that I could do myself.
Also any suggestions/warnings for cleaning dust/debri from fans and heatsink. Would it be better to try and vacuum the dust out or to try and blow it out?
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#2
dsenette

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We've noticed that one fan blows into the computer, the other fan draws air out (like an exhaust fan) Is this right or should both be blowing in? If this is wrong, is it a major repair or an easy fix that I could do myself.

this is how it's supposed to be, if they both blow in, then theres no way for the hot air to get out, if they blow out theres no way for fresh air to get back in.

Also any suggestions/warnings for cleaning dust/debri from fans and heatsink. Would it be better to try and vacuum the dust out or to try and blow it out?

i don't suggest using a vacuum unless it's a vacuum that's designed for computer work (there are some that have static prevention etc..). just use a can of compressed air to blow the funk out of everywhere. make sure that you hold all the fans still when you're using the air near them, if you don't you could spin them too fast and burn out the bearings
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#3
Neil Jones

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Vacuum cleaners generate static electricity.
Static electricity + Computer = Not Good.

If you're really brave, you may be able to take the bottom panels off to get access to the cooling fans, you can do it on some laptops. For everything else, a good old can of compressed air or if you have access to one, an air compressor, which is much more noisy and therefore much more fun. :)
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#4
iammykyl

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I would not recommend using a compressor, Air delivered at 80 PSI, usual output, through a small nozzle can do a lot of damage inside a computer case. Stick to the can.
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#5
Digerati

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I would not recommend using a compressor, Air delivered at 80 PSI, usual output, through a small nozzle can do a lot of damage inside a computer case. Stick to the can.


Air compressors are perfectly fine. I've been using them to clean electronics for nearly 40 years. Dentist use them in your mouth. Cake decorators use them to decorate cakes. The most critical thing to remember is that air compressors, if not properly maintained and equipped can spew out rusty, oily water and that would certainly be bad for electronics. Therefore you MUST ensure the compressor is regularly drained of condensation and it must be properly equipped with an moisture and particulate filter, such as one of these.

Always do this outdoors so the case fans don't suck it back in. When raining, you can use a vacuum, but as noted, the air and dust particles banging into the nozzle as they rush by have the potential to create extreme levels of static electricity, way more than enough to destroy sensitive devices such as memory modules, processors, and other semi-conductor devices. So the way to use a vacuum is simple. You wrap your hand around the nozzle leaving one finger sticking out which you plant on bare metal of the case when sticking nozzle and hand inside. Then you carefully move in closer to remove the dust, keeping that finger planted at all times.

That said, for the user with just 1 or 2 machines to keep clean, cans of compressed dusting gas work fine, if kept level when spraying to avoid excessively cold liquid from spewing out.

WARNING: These cans do NOT contain breathable air and so there is a push to stop calling it "canned air". The stuff is toxic, and sadly, is now being abused by those unable to "huff" spray paint.
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#6
phillpower2

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Has anyone tried one of these or are they a gimmick!
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...479713808762177
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#7
Digerati

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I suspect they will be good for picking up one stray eyelash at a time.
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#8
phillpower2

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Gimmick then :)
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