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Extra case fan.


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#1
iammykyl

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Hi.

I have an Antec 6-- case which has, 120mm rear fan and a 200mm top fan. The side panel has a place for a 120mm fan, opposite the video card.
What would be the most effective cooling option, fan installed as an extractor, or as an intake?

Thanks.
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#2
rshaffer61

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The more cool air you get into the case the more effective the system runs. The spot you mention for the video card is just that. You put a fan there to bring in cool air over the video card thus cooling the card down even more and the case benefits even more.
I have two fans on top, side fan over video, one fan in the front and two in the back. I have spots to put two more fans at the bottom of the case if I want.
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#3
Digerati

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Agreed. Front and sides draw cool air in, back and top exhaust hot air out. Generally you want front to back flow. If you have "blow hole" fans, and since heat rises naturally, top fans help with that. I have not seen a case with bottom fans, but to help the natural flow of heat, they would draw cool air in too.

That said, you generally want "flow" through the case where, normally, the only turbulence desired is directly on top of the CPU. I have seen "system" (motherboard/chipset) temperatures rise with the use of a side panel fan because it either disrupted that "flow" through the case, or disrupted the cooling effect across the chipset from the CPU's HSF. Some cases use a tube to direct side panel air to the CPU so it does not disrupt case cooling.

My point is, monitor all your temps carefully before and after and if the side fan does not help, don't use it as it will be a waste of energy, it will suck in more heat trapping dust, and it increases noise levels.

Finally, you can have too much air being drawn in causing an over-pressure effect. If you don't have enough vents or exhaust fans, this pressure actually causes the air to stagnate - or not move. And that means not enough "flow" to move the hot air out.
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#4
iammykyl

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Thanks guys for the info.

I will take some readings before and after modifications and post the results.
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#5
rshaffer61

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Thanks we always like to know if everything works out good or bad.
It may also help someone in the future with the same question. We look forward to your results.
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#6
iammykyl

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Hi everybody.
Long time coming but the results of testing are here > http://www.geekstogo...ts-cpu-cooling/

Thank you for your help.

Edited by iammykyl, 24 August 2010 - 08:32 PM.

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#7
iammykyl

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Hi everyone.

Taken some time to do the testing, results can be found here > http://www.geekstogo...ts-cpu-cooling/

Thank you for your help.
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#8
rshaffer61

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Something very strange about those readings. You have no +12 readings. That indicates a failing PSU.
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#9
iammykyl

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Hi rshaffer61 .

Thanks well spotted, I missed that but did notice that the Vcore2 was showing over volts in Speedfan and a warning in Sandrs. I was going to start a new post?

What information do you want?-
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#10
rshaffer61

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Download and install Free Everest Home Edition
Open it.
1: In left pane expand Computer folder.
2: Click once on Summary
3: In upper menu, go Report
4: And then to Quick Report-Summary
5: Save it in text file, and paste it in your next post.
Click the + by computer, click on Sensor. Get a screenshot and post it so I can check your temps and voltages...


DO NOT INCLUDE ANYTHING UNDER THE LINE THAT SAYS "DEBUG- PCI"
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#11
iammykyl

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[attachment=44342:Report.txt][attachment=44343:Sensor readings.jpg][attachment=44343:Sensor readings.jpg]
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#12
rshaffer61

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Yep +12 volt is not showing at all.
Everest report looks good.
Temps look good from what I'm seeing.
Sorry to do this but lets try one program to see if we can get a reading.
Please download and run Hardware Monitor
Installation (setup version only)

Run the setup executable file, and let it guide you for the installation process. The setup installs a service, that is started the first time that you run HWMonitor.
Make sure you get the Sensors showing and get us a screenshot of that.
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#13
iammykyl

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[attachment=44346:CPUID readings.jpg]
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#14
rshaffer61

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Everything points at the temps looking just about perfect in your system.
The problem really seems to be the PSU is not powering correctly. Do you have access to another PSU that you can try with your system?
I am going to ask Digerati to take a look at all these readings and see what he says. He is our resident PSU expert and can tell you for sure if my diagnosis is correct.
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#15
Digerati

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That is odd. Your HDs, fan, or the computer itself would not be running if you had no +12V so it must be the sensor. And I agree your temps look great. And +3.3 and +5V are well within tolerances too.

Just for verification, look on your Gigabyte utilities disk for a program called EasyTune - it might be ET6 (or you can get the latest version from the Gigabyte website). This has a HW monitor feature. What does it say for your +12V?
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