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Major Overheating (Acer Aspire 5536)


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#16
Loren Wyght

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Thank you for your reply and welcoming me, phillpower2!

Arctic MX-2 is the thermal compound that I have used. I thought that there is no big issue with using "a bit" more paste as it is non-metallic and any spillage shouldn't cause a problem but I will try to apply less next time. What is the downside of having too much thermal interface material? Is it not good for the heat transmission?

I have used lots on the IGP on the right as it had a relatively thick thermal pad on it beforehand and I wanted to make sure that any gap is filled. I'm not sure how successful I have been though as I cannot improved temperature readings. :-/

I tend to post in older threads to keep a sense of coherence of the topic so that if someone - like me - is searching for it, he/she finds it in one spot.
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#17
phillpower2

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Arctic MX-2 is the thermal compound that I have used. I thought that there is no big issue with using "a bit" more paste as it is non-metallic and any spillage shouldn't cause a problem but I will try to apply less next time. What is the downside of having too much thermal interface material? Is it not good for the heat transmission?

I have used lots on the IGP on the right as it had a relatively thick thermal pad on it beforehand and I wanted to make sure that any gap is filled. I'm not sure how successful I have been though as I cannot improved temperature readings. :-/

Did you take the time to read the tutorial of Digerati? All is revealed there.

I tend to post in older threads to keep a sense of coherence of the topic so that if someone - like me - is searching for it, he/she finds it in one spot.

The trouble with this is the issues may appear the same but are not and so the solutions will differ and others will see that the topic has received replies and think you are contributing to the topic and so overlook it and your request for help will be missed.
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#18
doppelsonnenuhr

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Typically the laptop cases are designed to operate within a certain temperature range, and if yours is over heating, it could be that the heatsink or fan on the CPU is not working properly; so cutting holes or extra vent slots won't necessarily solve the problem.


I have one of these - the cooling system is a large heatsink/fan assembly cooling the cpu and what appears to be a chipset chip. The fan is a centrifugal type, positioned over an access hole in the motherboard which in turn is situated over an area of the case that seems to have an unrealised vent through the underside case plastic. Given the position and design of the fan, it seems to have been intended to draw air up through the bottom of the case to be vented through a vent on the back. The back vent is open, the bottom vent is present in outline, but not open. This appears to be a design flaw, a thought which is borne out by my own experiences with this laptop.

I have a couple of brothers who helped me with my own (severe) overheating issue. I dismantled the laptop, replaced the heatsink compound where it was needed. They drilled the bottom vent such that it now forms a grille according to the original factory impression. My laptop was running at 75C and 550MHz for both cores prior to the modification. Now, it runs at 2200MHz and 56C, both cores, under heavy video processing load. The newly opened vent pulls cool air from the underside of the case - hot air is vented through the back vent. This appears, as stated, to have been the original design intention.

Prior to the mod, the fan was essentially just recirculating the warm air already present in the case, an observation backed up by the absence of large amounts of dust.

My brothers opened up the existing vent slats, but an easier modification for someone who *isn't* a wizard at dremel use, would be to cut the square grille area open on the underside of the case, and using a good quality glue like slow-curing epoxy, glue a fine plastic mesh in over the square (on the inside of the case botton) to cover the grille.

Do this only if you have bad heat problems, and only if you're confident of completing the modification without ruining the case.
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#19
doppelsonnenuhr

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Postscript:

I'd been running my 5536 under Linux prior to modding it, as the overheat problem had gotten bad enough that Windows 7 was causing a shutdown under anything more than minimal load. Subsequent to the mod, I found that the games I'd previously played under Windows 7 and very minimal graphics settings, could now be configured to use much more challenging settings. Additionally, the Windows Experience test, previously giving a score of 3.2, now gives 3.8 - most of the improvement presumably in the CPU and some thereof down to the graphics chipset (I'm too lazy to do an in-depth, and as I didn't preserve the 'before' scores, I have nothing to compare against barring the bare overall score.

In short, it's a lot faster, suggesting that it never ran at its true potential. I'm a bit annoyed about that, especially as the laptop's build quality and true performance, overall, is very very good for a budget model. While I'm impressed that Acer produced such a fine device, I'm less impressed that they didn't deal with the vent problem - they can hardly be unaware of it.
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#20
dafixitman

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Hi acer5536 over heating problem due to design fault, vent on the bottom is closed of why this is i dont no,any way i used a Stanly knife to cut open each slot without damaging the case,its time consuming but since i opened the vent i have had no heat problems, the highest is goes now is 70c playing games!,before it was reaching 98c to 100c,. so i recommend that u open it, be careful not to damage the case. :thumbsup:
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