Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

I think I accidently installed XP 64bit audio driver and now computer


  • Please log in to reply

#1
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts
Hi. Currently writing this from my laptop, cuz my desktop won't boot up... I have a feeling I accidentally installed a Windows XP 64bit driver for my onboard audio card, while I'm running a Windows XP 32bit system :)


This is what happened:

I have two sound cards in my desktop computer - one is the on-board Realtek audio on my Asus P5Q Pro motherboard, the other is an M-Audio Delta 2496 Audiophile PCI card. Till now I have had the on-board Realtek disabled and have exclusively used my M-Audio PCI sound card. But now I have decided to have both cards enabled since the M-audio card has only RCA outputs and I would like to use the onboard Realtek card for using Skype, GoogleTalk, etc.

Here are the steps I took:

In Device Manager I selected the Realtek Audio Device and selected: Enable. Although status changed to ENABLED there was a yellow explanation point. So I figured I had to reinstall the driver.

I went to the ASUS download page for the P5Q PRO Motherboard (Windows XP). This is the page: http://support.asus....SLanguage=en-us

And I downloaded the first in the list: Version 5.10.0.5859/6.0.1.58

I unpacked the .zip file and ran the exe file. Then I restarted... but now my computer won't boot. It says it can't recognize my hard drive.

Checking now on my laptop I noticed that the driver I had downloaded is for 64bit (i think). It seems I should have downloaded and installed the next on the list: 5.10.0.5657/6.0.1.56

One other thing I did - When my computer wouldn't boot up it brought me to a kind of set up page. it gave me some options: A) set up bios B) go to boot configuration C) set bios to default.

I selected C.

I thought this might restore things to how they were, but it didn't help.

The current situation is that when I restart my computer this is what happens:

1. I get some text saying: EXPRESS GATE
2. Then is says Error 8C000002. Express Gate is not installed on your system or installation is not complete.... (didn't have time to copy the rest, it flashes for just two seconds).
3. Then the ASUS P5Q PRO Motherboard splash screen comes up with some options at the bottom of the screen for going to Bios setup and so on
4. Then a message in system text comes up that says: Marvel 88SE61xx Adapter. Bios version 1.1.0.L7od Initializing...
5. The this message comes up: Reboot and Select proper Boot device or Insert Boot Media in selected Boot device and press a key.

Of all these messages and screens only the ASUS P5Q PRO Motherboard splash screen is normal when booting up my computer. All other messages are new due to the current situation.


Please help.......


I'm running Windows XP Pro 32bit

THANKS!

Edited by adifrank, 31 July 2010 - 05:04 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
DonnaB

DonnaB

    Miss Congeniality

  • GeekU Moderator
  • 5,962 posts
Hi adifrank,

Can you boot your computer into safe mode?

To enter safe mode: Restart the computer, and as soon as the computer starts, begin to tap the F8 key until the Windows Advanced Options menu appears. Use the arrow keys on the keyboard to select Safe mode, and then press Enter. In the menu choose Last known good configuration.

If this doesn't help, repeat the above to re-enter safe mode and choose System Restore.

Keep us informed to your progress.

Donna :)

Edited by DonnaB, 01 August 2010 - 12:09 AM.

  • 0

#3
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
If there is any problem that you suspect with the BIOS resetting the program should be your first step. This is done by disconnecting the power cord and taking the CMOS battery out for 10 minutes. Reinstall, reboot and when you get a BIOS error message set time and date. If you need more instructions please ask.
  • 0

#4
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts

Can you boot your computer into safe mode?


Hi. Thanks for your reply. First of all, I'd like to point out that with some help I seem to have overcome the Express Gate error by disabling Express Gate in the ASUS BIOS setup.

Now about trying to boot in safe mode - Tapped F8. Got to a page where it asks me which drive I want to boot from. Selected my system drive, pressed ENTER and then got the same two messages as before:

Marvel 88SE61xx Adapter. Bios version 1.1.0.L7od Initializing...
(underneath this some message about not finding a boot drive)

then...

Reboot and Select proper Boot device or Insert Boot Media in selected Boot device and press a key.
  • 0

#5
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts

If there is any problem that you suspect with the BIOS resetting the program should be your first step. This is done by disconnecting the power cord and taking the CMOS battery out for 10 minutes. Reinstall, reboot and when you get a BIOS error message set time and date. If you need more instructions please ask.


CMOS battery? Where can I find this battery?
  • 0

#6
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
The battery looks like a wrist watch battery, but larger. It is located on the motherboard. Take it out carefully.
  • 0

#7
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts

If there is any problem that you suspect with the BIOS resetting the program should be your first step. This is done by disconnecting the power cord and taking the CMOS battery out for 10 minutes. Reinstall, reboot and when you get a BIOS error message set time and date. If you need more instructions please ask.


Hi Skeptic. It has been suggested by someone that I make a repair installation of Windows XP using the XP CD.
When booting with the Windows XP CD - I get to Windows XP setup page - and there is no option to do a repair of Windows. Only option is to do a fresh install.

So I'm thinking now of just doing a fresh installation of Windows and re-installing all my software.

My questions are:

1. Do you think this is the right step to take? (my system - windows and programs - is all on a separate drive, so no personal data will be lost)

2. If so, is it still necessary in your opinion to go ahead with the resetting of the BIOS (removing battery)?

3. Regarding the resetting of the BIOS program - please take into account that I have very limited knowledge in all of this stuff, so if you can be very specific and give me a step-by-step instructions, it would be most helpful and re-assuring. For example, when you say re-install after removing the battery for 10 minutes - do you mean re-install the battery? or is it something relating to the BIOS program that i am supposed to re-install?

Thank you!
  • 0

#8
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
If you are not worried about reformatting your system drive and reinstalling Windows - go for it. At the end of the day this is the best, often the fastest, most thorough computer repair. It's quite a drastic measure in your case but, as I said, if you feel comfortable it will surely do the job and leave you with a clean, fast and stable system. Be cautious and disconnect, for the duration of the reinstallation, the data cable of the hard disk which you want to keep intact. This will make sure that no data is accidentally damaged.

Regarding resetting the BIOS: It's a simple procedure but leave it for the time being.
  • 0

#9
DonnaB

DonnaB

    Miss Congeniality

  • GeekU Moderator
  • 5,962 posts
Hi adifrank,

I agree with Skeptic, if the other suggestions did not help solve your issue, a repair install is your best option, and would have been my final suggestion as well. You should not lose any personal data with the repair install, though you may need your OS disk. In any case, please back up you data.

Excellent guide by admin to read thoroughly before beginning this process.

I see that you have also posted here as well concerning this issue. Posting in more than one forum can cause confusion and takes time away from others who need help.

Please keep us informed. We're always here if you need us.

Donna :)
  • 0

#10
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts

Be cautious and disconnect, for the duration of the reinstallation, the data cable of the hard disk which you want to keep intact. This will make sure that no data is accidentally damaged.


I feel like jumping out the window... I went to the trouble of having my system installed on a dedicated drive exactly for this type of situation. I have a total of 3 drives in my computer. I opened up my computer to disconnect the SATA cables of the two non-system drives and.... I can't freaking remember which drive is the "system drive" and which are for storing data :)

I am pretty confident about one drive NOT being the system drive because it is 750 GB.

Then there are two smaller drives - one is 500GB and one 320GB. Logic tells me that the system drive is the smallest of them - the 320GB drive. But I'm not 100% sure. Is there any way I can possibly check which drive has Windows installed on it (in the situation I'm in... meaning I can't boot up my computer and it looks as though the computer does not recognize my boot drive?

I agree with Skeptic, if the other suggestions did not help solve your issue, a repair install is your best option, and would have been my final suggestion as well. You should not lose any personal data with the repair install, though you may need your OS disk. In any case, please back up you data.

Thanks DonnaB for your reply. Unfortunately, I tried it and my computer won't give me that option. No option to repair, only to make a clean install of Windows. From the instructions in the link - it says something about this and that it means that the boot disk is corrupted or something and that it is beyond repair. Therefore only clean install is available.

I see that you have also posted here as well concerning this issue. Posting in more than one forum can cause confusion and takes time away from others who need help.

Being without a computer caused my anxiety level to rise so I posted in two forums hoping that I'll be able to resolve this problem as fast as possible. Also, like in medicine, a 2nd opinion is always a good idea. But you're right about it being a bit unfair to others... so I'll avoid doing that in the future if it is regarded as unethical in the forum.
  • 0

Advertisements


#11
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts
Ok. just a short update. I eventually decided to remove each hard drive, one-by-one, and put them in an external HDD enclosure I have. Then I checked each one with my laptop and finally found which of the drives is the one that is my designated System Drive.

So that part is solved.

Now I'll go ahead and re-install Windows.

But first... I just want to make sure if I should / or should not set the BIOS program to the default settings. And if yes - should this be done before the install of Windows XP, or after? Or does it not matter?

Thanks!
  • 0

#12
DonnaB

DonnaB

    Miss Congeniality

  • GeekU Moderator
  • 5,962 posts

Being without a computer caused my anxiety level to rise so I posted in two forums hoping that I'll be able to resolve this problem as fast as possible.


I know what you mean. Been there myself.

If the BIOS is configured to boot from CD, you shouldn't have to reset default settings. If you want to test whether your system can boot with the CD, just insert a bootable CD (like your Windows XP CD-ROM) and reboot. If Setup begins or you see a message about hitting any key to boot from the CD, you're all set.

To set up your system to boot from the CD, you'll need to enter the BIOS software and change the boot order.
  • 0

#13
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
I think that you did well by taking the long road to make sure which hard disk to format. There is nothing more frustrating then formatting the wrong drive.

Regarding windows repair: I intentionally use the term "format" which is entirely different from "windows repair". Windows repair is a process that often fail and sometimes leave you in a worse condition then before. I learned it the hard way and stopped using it altogether. What I recommend is clean format and installation of windows on your system drive (which should be marked as such to avoid future confusion).

Regarding the BIOS resetting. This is a very simple operation which I always do when having the slightest suspicion of hardware involved problems. Please follow these instructions:

Disconnect the power cable from the back of the computer. Open the side cover and carefully take out the cmos battery which is attached to the motherboard(looks like a silvery button. You can't confuse it with any other part). Keep it out for 10 minutes. Reinstall and reboot. You will certainly get a checksome error or some other message. Enter BIOS and set time and date. Also set your CD drive to be first priority boot device. Save the new values and let the computer boot.
  • 0

#14
adifrank

adifrank

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 202 posts
UPDATE:

I've finished making the clean install of Windows XP.

Computer boots up. :)

But a few things still trouble me - I'm getting that Express Gateway error again. And also I get that other strange message I normally would not get, but have been getting since running into problems:
Marvel 88SE61xx Adapter. Bios version 1.1.0.L70d Initializing...

Adapter 1
Disks Information:
No hard disk is detected!


Anybody know what these are about?
<<< EDIT: Doing a bit of Googling, I found out some things. ONE - that the Marvel 88SE61xx Adapter.... message is apparently because I have some disconnected hard drive connectors. From what I've read - possible to stop this message from appearing by turning off the onboard IDE adapter in the BIOS.
TWO - It seems that Express Gate is a feature that ASUS has added to some of its motherboards that enables quick internet access after boot. Not an essential feature and one that can be switched disabled. The error is coming up apparently because for my particular motherboard - this feature is not installed on a MB chip, but rather has to be installed with the MB CD-ROM.

So I'll try going with this new information and see if I can remove these messages that I'm getting. So only one question remains.... (below)
(end of edit)>>>


Also I'd like to ask if in your opinions - should I download/run any BIOS updates or things of that sort? Since I bought the computer over a year ago...

Looking forward to your replies.... THX

Edited by adifrank, 02 August 2010 - 07:40 AM.

  • 0

#15
diabillic

diabillic

    Member 1K

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,370 posts
Marvell is your network card, the machine is trying to boot to PXE which is usually last in the boot order by default.

Just turn off Express Gate, especially if youre not using it. Its a feature that is included in the BIOS.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP