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Using an IBM power adapter on my Toshiba laptop


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#1
linuxwannabee

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Hi folks - been a long time since my last visit/post.

My problem is with my toshiba power adaptor, which through movement of cable over time, caused the inner wires to become exposed outside of the moulded plastic housing of the plug. Shouldn't really happen, and managed to survive a little while by playing with the cable (moving it around), but it's sparking (shorting) now, and it's getting harder to simple move the cable and get power into the laptop.

Obviously, I will buy a suitable replacement part asap, but in the meantime, here is the scenario:

My AC Adapter (19V, 3.95A, 75W, 3-pin) Part No. PA3468E-1AC3 for Toshiba Laptop L40 18Z is now useless. I am currently risking using an IBM Thinkpad adaptor (my old laptop) after checking the spec. The centre pin polarity is the same, I cannot currently find any references to Wattage output for the IBM adaptor - but the only difference I can very is in ampage and voltage.

The defunct toshiba adapter is rated 19v and 3.95 amps.

The IBM adapter is rated 16v and 4.5 amps.

So far, I've used the IBM for several hours with no ill effect - risky I know! The lower voltage means that the battery isn't charging - but my concern is the higher ampage - 0.55 more. Could this damage the sensitive internal electrics in the longer term - or is it unlikely to make a difference. If it works, which it does - could I confidently continue to use this until I've sourced a proper replacement.

I'm after opinion here - I know that ultimately the risk is mine - but thought I'd throw it in and see what the concensus is.

Thanks.

Dave B - Linuxwannabee
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#2
Neil Jones

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It should be fine. The figure would be rated for the original laptop but the laptop will only take what it needs ampage wise. All that figure means the PSU can supply 4.5amps, not that it will always deliver 4.5amps.
Voltage wise, yes it doesn't charge because it's too low, but if it was too high you'd blow the bejesus out of the entire unit and you'd have known about it the second you plugged it in.

You'll probably find that that power supply can charge the battery if the laptop is off. This usually means there isn't enough juice to do two jobs at once. It should be okay.
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#3
linuxwannabee

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Thanks for the reply Neil.

Yes, I too figured less voltage (but enough) was preferable to too much voltage!

Half an amp was a minor concern - didn't want to melt the power supply over time.

Sourcing a genuine toshiba part is proving difficult. In any case, according to Toshiba's web site, this would cost £55 approx. When I googled the part no. there are plenty on ebay and amazon. These are third party manufactured devices - I wondered if it was okay to use these - they are lots cheaper, typcially £10-£20. Big difference.

Good idea regarding the battery charging whilst the laptop isn't running. Alas, the battery is screwed now anyway - I only get approx. 10 mins out of it, so even if I managed to charged it, that annoying battery alarm would be heard soon. Is there any way of disabling this alarm - bios setting perhaps?

Thanks for any additional help.

linxwannabee
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#4
amw_drizz

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I had an old Dell Latitude laptop. The power adapter went on it, so I picked up a cheap $30 US one off of ebay. It ran fine but killed the battery in 6 months time. Even though the voltage and amps were the same, it couldn't handle running just one or the other. I ended up buying a replacement OEM from ebay that was Dell branded and it worked fine for a few more years until I retired the laptop.

For my past experience I wouldn't risk it. And get an OEM adapter.
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#5
phillpower2

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Either right click your battery icon in the bottom right
or go control panel, hardware and sound, power options
choose the plan you use most, or do it for all 3 if you
switch it up, and click the change plan settings link under
it click change advanced power settings after which you
will get the power options window, then its just battery -
low battery notification > turn it off.
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#6
linuxwannabee

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Thanks Phillipower2 - good tip on the battery options - didn't realise so many options were 'hidden' in their! Thanks also to amw_drizz - good advice on the OEM power supply front. Think I will save up my pennies and buy the geniune toshiba replacement, though thus far finding it hard to find supplier! Seems like most mainstream dealers are concerned with selling new kit only - not supporting older/existing kit.

Mods - please feel free to consider this thread closed.

Thanks again to all who offered advice.

Dave B - Linuxwannabee
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#7
phillpower2

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You are welcome & I am glad I was able to help you with at least part
of the issue :) best of luck with finding the correct battery.
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