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Pc stuck in reboot cycle


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#1
spacecat

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Hello everybody,
A few days ago I decided to clean my pc, as it was extremely dusty. (see pic of cpu, it was literally caked in the stuff...).
I also planned to rearrange my wires, and generally give the whole system a spring cleaning (it was a total mess before see pic 2)

I'm usually the kind of person to just jump in, so that's exactly what I did, i wore an esd band to make sure I didn't fry anything and just set to work spending a good few hours to clean an get my wire problem under control (pic 3 is what is what it looks like now, pic 4 is clean cpu)
Now in my work i may have not connected everything back up probably, I'm not the most experienced an that brings us to the problem, when i plugged it in, sounds like everything is good, but after 30 seconds or so, it makes the reboot noise and begins the startup cycle again!

i get no input on the monitor, that may be due to the fact that i recently brought a new one and actually installed the drivers to it instea of it being 'plug and play'(dell 2209wa if that matters), it only starts around the 'welcome to windows' screen (like the drivers have only just loaded)so i am unable to see if there is input initially, or enter the bios or anything like that.

I Hope that its my own stupidity and haven't connected the parts back up properly, instead of actually frying a part.
I doubt it would be the RAM, as that's relatively new, my hunch says its the cpu, but i have heard they are very difficult to fry my pc
tech specs are below,

Tech specs
Windows xp sp3 home edition
Motherboard.......Biostar gf7050v-m7
Cpu...............IntelŪpentiumŪdual CPU e2200 @ 2.2 GHz
Ram...............3.25 RAM (4gb)
Video.............Ati raedon hd 2400
Power supply...win power atx 450 (bad I know)
realtek hd audio manager
Avg internet security 3-pack (full edition)

Picture of Cpu before cleanup .....................http://tinypic.com/v...pic=30j5p2v&s=4
Picture of Cpu after cleaning ..................... http://tinypic.com/v...?pic=aloqhe&s=4
Picture of system before cleaning.............. http://tinypic.com/v...pic=2i1mcly&s=4
Picture of system after cleaning.................. http://tinypic.com/v...?pic=6i46l4&s=4

Thankyou for your time! please don't hesitate if I missed anything.
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#2
phillpower2

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I suggest a step by step approach to check that all connections are as they should be.
1: Is the CPU attached securely and the CPU fan plugged into the MB.
2: Remove and reseat the video card securely.
3: Same as the above for the Ram stick/s.
4: Check that the case connections to the MB header are securely in place (Power led, Reset Switch,HDD led etc)
5: Ensure that all power connectors are firmly in their sockets, 12v 4pin ATX, 20/24pin mainboard, HDD & optical drives, ensure that data ribbons/leads are also secure.)
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#3
spacecat

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I suggest a step by step approach to check that all connections are as they should be.
1: Is the CPU attached securely and the CPU fan plugged into the MB.
2: Remove and reseat the video card securely.
3: Same as the above for the Ram stick/s.
4: Check that the case connections to the MB header are securely in place (Power led, Reset Switch,HDD led etc)
5: Ensure that all power connectors are firmly in their sockets, 12v 4pin ATX, 20/24pin mainboard, HDD & optical drives, ensure that data ribbons/leads are also secure.)


Ok I Have tried the steps and I am somewhat confindent that all cables are secure (why I provided pictures). Bad news though, I turned on the front Led to check it was working, the light flashed and the whole system shut down, filling the room with the smell of burning(same smell i got when i fried some RAM sticks a while back- really not good with computers lol). so if i have not fried a part before this, I almost definately have now :)

Almost no idea what to do now, somethingg has probably fried,somethincant buy a new pc as im a skint student, and i love all the cool stuff my pc had on it :)

Thanks again for your time
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#4
phillpower2

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Can you remove your psu and get it tested correctly, I wouldn`t attempt any further
testing of the computer until you have done this or got a known working psu.
Remove the MB from the case and do a barebones set-up on a piece of cardboard, only
attach the MB, video, 1 stick of Ram and the keyboard, the idea is to try and get
at least the BIOS screen to start with.
Good luck and keep us posted.
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#5
spacecat

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Can you remove your psu and get it tested correctly, I wouldn`t attempt any further
testing of the computer until you have done this or got a known working psu.
Remove the MB from the case and do a barebones set-up on a piece of cardboard, only
attach the MB, video, 1 stick of Ram and the keyboard, the idea is to try and get
at least the BIOS screen to start with.
Good luck and keep us posted.



im trying this now, can you please tell me what you mean by 'get it tested correctly'
i will see if i get input from pc anyhow..
thanks for your time!

#i hit a snag, it seems that the cpu bracket is welded in place, it would take a lot of force to lift it. any ideas

Edited by spacecat, 16 August 2010 - 02:58 PM.

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#6
spacecat

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well it keeps on getting worse, turned on pc, no noise, RAM led's wont flash. video card isnt working, i will be on tomorrow i need a rest before i go crazy :'(
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#7
phillpower2

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I am not sure what you mean by

#i hit a snag, it seems that the cpu bracket is welded in place, it would take a lot of force to lift it. any ideas

Nothing should be welded in place or need any force to remove it, all components that require removal are secured by screws only and the CPU can stay in the MB socket for testing, the heatsink and fan should not be removed at this time.
Below is the canned text provided by Digerati, which explains psu testing procedures.

To properly and conclusively test a power supply unit (PSU), it must be tested under various realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive ripple and other anomalies. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronic repair facilities.

Fortunately, there are other options that are almost as good. I keep a FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester in my tool bag when I am "in the field" and don't have a good spare power supply to swap in. While not a certain test, they are better than nothing. The advantage of this model is that it has an LCD readout of the voltage. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within specified ATX Form Factor Standard tolerances. Lesser models use LEDs to indicate the voltage is just within some "range". These are less informative, considerably cheaper, but still useful for detecting PSUs that have already "failed". Newegg has several testers to choose from. All these testers contain a "dummy load" to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to a motherboard, and therefore allows the PSU to power on, if able, without being attached to a motherboard - great for testing fans, but again, it is not a true load or suitable for conclusive testing.

Swapping in a known good supply is a tried and trued method of troubleshooting, used for years even by pros. If you have access to a suitably sized, spare power supply, carefully remove the suspect supply and replace it with a known good one and see if the problem goes away.

I do not recommend using a multimeter to test power supplies. To do it properly, that is, under a realistic load, the voltages on all the pins must be measured while the PSU is attached to the motherboard and the computer powered on. This requires poking (with some considerable force) two hard and sharp, highly conductive meter probes into the main power connector, deep in the heart of the computer. One tiny slip can destroy the motherboard, and everything plugged into it. It is not worth the risk considering most multimeters, like plug-in testers, do not measure, or reveal any unwanted and potentially disruptive AC components to the DC voltages.

Note the required voltage tolerance ranges:

And remember, anything that plugs into the wall can kill. Do not open the power supply's case unless you are a qualified electronics technician. There are NO user serviceable parts inside a power supply.

Thank you to Digerati for the above.
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