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Friends motherboard burnt and smoked...


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#1
Battery55

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http://www.tigerdire...dy=#ReviewStart

I was putting this barebones together for him and when I powered it up I would get a little twitch from the CPU fan and that's it. I was thinking the PSU was bad. My other friend decided to turn the voltage from 115 to 230. When he powered it up, it fried a chip on the motherboard. I think the PSU was bad in the first place. My friend just got this from tiger so he's gonna RMA the mobo and the PSU. Another issue I had was that I couldn't get the board to mount to the case. I could get 3 screws in but that's it. I'm not sure if that had anything to do with it but I've heard if you don't mount it properly it can cause shorts. I've also heard that turning it up to 230 in the US won't actually cause any damage to the components. I think it was a faulty PSU. So my question is which of these things would cause that? Also, what can I do to prevent this from happening in the future when we get the new mobo and PSU? If a faulty PSU in the same package caused damage to the motherboard then will they replace damaged components due to the faulty product? And are we in any danger of causing damage to the RAM or CPU? The CPU is OEM so I was concerned about that.
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#2
Battery55

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I just realized that I didn't use the standoffs and that's likely what fried the motherboard. Will they RMA the motherboard or will they have some way of detecting that it was user error? And if I did that would it mess up the RAM and CPU?
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#3
SpywareDr

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If you had the bottom of the motherboard screwed directly down to the metal backplate in the case, there is no telling what all damage may have occurred. Anything on, or attached to the motherboard could have been ruined the instant you flipped the power switch on.
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#4
rshaffer61

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Please remove the motherboard from the computer along with the power supply

place the motherboard on a piece of card board larger than the motherboard,



Install the cpu with, 1 stick ram in dimm 1, power supply, case switch and case speaker
Connect ps2 mouse and keyboard along with the monitor
Start up PSU and see if you get post screen
If the computer now boots into bios you most likely had a case short so make sure when installing the motherboard in the case that you use standoffs,
and they line up with the mounting holes in the motherboard and none of the standoffs touch anything else on the underside of the board.
If still no joy then it would seem the motherboard is shot.
If no beep code is heard then the memory and cpu probably are not getting any power and until you replace motherboard there would be no way to know if they may have been affected.
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#5
Digerati

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I just realized that I didn't use the standoffs and that's likely what fried the motherboard. Will they RMA the motherboard or will they have some way of detecting that it was user error?

Well, hopefully, you would be honest and tell them how it happened. That said, if there was any arcing, which is quite possible, then yes, with careful examination, they would be able to tell exactly what happened.

And if I did that would it mess up the RAM and CPU?

Maybe, maybe not. It depends on what circuit actually shorted to ground. If it was a circuit that when through the CPU or RAM, then it may have fried them too. If the circuit did not, then it may have shorted any damaging voltage to the ground and actually isolated the CPU or RAM from any damage. With the 1000s of points under a motherboard, as SpywareDr said, anything is possible, including destroying the power supply too.

Sadly, this can be a costly mistake, that most of us have made, once. I agree with rshaffer, remove everything and try it on a hard, flat non-conductive surface. If using cardboard, make sure it is plain, with no stickers or printing as some ink has conductive properties. I use a wood cutting board from the kitchen.

It must be noted that cases are designed to support 1000s of motherboards so there is almost always more mounting holes in the case than there are in the motherboard. So what often happens is the opposite of your problem - users have too many stand-offs installed, which also shorts the motherboard. So make sure you only have a standoff in a case mounting hole that corresponds to a mounting hole in the motherboard.
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#6
rshaffer61

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Thanks for the confirmation Digerati as it is always best to have a second set of eyes look at the situation.
Sadly I fear the mobo is lost but this will verify it and start the resolution process.
Hopefully the cpu and memory didn't take a hit but we won't know till the new mobo is installed. Just as a added measure I would do the same bench test with the new motherboard before installing it in the system. This way if the cpu and or memory did take a hit then you can replace it before assembling the system again.
This is what i would do just to make sure i am not tearing everything apart again.
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#7
Battery55

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He's already spoken with them about replacing the motherboard and PSU, they're sending a new one now. So hopefully if I just put it together correctly this time all will be well. Thanks for the help guys. This is my second machine, I left out a minor detail that turned out to be a huge problem, lol. I was wondering why the board wouldnt fit.
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#8
123Runner

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My other friend decided to turn the voltage from 115 to 230. When he powered it up, it fried a chip on the motherboard

And changing the voltage from 115 to 230 is not a good idea either. Since the psu's generate DC voltage it probably did no harm.
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