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Netgear Wireless- N Dual Band Adapter


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#1
ggsnickets

ggsnickets

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Hi,

I bought a router from the store but the clerk told me that I should get a wireless adapter (I shouldn't even need the router) if my laptop already receives wireless signals and i just want to make them stronger (i want my red bars to be green :D ) However, when i bought the wireless adapter, my connection strength stayed the same (2 red bars on my toolbar) and i still can only access a connection from one room of my house. I have a Dell Inspiron 2200 laptop, with Windows XP and a built in wireless LAN card. My computer detects a Netgear connection from somewhere in the neighborhood already but I need it to be stronger. Do I have the right product, should I be using it with some other product? I am completely lost ;)
Thanks in advance for any help
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#2
SpywareDr

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Are you asking us to help you steal someone else's internet service?
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#3
ggsnickets

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No, not at all. My computer picks up two wireless signals. One says netgear, which is really now when it comes in and the other says Free Public Wifi. I bought the wireless adapter thinking that it would make the signal from Free Public Wifi come in stronger ( i live close to a mcDonalds so thats where i think its coming from) but the adapter does nothing for either of the signals that Im getting. So im coming to the conclusion that wireless adapters are pretty much pointless for laptops.
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#4
SpywareDr

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Increasing signal strength would need to be done at the source of the signal.

Wikipedia: Wi-Fi > Reach
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Wifi#Reach

Wi-Fi networks have limited range. A typical wireless router using 802.11b or 802.11g with a stock antenna might have a range of 32 m (120 ft) indoors and 95 m (300 ft) outdoors. The IEEE 802.11n however, can exceed that range by more than two times.[28] Range also varies with frequency band. Wi-Fi in the 2.4 GHz frequency block has slightly better range than Wi-Fi in the 5 GHz frequency block. Outdoor ranges - through use of directional antennas - can be improved with antennas located several kilometres or more from their base. In general, the maximum amount of power that a Wi-Fi device can transmit is limited by local regulations, such as FCC Part 15[29] in USA.


Wikipedia: Wi-Fi > Piggybacking
http://en.wikipedia....fi#Piggybacking

[Piggybacking] could possibly lead wireless users to send sensitive data to the wrong middle-man when seeking a destination (see Man-in-the-middle attack). For example, a user could inadvertently use an insecure network to log in to a website, thereby making the login credentials available to anyone listening, if the website uses an insecure protocol such as HTTP.


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