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Can I delete these files?


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#1
Wol

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There are several folders scattered over my HD with titles containing about 24 obviously random alphanumerics. Inside are two folders, amd64 and i386.

I would guess they are some sort of backup/restore folders. Can they be moved or deleted, please?

Edited by Wol, 23 September 2010 - 12:26 PM.

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#2
Jacee

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See this for amd64 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86-64
i386 has to do with your processor, as above.
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#3
Wol

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See this for amd64 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86-64
i386 has to do with your processor, as above.


So your answer would be...what?
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#4
zep516

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The i386 folder holds the files used to install, repair, modify, update and rebuild Windows. Though these files are also located on your Windows installation CD (if you have one), I recommend you not delete anything located here. Deleting these files won’t recover much room, and the convenience of having the files there save a lot of time for us techie-types. (The contents of the i386 folder can commonly be found in the folder at C:\Windows\Options\Cabs. This Windows "cabs" folder is essentially the same as the i386 folder.)


When in doubt don't delete anything!
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#5
Wol

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Thanks all.

(I tried to reply yesterday but the site was locked out.)
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#6
diabillic

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you dont absolutely NEED them, but it would be wise of you to keep them...especially if you do not have access to a windows cd.
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#7
devper94

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They look like extracted Windows updates. They are created when you install an update manually.
I deleted them without any ill effects, but I don't think you should. Better make a backup first.
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#8
Wol

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They look like extracted Windows updates. They are created when you install an update manually.
I deleted them without any ill effects, but I don't think you should. Better make a backup first.


I make backups every day so no worries there.

I hate the W7 way of presenting folders and can't get to grips with libraries, so I was thinking of making another partition on my C drive for all my data, formatting the bit that presently contains the OS and reinstalling seven from scratch. From the replies above those files wouldn't be of any use in this scenario anyway?

At a tangent, any ideas of a comfortable size to leave the partition that W7 will be installed to? It would have to be large enough to hold programs and swap files. I suppose the best idea would be to make it pretty big , install everything and reduce the partition when I see the amount used.
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