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New PC Build crashes


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#16
rhymin

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Ok PC PitStop looks good.
Got a couple of questions.
When you built the new system did you install XP fresh or did you use the hd out of the old system?
Do you have a XP installation disk?
You stated you did option A for the memory testing but I would like you to do the actual memory diagnostics.
Finally I would like you to do the following two sets of instructions.



I'm using Windows 7 64 bit. My old pc is in the other room and I got the same exact blue screen on it that I'm getting now. You think it could be my copy of Windows 7? Could it be my power surge by any chance? I am so stumped, I have no clue.

Sorry for the confusion, when I signed up for this site in 09 I was still using XP, I forgot to change my o/s description on here to windows 7 64 bit.
When I bought windows 7 I did so as a student and got it for $30, but I had to d/l the .iso file from a site and imgburn it, you think my copy of win7 could be causing these problems?

Edited by rhymin, 16 October 2010 - 02:01 PM.

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#17
rhymin

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Finally I would like you to do the following two sets of instructions.

Download TFC by OldTimer to your desktop

  • Please double-click TFC.exe to run it. (Note: If you are running on Vista, right-click on the file and choose Run As Administrator).
  • It will close all programs when run, so make sure you have saved all your work before you begin.
  • Click the Start button to begin the process. Depending on how often you clean temp files, execution time should be anywhere from a few seconds to a minute or two. Let it run uninterrupted to completion.
  • Once it's finished it should reboot your machine. If it does not, please manually reboot the machine yourself to ensure a complete clean.

Download Auslogics Defrag from the link in my signature below. Auslogics Defrag in my opinion is better because:

It does a more comprehensive job at Defragging
It will actually show you what it is doing
At the end of working it will show you how much speed you picked up
You can view a online log of the files that Auslogics defragged


I have finished these steps and the programs ran smoothly as my HDD is new and it didn't take long to defrag and delete temp files. I am just so stumped.... I am using the 2 24 inch monitors that my old PC was using...that, and my power surge, are the only hardware my new PC is using from my old one...
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#18
rshaffer61

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You think it could be my copy of Windows 7?

Please explain.. are you saying your Win 7 is not a Genuine Microsoft win 7?
If not is it a downloaded or burned copy?
Have you run the memtest86 program as I suggested? understand you did option A but I would like to see a more in depth test run on the memory.
Other then the HD diagnostics I am not seeing anything. The one thing i may ask is have you tried to use only one video card instead of being in SLI mode?

also what is the make and model of your PSU?
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#19
rhymin

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The copy of windows 7 is genuine (as i have a valid product key), I just got it off some site that was offering a huge discount to college students and d/led the .iso file from the site and put it on a dvd. I was just wondering if it could be windows 7, my 2 monitors, or my surge protector causing the problems b/c those are the only hardware devices that my old pc used too. I just think it's weird I get the exact same error on this pc that I did with my old one. I will run the memtest86 program next. I did try one video card for a brief time and it too crashed.

My PSU is:

AZZA Dynamo 850 850W ATX & EPS 12V 2.91 SLI Ready Crossfire Ready Power Supply (I bought it cheap with a case combo on a newegg deal)
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#20
rshaffer61

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I would like to see the voltages somehow
Can you try this:
Download Speedfan (The download link is to the right), and install it. Once it's installed, run the program and post here the information it shows.
The information I want you to post is the stuff that is circled in the example picture I have attached.
To make sure we are getting all the correct information it would help us if you were to attach a screenshot like the one below of your Speedfan results.

To do a screenshot please have click on your Print Screen on your keyboard.
  • It is normally the key above your number pad between the F12 key and the Scroll Lock key
  • Now go to Start and then to All Programs
  • Scroll to Accessories and then click on Paint
  • In the Empty White Area click and hold the CTRL key and then click the V
  • Go to the File option at the top and click on Save as
  • Save as file type JPEG and save it to your Desktop
  • Attach it to your next reply

Posted Image
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#21
rhymin

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Here is the screenshot of SpeedFan...

Attached Thumbnails

  • SpeedFan.jpg

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#22
rshaffer61

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AHAAAAAAAAAA... I think we have found it Watson :D
Look at your +3 and +12 voltages.
Those readings indicate a serious problem with the PSU. In order to verify it please do the following.

Download SIW from HERE and get the Standalone English version
It will install itself and when finished
Then Click on SIW Icon to run program
On the left side click on one at a time of the following and then on the right, copy and paste the information in your next reply



Motherboard Info:

Download SIW from HERE and get the Standalone English version
It will install itself and when finished

Then Click on SIW Icon to run program
On the left side click on the Sensor directory and then on the right, copy and paste the information in your next reply


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#23
rshaffer61

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I am borrowing the below from a fellow Tech Staff member named Digerati who I trust on PSU issues.

Here is my canned text on testing PSUs:

To properly and conclusively test a power supply unit (PSU), it must be tested under various realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive ripple and other anomalies. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronic repair facilities.

Fortunately, there are other options that are almost as good. I keep a FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester in my tool bag when I am "in the field" and don't have a good spare power supply to swap in. While not a certain test, they are better than nothing. The advantage of this model is that it has an LCD readout of the voltage. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within specified ATX Form Factor Standard tolerances. Lesser models use LEDs to indicate the voltage is just within some "range". These are less informative, considerably cheaper, but still useful for detecting PSUs that have already "failed". Newegg has several testers to choose from. All these testers contain a "dummy load" to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to a motherboard, and therefore allows the PSU to power on, if able, without being attached to a motherboard - great for testing fans, but again, it is not a true load or suitable for conclusive testing.

Note the required voltage tolerance ranges:

Posted Image
NOTE: Disregard the -5VDC reading. It is no longer used.


Swapping in a known good supply is a tried and true method of troubleshooting used for years, even by pros. If you have access to a suitably sized, spare power supply, carefully remove the suspect supply and replace it with the known good one, and see if the problem goes away.

I do not recommend using a multimeter to test power supplies. To do it properly, that is, under a realistic load, the voltages on all the pins must be measured while the PSU is attached to the motherboard and the computer powered on. This requires poking (with some considerable force) two hard and sharp, highly conductive meter probes into the main power connector, deep in the heart of the computer. One tiny slip can destroy the motherboard, and everything plugged into it. It is not worth the risk considering most multimeters, like plug-in testers, do not measure, or reveal any unwanted and potentially disruptive AC components to the DC voltages.

And remember, anything that plugs into the wall can kill. Do not open the power supply's case unless you are a qualified electronics technician. There are NO user serviceable parts inside a power supply.


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#24
rhymin

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AHAAAAAAAAAA... I think we have found it Watson :D
Look at your +3 and +12 voltages.
Those readings indicate a serious problem with the PSU. In order to verify it please do the following.

Download SIW from HERE and get the Standalone English version
It will install itself and when finished
Then Click on SIW Icon to run program
On the left side click on one at a time of the following and then on the right, copy and paste the information in your next reply



Motherboard Info:

Download SIW from HERE and get the Standalone English version
It will install itself and when finished

Then Click on SIW Icon to run program
On the left side click on the Sensor directory and then on the right, copy and paste the information in your next reply

Here is the copy/pasted stats from Sensors on the left side...I didn't quite understand what you wanted me to copy/paste for the PSU? You said "On the left side click on one at a time of the following and then on the right..." did you leave out a step or two? Thanks again for all your help.

Sensor Value Min Max
BRAD-PC
ITE IT87
Voltages
VIN1 1.63 V 1.63 V 1.63 V
+5V 5.11 V 5.11 V 5.11 V
+12V 4.86 V 4.86 V 4.86 V
-12V -10.11 V -10.11 V -10.11 V
-5V -8.96 V -8.96 V -8.96 V
+5V VCCH 5.11 V 5.11 V 5.11 V
VBAT 3.39 V 3.39 V 3.39 V
Temperatures
TMPIN0 34 C (93 F) 34 C (93 F) 35 C (94 F)
TMPIN1 28 C (82 F) 27 C (80 F) 28 C (82 F)
Fans
FANIN0 3409 RPM 3391 RPM 3426 RPM
Fans PWM
FANPWM0 99 % 99 % 99 %
FANPWM1 99 % 99 % 99 %
FANPWM2 99 % 99 % 99 %
AMD SB6xx/7xx
Voltages
CPU VCore 1.17 V 0.97 V 1.36 V
CPU IO 3.54 V 3.53 V 3.55 V
+12V 12.66 V 12.64 V 12.72 V
AMD Phenom II X4 965
Temperatures
Core #0 34 C (92 F) 33 C (91 F) 38 C (99 F)
Core #1 34 C (92 F) 33 C (91 F) 38 C (99 F)
Core #2 34 C (92 F) 33 C (91 F) 37 C (99 F)
Core #3 34 C (92 F) 33 C (91 F) 37 C (98 F)
Powers
Processor 50.60 W 15.20 W 113.40 W
Radeon HD 5770
Temperatures
GPU Core 46 C (114 F) 45 C (112 F) 46 C (114 F)
Radeon HD 5770
Temperatures
GPU Core 46 C (114 F) 45 C (112 F) 46 C (114 F)
WDC WD5000AAKS-00V0A0
Temperatures
Assembly 28 C (82 F) 27 C (80 F) 28 C (82 F)
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#25
rshaffer61

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+12V 4.86 V 4.86 V 4.86 V

This is what I was talking about. :D
You bought this at the same time you bought the case correct. Your problem has been happening since day one correct?
Your +3 rail isn't even showing up.
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#26
rhymin

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+12V 4.86 V 4.86 V 4.86 V

This is what I was talking about. :D
You bought this at the same time you bought the case correct. Your problem has been happening since day one correct?
Your +3 rail isn't even showing up.


Yes I bought the case and psu a few months ago cause I saw a good deal on the combo, but they have been laying around waiting for this build. I guess it wasn't such a good deal after all lol. The psu had like 3 reviews and was a new product by a company I didn't know much about. Pretty much my fault for not researching enough. Yes this problem has been happening since day one. If I have to get a new psu to get my pc running smoothly then that is certainly fine. If that is the case, what wattage would you recommend for me and brand? I just went with 850W cause I knew it would be more than enough wattage.
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#27
rshaffer61

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Nothing wrong with that wattage but I think it may be overkill to be hones.
I have 3 hd,s a AMD 3.4ghz quad core, 8 gigs of memory and a ATI 5670 video running on a 650 watt PSU with no problem.
First thing I would suggest having yours tested out from a qualified store and technician.
Second your budget is something to consider when purchasing a new PSU.
Thirdly and with all honesty the PSU is one of the main components you should never skimp on with your system. A faulty PSU can cause a electrical short or fire. This can in turn damage other components of your system. ;)
If I were to suggest a PSI you for you it would be this one HERE or this one HERE. ;)
Yes I am a fan of Corsair PSU's because they are reliable and stable.
Check the details on them to make sure they have enough SATA and PCI-E connections for you. ;)
The second one I believe is SLI and Crossfire ready. :D
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#28
rhymin

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Nothing wrong with that wattage but I think it may be overkill to be hones.
I have 3 hd,s a AMD 3.4ghz quad core, 8 gigs of memory and a ATI 5670 video running on a 650 watt PSU with no problem.
First thing I would suggest having yours tested out from a qualified store and technician.
Second your budget is something to consider when purchasing a new PSU.
Thirdly and with all honesty the PSU is one of the main components you should never skimp on with your system. A faulty PSU can cause a electrical short or fire. This can in turn damage other components of your system. ;)
If I were to suggest a PSI you for you it would be this one HERE or this one HERE. ;)
Yes I am a fan of Corsair PSU's because they are reliable and stable.
Check the details on them to make sure they have enough SATA and PCI-E connections for you. ;)
The second one I believe is SLI and Crossfire ready. :D


Thank you for the recommended PSUs, I'm considering the second option you linked since I need crossfire ready. So do you think my old pc could have a psu issue also, or are there a lot of different problems that cause the dreaded blue memory dump screen?

Thank you so much for all of your time and help :(!
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#29
rshaffer61

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Without the old system being connected online and here it would be absurd of me to suggest anything. I will though say that the BSOD you refer to can be caused by several different items including,
  • Memory
  • Hard Drive mechanical state
  • CPU
  • Heat
  • PSU
    [b]Motherboard
  • OS
  • Programs
  • Infection



I would be more then happy to go through that system with you also if you would like.
It would be easier to start a new topic on that system and just pm me the link to the new topic. That way we can keep them separated from each other.
The amount of testing and diagnosing will be the same for the most part if you would like to do it on your own.
I would suggest running the Speedfan and SIW programs first to check the PSU and verifying the results with each other. If that does not show anything then let me know and we can go on to other tests if you would like.
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#30
rhymin

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Thank you so much for all your help man, I really appreciate it. I'm gonna hook up my old pc in a bit and run the program for the psu.
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