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Windows XP getting stuck at startup


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#1
Simon_H

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Hello,

I'm having a real problem with my PC at present. As of yesterday, when I try to start it up, it gets to the black Windows XP screen and will not proceed any further. The small blue bar just keeps scrolling along without anything happening.

Worse still, when I reset the machine and it comes up with that screen that says 'Windows did not shut down properly last time' and gives me options for what to do, none of the options appears to work. Each option leads to a list of white text scrolling up a black screen that all start with things such as 'multi disk rdisk partition WINDOWS System 32 Drivers', and it always then seems to fully freeze on one that says 'agp440.sys' at the end, whether this is of use to anyone or not, I'm not sure.

The PC was working fine just the day before yesterday, and I can't really think of anything I did that might have changed it in anyway. The only out of the ordinary thing I did was to install the Canon software for my new camera, not sure whether that could make a difference?

I'd be hugely grateful for any help or advice that anyone could offer

Thanks,

Simon
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#2
mtiggs

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i have the same problem with mine. what i do is start it up normally, and when it doesn't work, i hold down the power button for 5-7 secconds until it shuts off. then start it up again and then it shoud com up with a screen start windows safe mode, ect. select last current setting that worked and it should load up.
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#3
edge2022

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Here are all your symptoms and a resolution: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324764
If you do not have your Windows CD, then click on Recovery Console Instructions in my sig, and use the burned CD to access the RC. Then continue with the instructions in the article.
If you cannot understand something, or need clarification, post back before you attempt anything.
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#4
Simon_H

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Thanks for the replies, I really appreciate them.

mtiggs, unfortunately I've tied all of the options on the screen that you mention, including 'last known good configuration', and none of them work - they all just freeze the screen.

edge2022, I'll have a look through this advice and get back to you if there's a difficulty, which I can certainly see happening!

Thanks again,

Simon.
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#5
edge2022

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Sure thing. Let me know how it goes, or if you have any questions. :D
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#6
Simon_H

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Hello again,

I do have a couple of questions about this, I don't have a Windows XP disc, so I would have to burn one or even borrow one if possible. Once that's done, I could have a go at the suggested solution - complicated as it sounds to a novice like me!

The question I have though is related to something a colleague told me, that it's possible to hook a second computer up to mine and then copy the contents of my computer onto the second computer by getting it to recognise mine as a kind of external drive, rather than it having to boot up at all. Is this possible, or easy to do? And can it be done if the second computer is a laptop? Would you need specialist cables or software?

The reason I ask is that I think it's high time I actually got a new computer anyway, so an acceptable outcome for me this time would be to extract all my files from my existing PC to a different place, so that at least they are safe?

Thanks,

Simon
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#7
SpywareDr

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Yes, there are all kinds of harddrive-to-usb adapters available starting at about $20 (USD). For example http://www.newegg.co...e=Free Shipping Once you have your old hard drive hooked up to a USB port, you can use Windows Explorer (My Computer) to drag and drop your old files into folders on your new hard drive.
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#8
123Runner

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I will add that you can only back up data such as documents, movies, pictures, etc.
You can "export" your emails if you can get the computer running long enough.
I assume the computer in question is a desktop, so you can remove the drive and put it in an enclosure as SpywareDr suggested, or attach it as a slave in another desktop.
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#9
edge2022

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If you don't have your Windows CD, then try this:

If you do not have your Windows CD, then click on Recovery Console Instructions in my signature (below my post), and use the burned CD to access the RC. Then continue with the instructions in the article.


And, if you want to extract data from your hard drive, you can either slave the old one to the new computer or put it in an enclosure as mentioned before. If the drive is a SATA one, you can just plug it into the motherboard and simply copy your files.
Another option would be to run a Linux Live CD (like Ubuntu or Puppy Linux) and copy the files to an external hard drive. Then you could put the files on your new computer.

btw, are you interested in building a computer? :D
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#10
SpywareDr

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I assume the computer in question is a desktop, so you can remove the drive and put it in an enclosure as SpywareDr suggested, or attach it as a slave in another desktop.


Doesn't matter if it's a desktop or a laptop. 3.5" and 2.5" SATA or PATA hard drives can be attached to a USB port via a simple adapter or in an external enclosure.
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#11
123Runner

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I assume the computer in question is a desktop

This was stated only because it gives the op another choice (to slave it if he/she chooses).
A USB enclosure or adapter is usually the easiest way to go.
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#12
Simon_H

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Hello again, thanks once more for the replies, they are very helpful!

I like the sound of extracting the documents, photos, music, files etc off my desktop PC onto a second computer, as that would save my stuff before I possibly attempt to fix the old computer. So if I understand correctly, I'm to get a 'harddrive to usb' adapter and use that to extract the files. Would I be able to extract the files to any computer, e.g. my parents' laptop that I would borrow for the occasion? Also, I'm not sure I understand what is meant by 'an external enclosure' - I take it I'm to remove the hard-drive and attach it to the adapter. Is there anything else to it? I think that will be the approach I take at first.

Oh, and I'm not sure about building a computer, edge2022, it sounds a bit complicated!

Thanks,

Simon.
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#13
edge2022

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So, your final decision is to extract the files from your hard drive, and move them to a new computer. Correct?
These are external enclosures: http://www.newegg.co...rnal-Enclosures
What you do, is remove the hard drive from your computer and plug it into an enclosure. Then you can plug the enclosure into another computer to transfer the files through a USB or an eSATA connector. The other computer will recognize the enclosure as if it was a mass storage device. To clarify, an enclosure would be what is meant by a hard drive to usb adapter.

Building a computer might sound intimidating at first, but it really is simple once you have done your research. We can always help you with parts selection and putting it together, but, if you are not comfortable doing it, then I suggest you simply buy a new computer.
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#14
SpywareDr

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AFAIC, an enclosure is way too complicated. If you have a SATA laptop hard drive, grab this simple $20 adapter:

Posted Image

plug in the two connectors and that's it, you're done. Start copying files.

(Click the image to take you to the product page on Newegg.com).
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#15
Simon_H

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Thanks once again for the help

Okay perhaps I'll get one of these Apricorn devices, I'll see about hunting one down on a UK website as I'm in England. It does look straightforward though. Just to show my ignorance again, I have to say I have no idea what a SATA laptop hard drive is, though my folks only got the laptop in July (it's a Dell Inspiron if that helps?) so I'm going to guess that it does?

I did a bit of research into new computers in Manchester the other day, I can always factor building a new computer into my research as well, I'll be sure to ask for advice if necessary!

Thanks,

Simon.
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