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eSATA connection jeopardizing RAID process


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#1
Gswiss

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I'm running RAID 1 provided by the microprogramming feature of an ASUS P5Q3 MB on a dual boot xp-sp3/Windows 7. RAID uses two 500GB WD green disks (I since learned these were not recommended for RAID and I am currently replacing the green by black disks). I also have an 800GB WD green disk which is non-RAID.

Everything was running fine for weeks until I connected an external disk to the eSATA plug of the MB. My Windows 7 instantly became sluggish. Rebooting did not change the situation. After a while, I couldn't even get past the ASUS splash screen on reboots.

At one point, I finally got to the Ctrl-I screen where I reset the two RAID drives to non-RAID.

I had already disconnected the eSATA drive so I couldn't tell from the data available whether the system had tried to turn it into a RAID drive. Is that what it was doing? If that's the case, how do you handle eSATA drives in this environment?
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#2
Neil Jones

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Most eSata ports on modern machines actually connect to an internal SATA port on the motherboard. This usually shows up in the BIOS but shouldn't appear anywhere on the board itself.

In its default configuration, most boards will use all SATA ports to make a RAID which, if the above is true, would include the one that drives eSata. Normally you should be able to use the RAID utility to control which SATA ports should form part of the RAID. This is usually an option in the BIOS or an extra sub-BIOS menu, typically accessible by pressing CTRL+S or some other similar keystroke.
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#3
Gswiss

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That's what I did. In the BIOS SATA config, the two RAID disks are specifically designated. The third internal disk is defined as non-RAID. I can't explain why everything became sluggish once I connected the eSATA disk.
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