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Facebook & Twitter Block


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#1
Ngdr

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Twitter and Facebook has been blocked in my office browser. Could you let me know an alternate path to access my accounts?

Do you guys think it's feasible to block these in an advertising agency giving the rise of social media as a widely used marketing tool???
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#2
ViprXX

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I'm sure there are ways to bypass the blocks but you need to ask yourself, is it worth risking your job? If I were you I wouldn't even worry about it. Just wait until you get home to get onto facebook and twitter.
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#3
Ngdr

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Thanks for your response. However, I think it's ridiculous. We aren't really school children and if employers don't trust our self-monitoring ability...shouldn't hire us in the first place.

My issue is that I work in Advertising...I usually ad to my network through these forums as well as keep myself updated through twitter - it's a much easier medium than searching for current news, etc.
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#4
SpywareDr

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GeeksToGo.com > Terms of Use

http://www.geekstogo...tion=boardrules

Your use of this Site constitutes your binding acceptance of these Terms, ...

3. Geeks to Go Support Forum Rules, Policies and Disclaimers

r. We cannot help you get around any administrative restrictions imposed on a school, work or other network not owned and operated by yourself. These restrictions can include (but are not limited to): website blocking/filtering, software installation, email retention, software configuration, network/internet usage, network configuration, forum or chat room restrictions, game server restrictions, or any other actions that are deemed "unauthorized" by the owners/administrators of the network in question.


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#5
ViprXX

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You actually have a very good point. social networks can be very useful in advertising. I'd mention it to your boss and see if you can get the blocks removed. but until then, if your determined to access those social networking sites then the only advise i can give is look into using a proxy server to access facebook and twitter. google is your friend.

good luck
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#6
Crowbar

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Let's look at the other side of this issue, my employer paid me to block social networks. Why? Because a few employees abused our liberal policy. After paying me to try to clean up the mess made by certain employees downloading "my web tattoo" (and other crap, over and over again) that just would not go away, my employer decided to stop letting everyone have free reign with these sites. I know that if the boss says to block something, and an employee tries to circumvent those blocks, unemployment figures would rise slightly in my area. The computers at my job belong to the company, and the company lays down the law, end of story. Just like a bad law in your state, you can always lobby the powers that be to change that law, but if you decide to break the law, then you should be prepared to pay the consequences.

What I tell my unhappy users, is" that's what your smartphones are for", which opens up a whole other issue, but then it's not IT's problem.

Is blocking these sites rediculous? maybe to the responsible user, but there is always a screw-up in the bunch, and when the entire network goes down because some knucklehead downloads a rootkit, everyone is very unhappy, especially the IT guy, who is not yet fully trained in removing it :D
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#7
DonnaB

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Kudos to SpywareDr and Crowbar6761!

Ngdr,

You may find that these restrictions are ridiculous but they are for good intentions. You should respect that. I work for a delivery service that is known Worldwide. I deliver to businesses mainly. One Government Office that I deliver to had at one time access to anything and everything on the Internet. Then one day one of the Secretaries just had to read her E-mail,Facebook, and Twitter acct. and infected the whole network. Took down hundreds of computers! Cost the City big bucks and several days to get back up and running. She lost her job and has to pay not only fines but the cost of recovering from the catastrophe!

Here's another reason restrictions should be applied. This may not pertain to the subject at hand, or does it? Found on the Home page here at Geeks to go a few months ago. Malware just doesn't infect a computer by itself. 99.9% of computer problems sit in front of the screen!

Malware Played a Role in Plane Crash?

Two years ago Spanair flight JK-5022 crashed, killing 154 of 172 on board. According to El Paris (via Google Translate), this was at least in part due to a PC located on the ground in the headquarters of the airline. That computer was supposed to sound an alarm signal when three similar technical problems registered on the same device. While the plane that crashed had accumulated three incidents, they were not registered in time because the system was infected by malware (trojans).

Investigators believe this may be the cause of the crash. The judge said that if these three incidents had been identified earlier, the plane never would have taken off.


If accessing Twitter is that important, I'd suggest as Crowbar6761 had and buy a Smart Phone.

Just my 2 cents! :D
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#8
Ngdr

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Lol. @ Donna...I have a smartphone...I work in advertising...I can't survive being on the go without one.. ;)

I needed access for research on work itself...anywho...spoke to management about it and am getting access to it...I do a lot of strategy and planning for clients and need these sites to be running for me to be able to cost and plan certain media initiatives... ;)

So..problem solved :D

Should be up and running shortly!
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#9
DonnaB

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Hi ndgr,

That's great to hear! Communication can conquer all if you approach it in a fashionable way. Sometimes you just need to vent before you approach.

Have a nice day!

Donna :D
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#10
Drix

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Visiting Facebook is like not washing your hands after visiting a 'quaint' truck stop bathroom in the middle of nowhere right before dinner, you are taking a risk.

According to BitDefender, 20% of Facebook profiles include links to malware. With Facebook's population of over 500 million users that means there are over 100,000,000 pages that contain those poisoned links.


Panda Security released a study that found...

A new study found that a third of small and medium businesses have suffered from such attacks, with Facebook cited as the number one source. And the attacks can cost a lot more than the price of new antivirus software. About a third of businesses that were attacked lost $5,000 or more; 10% lost $25,000 or more.


Most companies assign someone to deal with their social media presence, outside of them the access should be restricted. Company property. End of discussion.

{EDIT}

I'm glad to hear things were resolved in a mutually agreeable way. Be careful! :D

Edited by Drix, 02 December 2010 - 07:07 PM.

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