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Can I request a new IP


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#1
Incoming

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So basically as the title says, I want to change my external IP.

This is NOT /flushdns, that is internal I believe.

I can't reset my router because it doesn't change.

Reason being people have been threatening to ddos me for a long time for no apparent reason and I'd like to cut connections with them with a new IP.

I've been told to call my ISP but I don't know how they will react to a fifteen year old calling them.

Thoughts?
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#2
D-Berd

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Don't worry about it, because the people threatening you are probably 13 year old kids that have no clue.

http://searchsecurit...i557336,00.html
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#3
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Actually he hit me off once and it somehow took out my whole entire phone as well when we reset the router, it's not 13 year olds :D
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#4
Spyderturbo007

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I tried this before and was basically told to take a hike by my ISP at the time. I have since switched. When I used to have Comcast, I noticed one day that someone was running a port scan on my IP for about 5 hours. I called my ISP and asked for a different external IP address and was promptly told that they don't do that. He told me my only option was to turn off my router for a couple days and hope that when I fire it back up that I don't get the same address. No thanks.

In the end I had to block all traffic from that particular IP. Then again, maybe your ISP will have something different to say. I would give them a call.
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#5
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Fortunately I don't have Comcast.

I lied.

-.-
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#6
D-Berd

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And your probably 13.....Ok, 13 1/2 :D
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#7
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I'm 15.. but my age is really irrelevant as it IS the internet. Knowledge varies, everyone knows something someone doesn't :D

Edited by Incoming, 07 December 2010 - 09:16 PM.

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#8
calvert

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over here in the uk, most isp's allocate dynamic ip addresses for home users,

all we need to do is switch the router off and the address is released, switch it back on and we are assigned an unallocated address,

its worth a try,

just as a note, i have allocated my pc a static address and associated it with my mac address, this in no way interferes with the address supplied by my isp, as its internal and nothing to do with the internet,

you can find more info here

http://www.whatismyip.com/

(bookmark the page > note your address > switch off your router for a minute > restart > check with the page again)
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#9
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I can't reset my router because it doesn't change.


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#10
Troy

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You should be able to request a new IP if your plan includes a static IP. I have done this before for a business client, I personally don't think it was warranted but I just did what my boss told me to do. ;)

If your plan does not have a static IP (i.e. IP is dynamic) then it is exactly that, dynamic, and it can change.

You have not said what type of internet connection you have, here in Australia I mostly work with clients who have ADSL. On just about every modem I have used, there is a setting on the modem's interface to specifically choose what your WAN IP Address is going to be. Default setting is AUTO. So when I change the AUTO address to the actual IP address that is statically set, it still works. If I set it to a different IP Address, it actually stopped working.

So my point is if you have this type of setup (and a dynamic IP Address), then you could try manually "guessing" another IP address in the range of your ISP's allocated IP Addresses. If you hit one that is not in use then hopefully it will work? Sounds like fun to try, I would be interested to see if it works. I have a mailserver at home myself (hence static IP) so I can't test it out myself.

Otherwise if your ISP plan is static and they don't change it then that is poor service. I would change ISP and never look back.

However, two other comments come to mind.

1) ipconfig /flushdns from the command prompt actually does not change your internal IP address. You might be thinking of /release and /renew, which half the time it gives you the same one back anyway.
2) What on earth are you doing in the first place to attract unwanted DDoS attention? :D
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#11
calvert

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I can't reset my router because it doesn't change.


i know, i read it

you are not reseting your router - you are just switching it off and on,
the point of a dynamic ip is that there should always be a free one for you to use - this is the main one for normal home users

there is a little pin-hole somewhere on the body of your router - this is the reset,
using this will reset your router back to default settings
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#12
SpywareDr

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Since your ISP is the one that assigns your external IP Address, they are the only ones that can change it.

The vast majority of ISP equipment is setup to automatically hand out dynamic IP Addresses. (No human intervention allowed). Even if you reset your router, if the last IP Address you were using is still available from your ISP, that's the one you'll more often than not end up with again.

You ISP's equipment identifies you by your router's MAC Address. This is registered with them the very first time you login as a new customer. If you change your router, (or attempt to spoof a different MAC Address), you'll need to re-register this new MAC Address as belonging to your account before you'll be allowed access to the internet through their equipment.

Note that many ISPs also offer a static IP Address for a small monthly charge, (usually from $5.00 to $15.00). Your router's MAC Address will then be (semi)-permanently attached to a (different) single IP Address that will not change ... unless you request a change of course.
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#13
dsenette

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I can't reset my router because it doesn't change.


i know, i read it

you are not reseting your router - you are just switching it off and on,
the point of a dynamic ip is that there should always be a free one for you to use - this is the main one for normal home users

there is a little pin-hole somewhere on the body of your router - this is the reset,
using this will reset your router back to default settings

you don't have to reset a router to default settings to get a new public ip address (in fact, unless it's a modem/router combo, doing anything to the router is useless in this situation, as the modem is the device that's got the public IP)


turning your modem off for a few days MAY get you a new IP address, but it might not. if your ISP has more IPs in it's control than it has customers (which it should) then the likely hood of you keeping the same IP address forever is actually somewhat high. if your modem requests an IP and no one else has had the need to take the one you were using, then it's probably going to just get the same IP over and over again.
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#14
calvert

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ok, if thats the case then why did i have an ip address of 2.99.246.216 (rochdale, manchester) less than 2 mins ago,
switched my router off then back on (not my pc though)

and now i have an ip address of 2.99.254.19 (manchester, manchester)

its now peak time here,

i have a dynamic ip - all home users have a dynamic ip here in the uk, all isp's i have been with do it this way,

all i am saying is give it a try,

i have an adsl gateway - so its an integrated modem,

my apologies if its done different in other countries
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#15
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Well what I do is I unplug something, wait a minute, then plug it back in?

It's a tiny hole like you said ^^
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