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A:\ is not accessable


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#1
jsullivan_33403

jsullivan_33403

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Get the following message when I attempt to go to the floppy drive [was working fine in the past].

"A:\ is not accessable, no ID address mark was found on the floppy disk."
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#2
garfin59

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Check Device Manager and see if the driver is there and enabled.

Start >> Run.

In Run type devmgmt.msc, click OK.

In Device Manager expand the "Floppy disk controllers". Double-click the listing for "Standard floppy disk controller" to open it's 'properties'.

In the 'General' tab see if the device is enabled. Also check to see if there are any error codes. Sometimes reinstalling the driver will correct the problem.

To reinstall click on the 'Driver' tab and click on 'Uninstall'. When asked to verify, click OK.

Restart your computer. Windows will automatically install the driver.

Also you may want to open the case and check the connections of the floppy drive.
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#3
phillipcorcoran

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It's often a sign that the floppy drive has failed and needs replacing (always has been the case with friends computers I've repaired when they got that error). By all means check the connections at the back of the floppy drive, but it's unlikely they will become disconnected on their own if you or anyone else hasn't been working inside the case recently.

It's also a slim possibility that the magnetic read/write heads have become built up with debris over time. At one time you could buy a cleaning disk for them but not sure if they'll still be available now that floppies are rarely used.
With the relatively low price of a new drive, it's hardly worth the hassle of trying to fix an old one by any method.

Edited by phillipcorcoran, 08 December 2010 - 03:33 PM.

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