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xPUD


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#1
Spyderturbo007

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I was reading over the Malware Removal Forum because like they say about the PGA tour, "These guys / gals are good!". :D

Anyway, I ran across this post by Essexboy and had a question. If I'm reading that correctly, that program will allow you to use a restore point when you are unable to boot the system or when system restore fails to work inside of Windows? Am I reading that right?

Can anyone explain how that program works? Does anyone know what steps you take after what is posted to allow the restore to be completed? Apparently the scan showed that there were no restore points available, so the rest of the instructions were not posted.
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#2
dsenette

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while i haven't used xPUD myself, i do understand what's going on (i think)

xPUD is simply a bootable linux environment that allows you to run an OS from a disk or USB drive without having to install it on the system. the rst.sh is a shell script that performs a file opperation which seems to be looking for a restore point. if it finds one it (in theory) allows you to restore to that without having to boot into windows (by actually doing the file copy itself, which is all system restore does).

as for what to do if it does find restore points...dunno i've not used it.
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#3
Spyderturbo007

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Maybe it's something I can play around with on one of my virtual machines? Now I just have to remember how to mount an image with VMWare. Providing that you can mount an image on a USB stick with that software. :D
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#4
dsenette

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well, with vmware server, if you do everything to get all of the required stuff over on the USB, you just set the client to mount usb devices when they're attached.
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