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building a gaming computer ~$900. Suggestions?


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#1
rex_rhade

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Basics: I am a computer science major in DE. I only have a little experience with handling computer hardware and I would like to build a desktop computer. I have around $900 to work with.

I was suggested these parts:
-Antec Sonata III Case with 500W Power Supply
-ASUS P7P55D-E Pro ATX Intel Motherboard
-EVGA GeForce 9500 GT 01G-P3-N959-TR Video Card
-Intel Core i7-860 2.8GHz LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Processor
-G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory x 2 (for a total of 8GB);
-OCZ Vertex 2 OCZSSD3-2VTX120G 3.5" MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
-Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1.5TB 3.5" SATA 3.0Gb/s Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
-LITE-ON DVD Writer - Bulk - Black SATA Model iHAS224-06 LightScribe Support

I want to use a HDD rather than an SSD, unless there is a great deal or if solid state drives are significantly cheaper now.

I would like to build a computer with the capabilities to run things such as creating flash animations, picture editing, midi editing, and programming environments for designing software, gaming software in particular.

I also want the capability to run games such as Portal 2 and World of Warcraft at great speeds and rendering.

Any help in recommended parts or a certain brand/types that would be helpful for what I want as capabilities. Also any opinions on if I should stick with what was suggested or if I can use different/better parts or for better deals would be appreciated.

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edit:
I've done a little more research and have these parts in mind:
CPU: Intel Core i5-2500 Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor http://www.newegg.co...b3772d6af182c01

MoBo: ASRock P67 PRO3 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.co...3d0325e89253d02

RAM: Kingston HyperX Blu 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model KHX1600C9D3B1K2/4GX
http://www.newegg.co...9281269754e9a8b

GPU: Galaxy 57NKH3HS00GZ GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit DDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
http://www.newegg.co...999acae0b8b1c39

PSU: NZXT HALE 90 HALE90-650-M 650W ATX 12V v2.2, EPS 12V v2.91 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
http://www.newegg.co...ab38fbc853a2ff6

HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 ST31500341AS 1.5TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
http://www.newegg.co...401c22cdc73605d

what do you think?

Edited by rex_rhade, 20 January 2011 - 04:08 PM.

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#2
ElliotFriend

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Since, you're getting a motherboard with SATA 6Gb/s built in, you should really consider getting a 6Gb/s hard drive to go along with it.

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16822136767

On this particular one, you'll be sacrificing .5 TB, but I don't think you'll miss it, and I'd say the performance boost is worth it.
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#3
rex_rhade

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okay. here's a final list before I go through with this. Let me know if anything is off or needs changed:

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K
Newegg.com - Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K
(which I plan to overclock in a couple years)

MoBo: ASRock P67 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Newegg.com - ASRock P67 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

GPU: EVGA 01G-P3-1366-TR GeForce GTX 460 SE (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
Newegg.com - EVGA 01G-P3-1366-TR GeForce GTX 460 SE (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

HDD: Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Newegg.com - Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
(Is this investment better than the 3.0Gb/s drive that's $10 less?)

RAM: I have three choices, not sure which one is more reliable..
(1)Kingston HyperX Blu 4GB (Newegg.com - Kingston HyperX Blu 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model KHX1600C9D3B1K2/4GX)
(2)G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 4GB (Newegg.com - G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBXL)
(3)G.SKILL 4GB (Newegg.com - G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ)

PSU: CORSAIR Enthusiast Series CMPSU-650TX 650W
Newegg.com - CORSAIR Enthusiast Series CMPSU-650TX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply

CASE: COOLER MASTER HAF 922
Newegg.com - COOLER MASTER HAF 922 RC-922M-KKN1-GP Black Steel + Plastic and Mesh Bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

all boils out to around $850. I think it's a solid build with potential upgrade when I OC it in a couple years. Thoughts or comments are greatly appreciated.
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#4
rex_rhade

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also, what's the difference between a 64 MB cache and 32 MB cache in a HDD?
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#5
ElliotFriend

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also, what's the difference between a 64 MB cache and 32 MB cache in a HDD?


It's more or less the same difference between a 32-bit processor and a 64-bit processor. Basically, the HDD Controller can process 32MB or 64MB of data at a time.

(Is this investment better than the 3.0Gb/s drive that's $10 less?)




This is just a choice that you'll have to make between speed and capacity. There's no right answer, just your personal preference.


RAM is a lot like a commodity, these days. There are a lot of brands, and (almost) all of them will stand up pretty similarly. Kingston and G.SKILL are two solid brands, any of them will serve you well. I'd say it's worth noting that your G.SKILL Ripjaws are designed specifically for your Sandy Bridge CPU.


One more thing you may want to consider is a non-stock CPU Heatsink. Even if you're not overclocking yet, gaming can really run up the CPU heat. I got this one for my Core 2 Quad, and it's a night & day difference. The processor used to run up to 55-60 just at a typical operating load. Now it keeps around 35-40. It was really worth the investment!


Nice choice on the case, by the way!! Looks really solid!
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#6
cathudog

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Did you build this system yet going to build one myself on the Sandy Bridge Cpu and the P67 board myself for about $1000.00 good luck.
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#7
iammykyl

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[quote][/(Is this investment better than the 3.0Gb/s drive that's $10 less?)
quote]

You won't find a manufacturer claiming
peak throughput about 600 MB/s only that it complies with the standard
SATA Revision 3.0 (SATA 6 Gbit/s)
SSD is another matter, see below..


"While even the fastest conventional hard disk drives can barely saturate the original SATA 1.5 Gbit/s bandwidth, Solid-State Drives have already saturated the SATA 3 Gbit/s limit at 285 MB/s net read speed and 250 MB/s net write speed with the Sandforce 1200 and 1500 controller. However SandForce SSD controllers scheduled for release in 2011 have delivered 500 MB/s read/write rates,[12] and ten channels of fast flash can reach well over 500 MB/s with new ONFI drives –" full article, > http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Serial_ATA

You build would be better with a much smaller OS drive and a large Data drive.
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