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Hard Drive Failed


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#1
Colmesperanza

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Hi!
My Hard drive can't be detected by my dell laptop,
I took it out and connected it to a desktop but still no luck.
It's making strange noises. Surely there's a mechanical problem.
Is there any chance of getting my files off?
What's the best option!
Thanks
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#2
rshaffer61

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If the drive cannot be detected then the only way to retrieve your data would be through a professional data recovery company which could cost as much as 1000USD to do.
By making sound are you saying like a clicking noise?
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#3
Colmesperanza

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that's exactly what i mean!
very occasionally when i attach it to my desktop a little thing comes up in the corner "new hardware detected"
but I can never see it anywhere to get my files!
I guess it's gone for good so, a pity but it could have been worse and a lesson learned the hard way!
Thanks for your reply
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#4
rshaffer61

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The clicking noise you may be hearing is commonly called The Click Of Death and signifies the drive is or has failed. Mechanically the drive has failed and when it first started would have been the time to do a immediate backup of all data and replace the drive. Just a little information in case it happens again.
This is one of those times when immediate action has to be taken. I am sorry we couldn't have assisted you before it actually failed. :D
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#5
Log2

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Also just to be sure, try using a USB Hard drive seat to see if the Hard drive will work with that, it will be connected via USB rather than SATA and doesn't need to be registered with the system, so it's more likely to work with that than being connected Via USB
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#6
SpywareDr

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Also just to be sure, try using a USB Hard drive seat to see if the Hard drive will work with that, it will be connected via USB rather than SATA and doesn't need to be registered with the system, so it's more likely to work with that than being connected Via USB

"connected via USB rather than SATA"? How? The hard drive only has a SATA connector.

Also, please explain how adding an additional USB layer to the mix is going to improve your chances of recovering files. Seems to me that not only does it complicate matters, it's also going to s-l-o-w things way down. (SATA 2.0 is 6.25 times faster than USB 2.0).
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#7
SpywareDr

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What's the best option!


http://www.ontrack.com

(Warning: It can get expen$ive. But, if you 'gotta have' your files ...).
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#8
Log2

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It doesn't complicate the issue at all, it makes it so the HDD doesn't spin up on POST so that you can access the files directly on the hard drive rather than the hard drive making it's own drive in windows. You can also use a method called Hot Plugging, which is where you connect the hard drive after the post, but I consider this way much safer, and I've used it myself many times with great success, as I do own a computer shop, and people always want their files recovered.

Anyway, here's what they look like: http://www.tigerdire...ard Drive Docks

And having said all that, there is no guarantee that it will work, but you can find them for under 40 bucks, so might as well spend 40 before spending 1000.

Also in my shop, I use a network recovery tool, as I have a server to store it all, however, I've used EASEUS Data Recovery Wizard, and it works like a charm. So take a look at those options before spending the minimum 1000 dollar recovery charge
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#9
rshaffer61

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A cheaper way is to use a Linux Live cd to access the data but there again that depends on the drive being seen in the bios.
If the drive is not seen it does not matter what is used the drive is probably mechanically dead.
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#10
Log2

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Yes, that would work if you can see the Hard drive in the BIOS, and just to add to rshaffer61's great idea, here is a tutorial that can walk you through how to do it:

http://www.geekstogo...over-your-data/
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#11
SpywareDr

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There is only one connector on a SATA hard drive, and it is not USB.
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#12
Log2

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Lol wow... you don't know much about hardware do you?

There is clearly a link in my second last post showing you a device that makes it so you can connect it to USB, but good for you, thinking you know how to respond in a forum

Edited by Log2, 09 February 2011 - 01:20 PM.

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#13
dsenette

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alright, that's enough.

if the hard drive has mechanically failed, it doesn't matter if you use unicorn hairs to connect to it, it's not going to work. so your argument is nullified.

if the drive isn't detected in bios, it's probably (99.9%) toasted. so usb or sata connection becomes irrelevant

SpywareDr, you're right, the drive only has a SATA connection, however, what Log2 is suggesting is to use a sata to USB converter of some kind (external HD enclosure, drive dock, whatever).

Log2, booting into linux, mounting the drive after post, or standing on your head while you plug the drive in won't make a failed drive start working. if the drive won't detect in bios, the likely hood of it detecting correctly via usb is still REALLY slim
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#14
SpywareDr

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Exactly. If it doesn't work via a direct connection to its SATA port, attempting to attach it with some type of USB adapter is simply a waste of time.

But hey, it's his life, his time, and here's hoping he's having fun knocking himself out. :D
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#15
dsenette

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didn't i just tell you it was enough? do you read the things that are posted to you? my last post here was a direct statement that the egotistical bickering should stop. i do not like the tone of your last post especially in the context of my last post.

if an admin tells you it's enough, it's enough and you need to change your tone or simply shut up.

have a nice vacation while you reconsider the way you want to participate on this forum
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