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Weird Static Very Loud Noise


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#1
ilanesku

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hey all,
kinda new here.. but i really need help and i have no idea what to do.

i have a new computer(4 month) and about 2 month ago it started occasionally(twice a week) making really loud static voice (it's like a buzzing sound)
when i listen to it, it comes from the processor/pciE area.

ever since, the sound just became more frequent. the noise only happen when the computer is working hard (Video Games\full HD movies)
if i restart the computer the sound will stop for a couple of hours.
now every time i start a game the noise begins,computer restarts not helping anymore, the sounds just gets back as soon i torn the game on

it's definetly not the fans.
i have 4 fans inside the computer.
i switched them off and the sound didn't stop.

i have an amd athelon quad, 2 gigs of ram and 2 video card.
ati 4550hd on board, ati 5450hd pciE slot.
and 550W power supply

iv'e looked all over and couldn't find a solution..

any suggestions?
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#2
Digerati

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With the computer running and side off, can you pinpoint the source of the noise? I would look for wires interfering with fans. Move them out of the way. You should be able to hear where it is coming from. You might stick your ear to the back of the power supply to see, or hear if coming from there.

In any case, do not wait too long before notifying the maker since it is likely still under warranty.
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#3
ilanesku

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i think it's coming from the processor.

its not the fan..
and it's definitly not the power supply.

i stopped the cpu fan and the buzzing continued..
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#4
Digerati

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i think it's coming from the processor.

Not likely. There are no moving parts or other parts to come loose. Momentarily touch the center hub of the other hands and if a fan, the sound will change. Note there are many capacitors surrounding the CPU socket, they some times whine.

Do you smell any burnt electronics smell?
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#5
ilanesku

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Not likely. There are no moving parts or other parts to come loose. Momentarily touch the center hub of the other hands and if a fan, the sound will change. Note there are many capacitors surrounding the CPU socket, they some times whine.

Do you smell any burnt electronics smell?


no.. no burnt smell at all

it is some kind of high pitched electrical whine..
ive heard about cases where the processor itself made a noise.. but was unable to find any sulution.
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#6
Digerati

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I think I would make sure I had a good backup of all my critical data. I have heard about whistling CPUs before - but never heard one myself. And in researching it, I could never find any reference to anything specific. My suspicions are the "rumor" of CPUs producing high-pitched sounds came from many users incorrectly calling the entire computer case the "CPU". And the noise was coming from inside the computer case, not the CPU.

I have had, however, more than one hard drive that obviously had a bad motor because they would produce a high pitch whine - new drives too. Note drives typically spin at 5400 or 7200RPM. If you power down the computer and unplug from the wall, then touch bare metal to discharge static, you can carefully unplug the power connectors from the hard drive(s). Then power up the computer and listen. If no noise, you know it is your drive.
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