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#46
echet

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1) USB 3.0 - sounds like it is supposed to plug directly into the back of the motherboard? Either way if you don't need it you could leave it disconnected. Or if you are able, leave a PCI slot cover off (one that is not needed) so it can run out the back through there and connect it up, or going a step again you could manually drill a hole in one of the PCI slot covers so that it's just enough for the cable to fit through and still have it mostly covered up.


That's the only thing that makes sense, but at the same time doesn't make sense. Who builds a computer with an internal cord coming out the back of the case to be plugged in?

I've also encounter a (major) roadblock today. I was harvesting my old (current) PC for parts and apparently the disk drives don't have SATA connections. I knew the HDD was SATA and assumed the others did to, but the back of the DVD drives have a 40-pin ports. I looked into IDE/SATA adapters but it's (much) cheaper to buy DVD drives. Not much luck finding a SATA floppy, though, so I may just go without until I get a converter.

One of my Motherboards came with an extra USB and Fire wire bracket which would fit in a PCI outlet at the back of the PC, It has a female plug so would fit on pins on the Mobo or could be connected to a male socket.

You did make sure that the pre installed standoffs in the case matched exactly the screw holes in the motherboard and that there were no extra ones left over?
If one is left there it is the most common fault for a PC NOT to post as it causes a fault and the computer shuts down, usually within 1 or 2 seconds.


I did use most of the extra standoffs to fill in the holes that didn't have one. I have a couple left over, but all the screw-holes in the motherboard now have a standoff underneath them.
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#47
iammykyl

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[quote][I did use most of the extra standoffs to fill in the holes that didn't have one./quote]\

Just so we are not talking at cross purposes and to be absolutely clear.
If your Motherboard has 9 screw holes, there must be ONLY 9 standoffs in the case, NO extra ones.

Floppy drive controllers are seldom found on modern Mobos, even if you try to use a so called USB floppy + card reader, the card reader works vie USB but you still need a floppy controller on the Mobo. Window 7 64bit is mot compatible with a floppy drive.

Don't no if this solution works, but starts to get expensive, > http://www.newegg.co...ID=m77p6mpkzyb7
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#48
echet

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There are 9 screw holes in the motherboard and there are 9 standoffs currently in the case. 6 were pre-installed, and I screwed in 3 more but there is still one extra that is loose. It's probably just a spare.
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#49
iammykyl

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There are 9 screw holes in the motherboard and there are 9 standoffs currently in the case. 6 were pre-installed, and I screwed in 3 more but there is still one extra that is loose. It's probably just a spare.


Great, exactly what I wanted to hear. One over, yes, just a spare.
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#50
Troy

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Window 7 64bit is mot compatible with a floppy drive.

Mine works perfectly fine :)
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#51
iammykyl

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Troy. Thank you for pointing that out. Can't find out where I got the info from but obvious wrong.

echet. Sorry for mis informing you.
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#52
echet

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Don't worry about it. I'm a long way from dealing with that anyway.
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#53
echet

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When installing the SSD and HDD, does it matter how they are set up if you want, for example the SSD to be the C drive, or is that determined during OS or BIOS setup?

Also, some of my SATA cables have different labels at one end. 2 say ESATA, 2 say HDD and the other 2 say SATA. The ESATA ones don't fit into any devices, so I know I can't use those, but the HDD ones have an angled end and can't fit into the SSD the way I positioned it. If I use the SATA plug, that means I need to use one of the HDD ones in a DVD drive. Would this work or should I re-locate my SSD so the plug labelled HDD fits?

Edited by echet, 18 May 2011 - 02:10 PM.

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#54
Troy

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Well actually let me clarify. I do have an internal floppy drive in my desktop at home but I haven't had it connected internally for quite some time. But I am pretty sure I have used it with 64-bit Windows 7 previously. Might be a good idea to plug it in and double check. I do need to spend a few moments and clean up my tower at home anyway, the sides are off and cables are everywhere. I should clean it up a bit.

What I do know for fact is that I have used a USB floppy drive with Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 x64 editions.
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#55
iammykyl

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When installing the SSD and HDD, does it matter how they are set up if you want, for example the SSD to be the C drive, or is that determined during OS or BIOS setup?


Determined during installation of the OS. Install the OS on the SSD drive.

Don't know which Mobo you ended up with but, if not instructed otherwise in the SSD or Mobo manual, connect to the SATA 6G port 0 or 1, connect the HDD to SATA 3G.

The connection on both ends of the SATA cable are identical, one end is just cranked to direct the cable down or up. > http://pinouts.ru/HD...TA_pinout.shtml On my P5Q deluxe I have the cranked end plugged into the Mobo.

The HDD SATA cable has the same pin out but I think it is longer so it can reach to the top front of the case.

Try to leave the HDD bay opposite the video card slot empty. This will help with connection, or a long card.
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#56
echet

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When installing the SSD and HDD, does it matter how they are set up if you want, for example the SSD to be the C drive, or is that determined during OS or BIOS setup?


Determined during installation of the OS. Install the OS on the SSD drive.

Don't know which Mobo you ended up with but, if not instructed otherwise in the SSD or Mobo manual, connect to the SATA 6G port 0 or 1, connect the HDD to SATA 3G.

The connection on both ends of the SATA cable are identical, one end is just cranked to direct the cable down or up. > http://pinouts.ru/HD...TA_pinout.shtml On my P5Q deluxe I have the cranked end plugged into the Mobo.

The HDD SATA cable has the same pin out but I think it is longer so it can reach to the top front of the case.

Try to leave the HDD bay opposite the video card slot empty. This will help with connection, or a long card.


I have a Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7-B3. The manual for it isn't specific, and the SSD didn't come with any documentation. Wouldn't pluging the HDD into the SATA 3G make it significantly slower?

Which ones (SATA 3G or SATA 6G) should I plug my optical drives into?

I have the bays opposite the video card empty, with the HDD/SSD below and the optical drives at the top.
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#57
iammykyl

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I have the bays opposite the video card empty, with the HDD/SSD below and the optical drives at the top.

That's how I would have set them up

Which ones (SATA 3G or SATA 6G) should I plug my optical drives into?


Use the SATA 3G.

Wouldn't pluging the HDD into the SATA 3G make it significantly slower?


Possable not, it depends on who's SSD and which generation but, you should connect to the 6G in case the SSD is able to take advantage of it.

This website shows the advantage of 6G on one SSD. This site is a bit flaky, I have to keep refreshing to get the pages to load properly,

> http://hothardware.c...-Review/?page=6

This site may be of use to you, take a little time and have a good look around it, > http://thessdreview....eginners-guide/
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#58
echet

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I had a got think I got it all set up and running without problems. In fact, I'm posting from it now.

At first, I made the mistake of installing Windows onto my HDD rather than the SSD. Dumb, I know. And after going through setup to delete the partitions and trying to install it correctly, I had a ton of problems. The first install got corrupted somehow and Windows wouldn't load properly. I think it was because I started doing stuff with it *mainly trying to install my Wi-Fi adapters drivers before the the drivers and other stuff on the CD that came with the motherboard. The next time I tried installing the OS, I got error message like "Windows cannot be installed on this partition" and then "Windows cannot format the partition on Disk 0. Error code 0x80070057." For archive's sake, if anyone came across this topic though Google looking for a solution, I found a few topics on various hardware forums. I can't find the links to them now, but here's what worked for me. Disconnect all drives except for the SSD you want to install to and on CD/DVD to run the installation CD. In the Wondows installation program, format every partition on the drive, create a new partition that is the full size of the drive, then install.

After Windows was up and running, I connected the HDD and found that, while it was recognized in the device manager, it couldn't be found under My Computer as a useable drive. After much Googling, I managed to assign a letter to the drive through Disk Management and now it works perfectly.

I've got the motherboard's chipset/drivers installed, the graphics card drivers installed, the Wi-Fi adapter, and I made some of the recommended tweaks for running an Windows 7 on an SSD, such as moving My Documents, My Pictures, etc to the data drive.

So there's only a few things left to do now.

First, I'd like to ask about CPU temps. In the BIOS, the CPU temp is listed at 87 degrees C. I know that thermal paste takes a while to start working. The kind I bought says about 200 hours and that the computer should be cycled on and off to go from different extreme temps during that time. The question is, at what point should I start noticing a change? I turned the computer on for the first time on Friday, but it was a little over a week before then that I attached the heatsink to the CPU to the Motherboard, and I'm concerned that I somehow missed the window of getting the paste to work effectively. What is the ideal or acceptable range temps? When should I give up and remove the heatsink and try to attach it again with a new layer?

The only other things left to do are:
- Cable management. I definitely see what Troy was talking about in prior post regarding not having much room to work in the Antec 1200. My video card is huge and spans almost to the back of the drive bay cages. As such, most of the cables that have to span from top to bottom are horseshoed around the video card and need to be tied up somehow.
- Put the sides of the case back on.
- Connect printer and second monitor.
- Install Anti-virus/Security software.
- Migrate data/apps from older hard drives.
- Some other stuff I probably forgot about.

Can anyone think of something important that I missed?
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#59
Troy

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Disable Windows 7 defrag schedule, it will be on by default from install.

87 degrees celsius is far too high. My computer is set to warn me if it hits 70. The most common cause for temperatures this high (that I've found) is the CPU heatsink is incorrectly installed. Usually this is near impossible to tell until you pull the whole motherboard out and see on the underside that one or more of the pins has not come through and fastened properly.
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#60
echet

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I downloaded both Core Temp and Speed Fan for a second (and thrid) opinion and both are reporting that core temps are around 50 degrees. Next time I reboot, I'll check what the BIOS says to see if it actually cooled down or if there is some discrepancy. 87 is pretty hot and I don't feel any heat coming the cpu heatsink area so maybe that's either wrong or it the temp has settled down.
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