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New Motherboard Installed - Keyboard and Mouse Not Working


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#1
rickmr

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Hi,

I recently installed a new PSU and Motherboard into my PC after a probable failed PSU fried my old motherboard.

On installation of the motherboard, everything booted up correctly and I proceeded to install the drivers. When installing the graphics drivers for the system, it reverted to a low resolution and the system rebooted as it was meant to. However on restart I found that my USB wireless mouse and keyboard had stopped working. This includes accessing the BIOS.

I have attempted to use two further wired USB keyboards, several USB mice all in different USB ports, two PS/2 keyboards and a PS/2 mouse all with no success, no lights on the keyboards and mice. Nothing. I've also tried resetting the BIOS with the jumpers on the motherboard to no avail.

My system requires me to press ctrl alt delete in order to get into it and then input a password, so I'm a bit stuck now without any keyboard.

I'm running XP home and have installed an Asrock N68C-S-UCC motherboard.

Does anyone have any ideas on what I could try?

Thanks :)
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#2
Digerati

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It sounds like something else besides the motherboard blew. :) Perhaps RAM or the CPU. And unfortunately, it now sounds like this 2nd PSU may be having problems.

Did you do a fresh install of Windows? I would remove any extra drives, devices, and all but one stick of RAM while trying to sort this out.
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#3
rickmr

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I'm pretty sure that the problem isn't with the PSU. The system starts up but then stops at the ctrl alt delete stage. Would the PSU being at fault allow this? I'm not getting any random switching off as I was with my old PSU any more.

I've not tried using a different processor (I'd need to purchase a new one for this) or using one memory stick. Would an issue with the processor or memory cause this do you think?

And no, I didn't do a fresh reinstall :)

(Sorry for all the questions, I'm a mere amateur at this sort of stuff!).
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#4
Digerati

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The system starts up but then stops at the ctrl alt delete stage

From here, that could mean several things, so we really need you to define that better.

I understand you feel your new power supply is good, and it might be - should be. But you said earlier there were no lights on the keyboards or mice. That's a red flag for me and I would want to be certain I'm starting the troubleshooting process with good power.

a probable failed PSU fried my old motherboard.

It is not rare for a PSU to be taken out by something it supplies power too. It does not have to be the PSU that fails first. The PSU can be collateral damage. And so can every new PSU you stick in there. :)


And no, I didn't do a fresh reinstall

Well, this is tricky with a couple concerns. First, if the Windows license for XP installed on that HD is an OEM license, that means it came with the "original" hardware - specifically the motherboard. The ONLY legal way to legally transfer an OEM license to a new motherboard is if the original motherboard failed AND you are replacing the motherboard with the identical brand and model number, or the maker's recommended model number if the original is out of production. If you decided to "upgrade" the motherboard in the process to a more powerful and current model, that requires a new license. You can replace everything else, just not the motherboard because that is the "mother" board - the "mainboard".

Software makers, not just Microsoft, view an upgraded motherboard as a new computer, and therefore needs a new license.

If you have a full "retail" license of Windows - then no problems. You can transfer as many times as you want. Just don't have it installed on two computers at a time.

I'm just the messenger pointing out the legal facts.

***

The other problem with moving that installation of Windows over to a new motherboard is all the drivers for the many devices on the motherboard have changed. Windows is no longer configured to use that hardware. Some is no big deal as Windows can use generic. But some may too specific, causing Windows to choke. So I usually recommend a fresh install when swapping out so many different hardware devices at one time. And besides, with a format, it ensures you are not starting out with tons of orphaned junk on your drive.

(Sorry for all the questions, I'm a mere amateur at this sort of stuff!).

No need to apologize. Asking questions and learning is what forums are all about. I am just sorry I cannot say click this and you are fixed. But when two or more major components from a failed computer are replaced at the same time, it is difficult to determine what happened in the first place, let alone what is happening now. These are one of those times I would like the computer physically on my bench where I can touch and feel it - plus I have lots of spare expendable parts laying around to work with.
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#5
rickmr

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Hi,

thanks for getting back to me

The system starts up but then stops at the ctrl alt delete stage

From here, that could mean several things, so we really need you to define that better.


When I originally installed the motherboard, the system started up fine first time, I pressed ctrl alt delete to enable me to input my password in order to get to my desktop and install the new drivers. The new drivers required several restarts and each time I was able to log in without any issues. After the graphics drivers had been installed, the system restarted and that's when I started encountering this issue. I'm not sure if this is a driver issue though as the keyboard seems dead even beofre Windows starts to load.

I understand you feel your new power supply is good, and it might be - should be. But you said earlier there were no lights on the keyboards or mice. That's a red flag for me and I would want to be certain I'm starting the troubleshooting process with good power.


To rule this in or out, I am going to take a trip to the store where I recently purchased the PSU from. They have testing equipment there and should be able to give me an answer.

a probable failed PSU fried my old motherboard.

It is not rare for a PSU to be taken out by something it supplies power too. It does not have to be the PSU that fails first. The PSU can be collateral damage. And so can every new PSU you stick in there


My original problem is described in this thread: http://www.geekstogo...er-load-screen/

With the old PSU it took several attempts to get the computer to boot up. But when it finally did, it stayed on. However on the last occasion I left the computer running a virus scan and when I returned all power had gone and on testing the PSU it was found to have given up the ghost. I'm guessing this final failiure is what took out the old motherboard. So essentially this was a gradual failing of a very old PSU which is why I think that it was the culprit. However, you may have other ideas?

And no, I didn't do a fresh reinstall

Well, this is tricky with a couple concerns. First, if the Windows license for XP installed on that HD is an OEM license, that means it came with the "original" hardware - specifically the motherboard. The ONLY legal way to legally transfer an OEM license to a new motherboard is if the original motherboard failed AND you are replacing the motherboard with the identical brand and model number, or the maker's recommended model number if the original is out of production. If you decided to "upgrade" the motherboard in the process to a more powerful and current model, that requires a new license. You can replace everything else, just not the motherboard because that is the "mother" board - the "mainboard".

Software makers, not just Microsoft, view an upgraded motherboard as a new computer, and therefore needs a new license.

If you have a full "retail" license of Windows - then no problems. You can transfer as many times as you want. Just don't have it installed on two computers at a time.

I'm just the messenger pointing out the legal facts.


Something I didn't mention is that when I did put in the new motherboard, Windows immediately informed me that the computer had changed significantly and that I would have to re register my copy. It is a full retail version so hopefully I won't have any problems with this apart from the fact that I had to register within three days, which I've not done! (sorry Mr Gates :unsure:)

The other problem with moving that installation of Windows over to a new motherboard is all the drivers for the many devices on the motherboard have changed. Windows is no longer configured to use that hardware. Some is no big deal as Windows can use generic. But some may too specific, causing Windows to choke. So I usually recommend a fresh install when swapping out so many different hardware devices at one time. And besides, with a format, it ensures you are not starting out with tons of orphaned junk on your drive.


I think you've convinced me that a fresh install is the way forward after I've sorted this!

I'm off to get my PSU checked out, so will post back later on and let you know if anything was picked up.

EDIT: Have had PSU checked at the local electronics store and it's been confirmed that the PSU is in perfect working order. So at least we can rule this out.

Thanks :)

Edited by rickmr, 11 May 2011 - 06:32 AM.

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#6
Digerati

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Something I didn't mention is that when I did put in the new motherboard, Windows immediately informed me that the computer had changed significantly and that I would have to re register my copy. It is a full retail version so hopefully I won't have any problems with this apart from the fact that I had to register within three days, which I've not done! (sorry Mr Gates

Good. Being full retail eliminates any legal issues. I was pretty sure you had 30 days, however, but no big deal. You can do it over an over again, if needed.

Keep us posted.
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#7
rickmr

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So as I mentioned in my edit of my last post, the PSU seems to be in working order, so I'd guess that the next option would be to try booting up with one stick of memory in and then the other and see if that works.

If no joy then are we looking at a CPU or Motherboard issue? I want to avoid buying a new CPU if my old one is still in working order. If it is the motherboard, then as it's recently purchased, I should be able to get a replacement.

What course of action would you recommend after the memory test?
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#8
Digerati

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If no joy then are we looking at a CPU or Motherboard issue?

And without any way to test one or the other, it is toss of a coin. Sorry.

Is the system speaker connected (either to a case speaker or to a motherboard mounted button speaker)? Any beebs?
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#9
rickmr

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I don't hear any audible beeps (never did with my old motherboard either) the motherboard is connected up correctly, I'm pretty sure of that.

Looks like I'm going to have to try and get my hands on a CPU to at least test it. If that doesn't work then it looks like a motherboard problem. I'll keep you posted.

Thanks again :)
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#10
rickmr

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Just to let you know on this. The new motherboard I bought was faulty. Not sure what it was but it rendered the usb and ps2 ports inactive. New motherboard is on it's way!
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#11
Digerati

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Keep us posted.
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