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another windows 7 problem OS memory full?


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#1
microace

microace

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I have a ASUS laptop, windows 7 OS, and my computer wants to save anything that needs memory to the OS space. Is there a way I can get around that? I also have saw that instead of having one drive I now have 2 a OS © 8.53/116 GB free, and a DATA (D)265/332 GB free. I also play PC games and they are saving to the OS drive WOW and starcraft 2 I have had to remove and try to transfir items to the DATA (D) memory to help but it is a stressful :unsure: and there is a lot of programs that I will have to move.

If anyone knows how to correct this please let me know or give me some advice thankyou :)
my laptop
Other details of my system are as fallows,,,
Built-in Devices Wireless LAN antenna,
Bluetooth antenna
Width 18.4 in
Depth 12.4 in
Height 1.8 in
Weight 9.3 lbs
Color Brown
Notebook typeGaming laptop ,
Desktop replacement (7+ lbs.)
Wireless capabilities IEEE 802.11b,
IEEE 802.11g,
Bluetooth
Processor
Processor Intel Core i7 i7-720QM / 1.6 GHz
Multi-Core Technology Quad-Core
64-bit Computing Yes
Chipset Type Mobile Intel HM55 Express
RAM
Installed Size 4 GB / 8 GB (max)
Technology DDR3 SDRAM - 1066 MHz
Form Factor SO DIMM 204-pin
Storage
Floppy Drive None
Hard Drive 640 GB - 7200 rpm
Storage Removable None
Hard drive type Portable
Optical Storage (2nd)
2nd optical storage type None
Optical Storage
Type DVD-Writer / BD-ROM
Card Reader
Card reader type 8 in 1 card reader
Supported flash memory cards Memory Stick Duo,
xD-Picture Card,
Memory Stick PRO Duo,
SD Memory Card,
Memory Stick PRO,
Memory Stick,
miniSD,
MultiMediaCard
Display
Display Type 17.3 in TFT active matrix
Max Resolution 1600 x 900
Widescreen Display Yes
Features Zero Bright Dot
Video
Graphics Processor / Vendor ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5470
Video Memory 1 GB DDR3 SDRAM
Audio
Audio Output Sound card
Notebook Camera
Camera Type Integrated
Sensor Resolution 2 Megapixel
Input Device(s)
Input device type Keyboard,
Touchpad
Features Built-in numeric keyboard
Networking
Networking Network adapter
Wireless LAN Supported Yes
Data Link Protocol Bluetooth,
Fast Ethernet,
Ethernet,
Gigabit Ethernet,
IEEE 802.11b,
IEEE 802.11n,
IEEE 802.11g
Compliant Standards IEEE 802.11g,
IEEE 802.11n,
IEEE 802.11b
Expansion / Connectivity
Expansion Slot(s) 2 Memory - SO DIMM 204-pin,
1 (total) / 1 (free) x ExpressCard
Interfaces 1 x Microphone - Input - Mini-phone 3.5 mm,
1 x Audio - SPDIF output/headphones,
1 x Display / video - VGA - 15 pin HD D-Sub (HD-15),
4 x Hi-Speed USB - 4 pin USB Type A,
1 x Network - Ethernet 10Base-T/100Base-TX/1000Base-T - RJ-45,
1 x Display / video - HDMI - 19 pin HDMI Type A,
1 x Storage - eSATA - 7 pin external Serial ATA,
1 x Headphones - Output - Mini-phone 3.5 mm
Power
Power Device External
Battery
Technology 6-cell
Installed Qty 1
Operating System / Software
OS Provided Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Edition
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#2
Digerati

Digerati

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Hi microace and :)

I have a ASUS laptop, windows 7 OS, and my computer wants to save anything that needs memory to the OS space. Is there a way I can get around that? I also have saw that instead of having one drive I now have 2 a OS © 8.53/116 GB free, and a DATA (D)265/332 GB free.

I have had to remove and try to transfir items to the DATA (D) memory to help but it is a stressful and there is a lot of programs that I will have to move.


Understand that this didn't just happen. Partitioning a hard drive is either done at the factory, or someone, typically the computer builder did it during Windows install, or someone, typically the user/owner, used a partitioning program like EASEUS Partition Master Home Edition to split the drive into partitions.

And to me, it is not a problem. In fact, I set up all my own personal computers with two partitions, C, the boot disk I call "System" is for Windows and all my hardware drivers, and D is for all my programs, documents, temp files, and data files.

The trick then is getting disciplined to ALWAYS select the "Custom" installation option for EVERY program you install. If you don't and the program is allowed to use the default installation, it WILL install on C drive. So choose the Custom install option and tell the program to install on D drive. I have folders on my D for Applications, Utilities, Security Stuff, Internet Stuff and a few others. Depending on the program, I install it under one of those descriptive folders.

By choosing the Custom install option and telling the installer to install on D drive, the proper location settings are made to the Registry.

Security Note: EVERYONE should ALWAYS select the Custom installation option for any program you install, even if installing in the default C:\Program Files locations. If you don't, you are likely to install a bunch of junk you don't need or want the developer wants to foist on to your systems - things like toolbars, new home pages, new search engines, download managers, and the like. The Custom option lets you, or should let you, opt out of those - which typically requires you to uncheck the option. If you cannot opt out of those extra features, consider aborting the installing and look for alternative products.

For your existing stuff, I don't recommend "moving" them. That is, don't cut and paste them from C to D. This is because the Registry will still say C drive and all sorts of problems will occur - as noted by your stress comments. And unless you are a Registry expert, I don't recommend you dig around in there to change it manually, nor do I recommend the use of a Registry cleaner for this.

Now having just said don't move it, in some cases, you can move a program's entire folder (if it is all under one folder) to the new drive then run "Repair" or "Change" from the Add and Remove menu. It will likely error out because it won't be able to find the folder where it expects to, but should prompt you to locate it manually where you can then point the it to new location. From there, it (the install routine) discovers an existing installation, then simply updates the Registry for you to the correct locations. It is nice when it works, but note that option is not always there. Sometimes, the only option is Uninstall. So generally, the best bet is to plan to uninstall and reinstall. This will ensure the necessary Registry entries point to the right drive and location. It might be a bit arduous, but once done, it's done. Just make sure you know any registration keys, if any, before starting with each program you paid for.

You can usually change the default save locations for your major applications, like Office, your mail program, your browser(s), etc.

And this works for Windows 7 - http://www.edbott.co...separate-drive/
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