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#31
Macboatmaster

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Check your recycle bins, although these were probably cleaned by TFC


You have 10% file gragmentation and 44% overall of data fragmentation on Drive C.
With the size of that drive, using windows defrag you will be there all night.
Use this.
NOTE the caution do not use any other offered program from Auslogics.
Download Auslogics defrag and run that. DO NOT PLEASE use any other offered program from Auslogics.
http://auslogics.com...defrag/download
Auslogics Defrag in my opinion is better because:
It does a more comprehensive job at Defragging
It will actually show you what it is doing
At the end of working it will show you how much speed you picked up
You can view a online log of the files that Auslogics defraggedPlease do not run any other Auslogics programs other then this one as they may cause unwanted results.

NOTE NEVER NEVER RUN DEFRAG on a drive containing backup images.
It can ruin the image.

Edited by Macboatmaster, 28 June 2011 - 01:39 PM.

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#32
Macboatmaster

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On C drive you have this file
C:\ fla10C.tmp 157.54 MBs
Have you any idea what it is connected with.
Please see if it is still there as this is from Pitstop and since then you have run TFC.

If you have no idea as to what it is, could you please do a search for files and folders, inclsuing hidden containing those details. ie: SEARCH under those parameters for fla10C
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#33
happyrock

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after doing what Macboatmaster advised...run a defragger like Auslogics Disk Defrag 3.2.1.10 from here
be careful when installing it so you don't get any toolbars
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#34
wysiwyg2008

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Ok

I have reduced the system restore capacity, and defragged the c: drive with Auslogic

The fla10c file seems to have been deleted by one of the programs I have used to clean the machine
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#35
Digerati

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Personally, I don't like PC Pitstop because they don't use "industry standard" terminology and that confuses folks. Also, they make recommendations that have no rational basis. For example, the recommendation to reduce System Restore space is, frankly, nonsense!!!! There is no need or advantage to reducing System Restore capacity. For one, if disk space is that critical, it is time to do some MAJOR housecleaning and get rid of space hogging programs and data files you don't need. Or better yet, go buy some more disk space - it's cheap. But more importantly, by design, SR will yield space if free disk space is needed - to the point it will disable itself if disk space is critical. Having a HUGE System Restore reserve IN NO WAY affects performance, therefore, PCPitStops recommendation to reduce it to improve performance is - nonsense. Does it hurt to reduce? No, but it does limit your restore options.

As far as Auslogics Disk Defrag - it is a great program. But the reality is, the defragger that comes with Windows is just fine. Yes, some of the 3rd party defraggers can defrag a bit more efficiently but the reality is, so what? The very next time you use your computer, fragmentation will begin again as Windows and our running programs open files, save temp files, update files, etc. And of course your browser of choice will immediately start dumping 1000s of temp files on your drives. And note defragging was never intended as a means to free up disk space. While some space may be freed on a heavily fragmented drive, it is hardly significant. This is especially true with today's monster and fast drives with NTFS. If you maintain lots of free disk space, you never need to defrag your drives. Defragging was much more important when 500Mb (as in 1/2 Gb) drives were still considered HUGE. Now, 500Gb is almost "small", considering you can get a 3Tb (3,000Gb) drive for less than $200.

That said, if you want to defrag, ALWAYS clean the drive of clutter first. It is counterproductive to defrag with 1000s of tiny temporary Internet files on the drive - and that is the primary reason I am totally against automatic defragging - with 3rd party defraggers, or with the latest version in Windows 7. Also, you should ALWAYS defrag in Safe Mode. This ensures as many movable files as possible are available (not opened by Windows or programs that start with Windows in Normal Mode) for moving/defragging. Again, a reason to NOT use automatic defragging.

Note: Before defragging, IF your system is running fine otherwise, then you can use CCleaner or Disk Cleanup to purge the system of all but the last Restore Point. If the system has problems, I would not be running Defrag as corruption, or further corruption could occur. Defraggers are not repair tools, they are "preventative maintenance" tools. And note that cleaning the drives of clutter in Safe Mode will yield a better cleaning as ".tmp" files, including the fla10c.tmp file, should not be open, and can be deleted too.

On that note, a power outage during a defrag can get ugly. Real ugly. Everybody has their computers on a "good" UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation), right? :)
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#36
Macboatmaster

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Please let me make it absolutely clear right from the start of this post that I am NOT being so stupid or bold as to contradict someone as experienced as Digerati

He is vastly more experienced than I am.

However, for your peace of mind, so that you do not think I have given you BAD advice, May I point out that we had already cleaned up using TFC and ATF, the first dealing with
temp files and other such issues apart from those related to the browser and ATF cleaner taking care of that issue.

Also, I never thought that decreasing system restore capacity would improve performance, as that would only apply if you were short of free space on the hard drive.
However, as you have a capapcity of 500Gb on C drive, the system drive and 57Gb allocated to system restore, the standard 12% set by Windows on XP. (It is 15% on Vista)
and that will allow MANY restore points going back months, I personally can see no point in having so MANY restore points..
HOWEVER, it is important to take in to consideration Digerati`s view on this and the choice must be a matter for yourself..
Some Microsoft MVP`s recommend this:

I recommended 'maximum size' be set to no more than 5% of a system volume that is 100GB or less and 4% of any system volume over 100GB.
Ronnie Vernon
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience



So in summary it very much appears to be a question of - you decide - with the hard drive capacity you have.

Auslogics Defrag, is thought by many to do a better job than the Windows one.
I am UNSURE about that.
What is beyond doubt is that on many occasions the Windows Defrag is like watching grass grow.

With the size of that drive, using windows defrag you will be there all night.

The main reason I suggested Auslogics.

Edited by Macboatmaster, 30 June 2011 - 01:27 PM.

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#37
Macboatmaster

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The last issue to look at is the number of items listed in your startup
Many items are placed there, that it is not necessary to have loading at startup and simply result in Windows taking longer to load.
Please go start, run and type msconfig
When system configuration opens, please clcik the startup tab.
Then please when that is on the screen, click Start, programs , accessories, paint and then when paint opens click the edit tab and click paste. The image of the startup items will appear in paint, then click the file tab and select save as. It defaults to Bitmap on Paint, that is too large to attach. Please select jpeg. Then on your reply post , click full editor and click to attach.
I am only interested in those items checked to load at startup.
You may need to do two screenshots.

These matters are not of course related to the original problem, that appears beyond doubt to have been the overheating issue, plus of course the possible question re the power supply, but I always feel it best to have a general look at other issues raised during the course of the analysis.

It may be a good idea for you to have a look again at those voltages, now you found that the cleaning was desperately required.

Edited by Macboatmaster, 30 June 2011 - 01:36 PM.

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#38
happyrock

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I too recommend shrinking the size of restore to just a few percent...its just not necessary to use so much space plus the fact if just one of the restore points is bad...they are all bad and none of them will work...
I use 2% for restore on my OS drive (320GB) but in addition I also use and recommend ERUNT... (Emergency Recovery Utility NT) here

NOTE...sorry Macboatmaster...I did not see you had already suggested Auslogics prior to my last post... :)
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#39
wysiwyg2008

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Ok here are the screenshots of my startup

startup1.jpeg

startup2.jpeg

I unchecked a few myself a while ago, as if I remember correctly they were causing problems or are simply not needed (I no longer have a HP Printer)
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#40
Digerati

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Please let me make it absolutely clear right from the start of this post that I am NOT being so stupid or bold as to contradict someone as experienced as Digerati

Don't think for a second I cannot or have not been, and no doubt, I will be wrong again. So PLEASE, if I do say something that is inaccurate, then I expect to be contradicted (hopefully with some substantiating links) as the goal is to provide the correct information to our readers.

There are MANY right ways to do things - and typically no one right way for all situations.


My issue about 3rd party defraggers has to do with why they are often used - to free up space. For one, they really don't free up any significant amount space, they primarily group free space together so larger files can be stored with being fragmented. But second, the idea it to declutter and consolidate free space, it makes little sense to me to download and install yet another program that takes up more space.

Finally, I have not seen any bad advice given by Macboatmaster - in fact - his responses have been some of the most professional I've seen. My apologies to Macboatmaster for possibly giving the suggestion of something different.
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#41
happyrock

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My issue about 3rd party defraggers has to do with why they are often used - to free up space


this is true if were talking about SSD's...not so for standard HD...the seek times are around 6 to 15 ms and although that seems pretty quick if you get enough of them they add up...it was 7 or 8 years ago that someone actually ran some tests using cloned drives testing the speed difference between drives that were fragmented and then defragging the drive...
the times were substantial enough to convince me that defragging was well worth the time ...
it also cuts down on head thrashing...really obvious on a RAID 0 setup using 10K raptors
I would really like to give you a link to the article but I am unable to find it...I actually printed it out but I don't have a clue as to where I put it
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#42
Digerati

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I hear what you are saying - but note you said 7 or 8 years ago. That's when a 100Gb drive was a monster drive, and it maybe had 16Mb buffer. Today, you can get 3Tb drives with 64Mb buffers for under $200! Today, if you are running so low on disk space and fragmentation is so bad it is impacting performance, then you do NOT have a properly configured, or maintained computer for your needs! Defragging is only a temporary patch. The correct solution is to buy more space so today's operating systems and HD controllers have the room they need to keep files together so fragmentation never becomes a problem!

Hard drives today must provide two things - storage space and "working" space. You are correct about head thrashing, but the reality is, the head has to move anyway - to either the adjacent sector, or to one no more than a few centimeters away.

I note too 7 or 8 years ago, 2Gb of RAM was a lot. More RAM means less head thrashing.

Also, defragging SSDs is not recommended, or required. Keeping file segments together is preferred only with HDs because the segments must be mechanically located. The sectors on an SSD are located electronically.

Finally, today is much more "cloud" oriented, and not near as much local.
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#43
Macboatmaster

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The first image of your start up items.
1. NvCpl - clock and memory setings on Nividia graphics cards - not needed at startup - UNLESS you have overclocked the card.
2. NWiz - also Nvidia graphics. - not needed at startup
3. RTHDCPL - Realtek sound effect manager - inless you frequently change the sound effects you do not need the manager running at startup
4. ALCMTR - Realtek event monitor - definitely not needed.
5. Nerocheck - simply checks issues with Nero drivers etc. Not needed at startup.
6. PDVDserv - enables use of remote control if you have one on the DVD - for PowerDVD by Cyberlink - unless you have a remote control - not needed.
7. NVMCtray - Nvidia - not needed genrrally but if you run a lot of 3D games keep it.
8. NokiaOvi player. - If you do not use the Nokia player and. or transfer music from computer to phone - not needed at startup
9. jusched - Checks for Java updates - not needed at startup - BOT BE AWARE that out of date Java and Adobe are two LARGE security risks. Always ensure you have the latest.
10. NokiaMserv -Again not needed unless you use the Nokia software frequently
11. bjmyprt - Canon Printer - not needed at startup
12. cnslmain - quick access to canon documentation and utilities -definitely not needed at startup.

You can safely go msconfig and uncheck all of these items.
You may wish to keep a couple of them but all of these have to load with Windows and unchecking most will speed the loading.
After unchecking, Apply and OK and then reboot.
On reboot a message will appear that you have used system configuration utility etc. Simply check the small box - Do not show again.
I will post shortly having looked at the rest of the items.
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#44
Macboatmaster

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The next set.
1. Reader_sl - Speeds up loading Of Adobe reader - not required at startup
NOTE - check for updates. - new reader available.
2. AdobeARM - not needed at startup
3. cfp - LEAVE CHECKED COMODO security
4. QTTask - Apple quick time - not needed at startup.
NOTE always ensure you have the latest,
5. itunesHelper - Leave as it will simply recheck itself as soon as you use iTunes
6. ctfmon - Leave, associated with MS Office and will simply re-establish itself as soon as you open Office
7. Core - facilitates downloading of Electronic Arts games etc. - Leave if you use them.
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#45
happyrock

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I note too 7 or 8 years ago, 2Gb of RAM was a lot. More RAM means less head thrashing.

the heads still have to get that data to move it into ram and move it back
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