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Replace my hard drive


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#1
Nartec

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When moving from Australia to the USA I removed my XP IDE hard drive from my computer and brought it with me. I now want to install my hard drive in another PC as its C Drive so I can gain access to all of my programs, emails etc. I have been told this is not difficult. To me it sounds like open heart surgery! Please help.
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#2
Skeme

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It's as easy as can be. Open it up, locate the hard drive, unplug the SATA cable from the hard drive and replace it with the other.

If you need more of a visual, try some guides on Google or videos on YouTube. :)
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#3
Digerati

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I now want to install my hard drive in another PC as its C Drive so I can gain access to all of my programs, emails etc. I have been told this is not difficult. To me it sounds like open heart surgery! Please help.

Ummmm, no, it is not as easy as can be. Yes, you can easily physically install and connect the drive into a different computer, but you cannot simply install a different Windows installation on a different hard drive into another computer. For one, that is an illegal use of the Windows license, if that Windows came with the other computer as an OEM license.

But for you, because Windows will find a new motherboard (which is really MANY hardware devices, with MANY drivers on one big board) and it will find a new graphics solution and other devices it needs to work properly - all of which it will not be set up for. It is very possible, it will corrupt the drive.

The better solution is to install that drive into an enclosure, or into your new machine as a secondary drive (not the boot or C drive). Then copy off your files. Your email may more difficult, depending on client. Typically, email has to be exported, then imported.
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#4
devper94

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it is actually possible provided you uninstall all manually installed drivers and use something like sysprep to prepare the system first.
oem windows reads data from the computer bios to verify authenticity, so you cannot even start up windows if you change the mainboard.
and no, windows migration will not affect the data inside the drive. without preparation like i said you will only have bsod. it will not corrupt your data.
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#5
Digerati

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A couple things. Only OEM Windows from the big computer makers such as Dell, HP, and Acer verify authenticity via the BIOS. Anybody can buy OEM licenses legally that are not "branded".

Also, while technically possible, it is still not legal - at least not with OEM licenses. Finally, I say again, it can corrupt your data. While maybe rare, especially with later versions of Windows, different drive controllers, drive configurations, RAID or no RAID, etc. especially when Windows is trying to sort out a couple dozen other driver and setup issues at the same time, can result in catastrophic loss of data.

Certainly, performing the system first can minimize risks, but (1) that was not done here and (2) there's still the legal issue, the bypassing of which we at G2G cannot condone, or support.
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#6
devper94

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First I want to recite something from the Windows XP EULA:

4. TRANSFER-Internal. You may move the Product to a different Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you must completely remove the Product from the former Workstation Computer. Transfer to Third Party. The initial user of the Product may make a one-time transfer of the Product to another end user. The transfer has to include all component parts, media, printed materials, this EULA, and if applicable, the Certificate of Authenticity. The transfer may not be an indirect transfer, such as a consignment. Prior to the transfer, the end user receiving the transferred Product must agree to all the EULA terms. No Rental. You may not rent, lease, lend or provide commercial hosting services to third parties with the Product.

(emphasis original)
That means you are entitled to migrate a Windows copy to another machine, even if it is an OEM copy. If Nartec cannot activate Windows on the computer for some reason, he/she can always call Microsoft Support and request a reactivation, even if his/her Windows is a Dell OEM, HP OEM or whatever OEM.

A couple things. Only OEM Windows from the big computer makers such as Dell, HP, and Acer verify authenticity via the BIOS. Anybody can buy OEM licenses legally that are not "branded".

That makes migration even easier, since it is you who owns the rights to use the program, and you are entitled to transfer the copy as long as you follow the Windows EULA.

Also, while technically possible, it is still not legal - at least not with OEM licenses. Finally, I say again, it can corrupt your data. While maybe rare, especially with later versions of Windows, different drive controllers, drive configurations, RAID or no RAID, etc. especially when Windows is trying to sort out a couple dozen other driver and setup issues at the same time, can result in catastrophic loss of data.

Entirely possible. It is one drive so RAID does not apply here. And Sysprep will remove all active drivers on the computer when invoked, leaving little risk of wrecking your computer.

Certainly, performing the system first can minimize risks, but (1) that was not done here and (2) there's still the legal issue, the bypassing of which we at G2G cannot condone, or support.

Nartec has not done anything. He wants support. And we assume the transfer is legal until proven otherwise. We don't know if the Windows copy is legal or not, so it is Nartec's turn to say. He only has to prove that the transfer is legal. Then we have to assist him with his problems.
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#7
Digerati

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Sadly, there is some misinformation presented here.

But first, in no way did I accuse or imply anyone of doing anything illegal, so, devper94, please do not make such implications. My duties here include insuring all our readers are aware of the laws and circumstances so they can make informed decisions, and that is ALL I DID. My apologies to Nartec if you felt there was some innuendo or implied accusation. I assure you, my goal is to keep you informed and from breaking any law unknowingly.

Second, the EULA link provided above is not the correct link. Note it does not specify OEM or Retail license. And it states to read the EULAs included with the products for changes and addendums. Here is where you can find the correct EULA for OEM XP. Note in the OEM XP EULA it says (their ALL CAPS),

Software as a Component of the Computer - Transfer. THIS LICENSE MAY NOT BE SHARED,
TRANSFERRED TO OR USED CONCURRENTLY ON DIFFERENT COMPUTERS. The SOFTWARE is
licensed with the HARDWARE as a single integrated product and may only be used with the HARDWARE. If the
SOFTWARE is not accompanied by new HARDWARE, you may not use the SOFTWARE. You may permanently
transfer all of your rights under this EULA only as part of a permanent sale or transfer of the HARDWARE, provided
you retain no copies, if you transfer all of the SOFTWARE (including all component parts, the media and printed
materials, any upgrades, this EULA and the Certificate of Authenticity), and the recipient agrees to the terms of this
EULA. If the SOFTWARE is an upgrade, any transfer must also include all prior versions of the SOFTWARE.


See Microsoft OEM Licensing FAQs. Note under Transfer of License the following Q and A.

Q. My customer bought a new PC and wants to move the OEM software from the old PC to the new one. Can't users do whatever they want with their software?

A. The OEM software is licensed with the computer system on which it was originally installed and is tied to that original machine. OEM licenses are single-use licenses that cannot be installed on more than one computer system, even if the original machine is no longer in use. The End User Software License Terms, which the end user must accept before using the software, states that the license may not be shared, transferred to, or used concurrently on different computers. System builders must provide end-user support for the Windows license on computers they build, but cannot support licenses on computers they didn’t build. This is a fundamental reason why OEM System Builder licenses can't be transferred.


Under System Builder Licensing section, note the 7th Q and A,

Q. Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?

A. Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.

The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the End User Software License Terms and the support of the software covered by that End User Software License Terms. The End User Software License Terms is a set of usage rights granted to the end user by the PC manufacturer and relates only to rights for that software as installed on that particular PC. The system builder is required to support the software on the original PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade their PCs with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base component "left standing" that would still define the original PC. Since the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC, when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC is essentially created. The original system builder did not manufacture this new PC, and therefore cannot be expected to support it.


In devper94's defense, Microsoft has done poor job of making this clear - leading to such confusion. But as a OEM system builder for nearly 20 years, and with the topic surfacing frequently, I have researched this extensively.

In summary, the transferring of "OEM/System Builders" licenses to a different computer is not legal. If the license is a full "Retail" license, it may be transfered as long as it is removed from all other computers. Note that "Upgrade" licenses are not transferable either, unless the original license the Upgrade is tied to is a full "Retail" license.

Unless Nartec has a question about his license, this line of discussion ends now. This site will not condone the use of software illegally.
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#8
devper94

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I see. Sorry if I caused any misunderstanding.
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#9
Digerati

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No problem. Thanks for your understanding.
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