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wireless a,b,g,n


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#1
mrpakipot

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hi i know that there are 4 wireless networking that can be use today. a,b,g,n where n is the latest and the fastest. does the speed of my wireless network got to do with the speed of my internet??? or the speed only affects my home network speed??? does it make browsing internet faster if i got wireless n??? or internet speed is from isp and wireless networking speed only affects my computer within my home network??? thanks for your help
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#2
hendaz

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Hi mrpakipot,

There are indeed 4 different wireless networking standards. They differ from each other in terms of range and speed.

To answer your question, the speed your ISP offers is in fact your "internet" speed (bandwidth). Your wireless speed is the speed of communications between your wireless device and the router. This speed is normally well above your "internet" speed meaning that it is only affecting your local network. However, if this speed were below your "internet" speed then that would obviously slow down your internet. In today's standards you should really only be using g or n for home networking.

If your having any wireless issues then post back because wireless can be affected by a lot of things but the bottom line is really the wireless speed should only affect local computers (unless you have really high speed internet like 30+ Mb). Try a speed test with a wired connection and then compare it to a wireless speed test to see: http://www.speedtest.net/

Hope this helps..
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#3
mrpakipot

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hi hendaz, im not having any issue and thank you for asking. i only asked becuz i want to learn. thank you for your answer becoz its an additional knowledge for me and you answer it clearly. again thank you very much
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#4
powed

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I have an 802.11g modem, connected to an 802.11b router, with some computers attached wired and others wireless. My ISP connection speed is 5 Mbps. I have a couple of newer computers, but am I correct that the router will not slow down downloads to them because b is 11 Mbps and my ISP is slower than that? I don't transfer much between computers, really just networked to share printer, so don't want to get a new router if it isn't going to benefit me. Only even thinking of it because of video errors on my Sony Bravia.
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#5
hendaz

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Hi powed,

You should have really started a new thread rather than posting a question in someone else's but since its kind of related I'll answer it...

Yes you are correct, the 802.11b has a max speed of 11Mbps. If your ISP speed is only 5Mbps then your router shouldn't be slowing you down as such. However, lots of things affect the wireless speed and so you may not be getting the full 11Mbps (but I would assume your speed will still be above 5Mbps).

However, this assumes that you are only ever using the internet. You have to remember the 11Mbps is the total bandwidth offered by the router if you are exchanging files etc between computers then that will consume bandwidth. For example, if your actual router bandwidth is say 9Mbps and you are exchanging files between computers at a rate of 6Mbps then you only have 3Mbps left for the internet. So in reality there is no definite answer to your question.

My personal advice would be to upgrade from b because it is about 10 years old now and 11Mbps isn't much bandwidth for a home network. Also, what security are you using to protect your wireless network because it may no longer be secure? This is a major issue so let me know..

Hope this helps..
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#6
powed

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Thank you for your response. I'm using 128-bit encrypted WEP key on my NetGear router. I think for now, I'll stick with my 802.11b. It helps to know the limitations so that if they become a problem I can reconsider. I have car-related expenses taking precedence right now.

Thank you again for your clear and useful response.
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#7
hendaz

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I had a feeling you would be using WEP encryption - thats why I asked. Just to let you know WEP is no longer considered secure and so your home network is in affect not secure meaning people will be able to gain access to your network and use your internet if they wish. I would have to recommend you consider an upgrade but if its not an option then just be aware that your network is not secure.

Thanks.
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