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Problem with computer overheating


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#1
Kurosaki

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i recently started using my computer again for few first days it worked well no problems no shut downs i was using it for quite alot time .. then few days ago the power supply burned after few fail-safe shutdowns so i changed with a new one myself since no garanty left (ASUS 450W with a 120 fan) all good i cleaned up the dust added new thermal pasta and opened the computer everything worked until i opened a game (WOW) after few mins the computer shut down. now i use CPUID to monitor the temperature so il post here the screen shot and please tell me the normal temperature for this computer i got all the info in my profiletherm.JPG please help me i really need to fix this since no garanty left i did all possible so dont know what could couse it the computer is 2 years and 1 month old and the room temperature about 25C-29C values the temperature ingame jumps with +10C or even higher i think

Edited by Kurosaki, 11 July 2011 - 03:39 AM.

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#2
SRX660

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According to AMD the CPU can run at 73 degrees C and the ATI card can run at 82 degrees C, so i don't think you have a heat problem. More than likely it is voltage drops that are causing your problems. ASUS is not known for building good power supplys. My preference is to use silverstone, or equivlent PS's. You might look up any Ps's you use on the johnny guru website.

http://www.jonnyguru.com/index.php

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#3
Kurosaki

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i know i have some house electricity problems but i never tough it can be because of it really thank u .. um so should i change the power supply ? thing is i just buyed it 2 days ago and the guys there told me is best option
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#4
Digerati

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ASUS is not known for building good power supplys.

I [conditionally] disagree. While ASUS PSUs are not known for their stellar characteristics, and they are not a brand PSU I would normally recommend, I have not found one bad ASUS power supply review. They produce mid-level supplies, that, while not the most efficient, do deliver clean, stable power in a reliable package. I note that most ASUS PSUs are made by the same folks who make most Cooler Master PSUs, AcBel Polytech. I can find no review of ASUS PSUs on JonnyGuru, but the one AcBel Polytech review received an 8.5 out of 10, which is pretty good. And the Cooler Master reviews are consistently good too. If you have seen a unfavorable review, I would be interested in reading it - then I might change my "conditional" position. If it were not ASUS, certainly a "top-tier" motherboard maker, I would not have doubts. And while it seems everyone from RAM makers to now motherboard makers want to get into the PSU business, I would expect ASUS to value their reputation and choose a good supply and supplier, and would be disappointed in ASUS if they did not.

@Kurosaki - Still, even the best PSU makers can have lemons and I am concerned by your comment that the PSU "burned". Please explain "burned". Sadly, a PSU that literally burns, as in goes up in stinky smoke, indicates a serious excess in current. And in those situations, while rare, a PSU in a such a catastrophic state of failure can destroy everything plugged into it. :unsure:

Also, you say you have bad power in the house. You should seriously consider a "good" UPS with AVR - all computers should be on a "good" UPS with AVR. Also, every household should have a AC Outlet Tester. I recommend one with a GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupt) Indicator as they can be used to test bathroom and kitchen outlets too. These testers can be found for your type and voltage outlet, foreign or domestic, at most home improvement stores, or even the electrical department at Walmart.

I agree your temperatures and voltages look good. If your computer works fine otherwise, and only fails when you try to play WOW or other games, that suggests the PSU is just fine - assuming it has enough power for your system when taxed by gaming. Since your temps are good, then I would look at memory, leaky capacitors,and graphics drivers.

You can test RAM using one of the following programs. Both require you to create and boot to a bootable floppy disk or CD to run the diagnostics. Allow the diagnostics to run for several passes or even overnight. You should have no reported errors.

Windows Memory Diagnostic - see the easy to follow instructions under Quick Start Information,
or
MemTest86+ (for more advanced users) - an excellent how-to guide is available here,
or
Windows 7 users can use the built in Windows Memory Diagnostics Tool.

Alternatively, you could install a single RAM module and try running with that to see if it fails. Repeat process with remaining modules, hopefully identifying the bad stick through a process of elimination.

Thermal "pasta"? Doesn't sound very appetizing! :) Just to be sure, though your temps are good, too much TIM is no good. See my sticky on TIM to make sure you are good to go.
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#5
Kurosaki

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im pretty sure now that is the heating because i tryed to watch a video without having the huge fan ventilating air into my computer because is pretty noisy and after 20 mins of watching the computer shut down and the power supply was pretty hot .. as for the RAM it has no errors.. i dont know what to do at all the screenshot above with the CPUID sensor is when is iddle when i play videos or something the temperature goes with + 10 - 15C more

Edited by Kurosaki, 13 July 2011 - 12:21 PM.

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#6
SRX660

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Back to the power supply, EH! If you power supply is running very hot then the voltage spikes could drop below the volt level needed but the MB and CPU. If that happens then you have a instant shut off. The only true way to see the voltage dips and spikes is to run a power resistor equal to the voltage line and when run thru a meter you can see the voltage drop. Too low voltage will cause most newer motherboards to shut down to keep from frying the circuits on the board.

http://www.ehow.com/...wer-supply.html

It might be easier to just buy a good power supply

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#7
Kurosaki

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problem fixed :) it was indeed an voltage problem .. but not the supply was the fault .. the outlet was having electricity in while it was shut down and electricity was going even trough the null wire that is used for grounding now i found a temporary way to fix it but i am gonna need to fix the wires from whole house pretty soon >.> it will take a lot of time.. thank you very much for all support now the computer temperature vent back to normal as well!

Edited by Kurosaki, 13 July 2011 - 05:44 PM.

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#8
Digerati

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Glad you got it sorted out. How did you determine your facility power/mains was bad?

@SRX660 - Sorry, and with all due respect, that PSU test tutorial is not good. In fact, it is lousy! It is riddled with errors. It fails to tell how to signal the PSU to turn on. It fails to tell how to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to the motherboard. It fails to tell where or how to connect the dummy load. It incompletely tells how to test current, or what the user should expect. And it requires the user to have two(?) multimeters. :)

Plus, while it correctly reports PSU voltages must be "clean", it fails to mention most multimeters are incapable of testing for, or measuring excessive ripple and other anomalies that can disrupt high-speed digital electronics.

The better solution for the typical computer user, that is, for someone who is not a "moderately experienced electronics hobbyist or technician", is to swap in a known good PSU. Short of that, take it to a professional, or use a device designed specifically for the purpose, a PSU tester, such as the FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester. First and foremost, these are safe! They don't involve two sharp, hard highly conductive probes jammed deep into the heart of the computer. There's no guess work. They already include a small dummy load and are wired to enable the PSU to turn on without the user knowing how to, or which pins to short. Plus they can be used to test fans and drive motors, as well as all PSU connections, all without the user needing to know which voltage should appear on which pin.

Some lessor testers have only a single LED to indicate voltage is present. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within specified ATX Form Factor Standard tolerances, as noted here:

Posted Image
NOTE: Disregard the -5VDC reading. It is no longer used.


Note to conclusively test a PSU, you must swap in a known good one, or test the PSU under various realistic loads. Conclusive testing can only be done with an oscilloscope or power meter by someone trained to use them, and who understands the results. This means even that Frozen PSU Tester may indicate the PSU is good, but fail to indicate the voltages are "dirty".
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#9
Kurosaki

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Glad you got it sorted out. How did you determine your facility power/mains was bad?

i had an electrical screwdriver {it shows a light when there's power :) )don't know if that's the real name of it but well however i was keep trying to find out what the problem is and i finally tough i should check the outlets as well and thats how i found out however the problem is not completely fixed i know where it comes from now but i need time to change the wires with new ones
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