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help me pick a motherboard and processor for new build


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#1
mad_skillz

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hello everyone,


i decided to go ahead and build a system instead of buying one.so my question is.
what is a great mother board to start my new build with.
i will be surfing the net,watching tv,movies and videos online.also would like to play some games mostly war/army games and some racing ones as well.i also do a lot of multi-tasking

what would be a good processor for my needs?
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#2
mad_skillz

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i know the power supply is very important.but is there such thing as to much power?is there a way to tell how many watts a mobo could handle?
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#3
Digerati

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There are 1000s of motherboards so for us to pick one is impractical. Besides, there are two cardinal rules when building a PC you MUST adhere too. You must (1) establish a budget and (2) define the primary role of the computer.

A computer will draw from a power supply only what it needs. So if the computer needs 300 watts, it will draw from the PSU 300W, regardless if the PSU is a 550W PSU or a 1000W PSU. So is there such a thing as too much power? Yes - when it breaks the budget needlessly.

Note the PSU is probably one the most important purchases so budgeting for a quality supply from a reputable maker is a must. BUT, you cannot properly size a PSU until you have selected all the other devices and have determined their power requirements.
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#4
mad_skillz

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i have chosen a CPU. I am going with the intel i5 2500k.and for a mother board(ASUS P8Z68-V LE LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS).seems like it has all the connections i need.
now for a case.should i use a mid or full size case.


thanks for the help
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#5
Digerati

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Full size cases are HUGE and HEAVY and most folks just don't need that much space unless they will be using many (5, 6, or more) hard drives. I'd stick with a mid size. I would look for one with several large (120mm or larger) fan support. I prefer at least one in front drawing cool air in and at least one in back (not counting the PSU fans) exhausting hot air out. I will not buy a case without a washable, removable air filter. Fancy lights do nothing for performance, draw some power, generate some heat, and do nothing for performance - worth repeating.

I like Antec cases. Beware of aluminum cases. The good ones are expensive, the cheap ones are cheap and wobbly, which can cause the case to twist and become "untrue" (corners and bends not exactly 90°. And torquing of the case puts excessive strain on the motherboard mounting points.
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#6
mad_skillz

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i was looking at this case.
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16811129097

and this motherboard.
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16813131773

would this be a good choice for the intel 2500k?i would like to over clock it to around 4.5ghz.
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#7
Digerati

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Antec makes great cases. And while that one has fancy lights which I don't like (I want a case to sit quietly and discreetly out of the way so I can stay focused on my monitors), it has excellent build quality, lots of great fan options, washable air filters, USB ports up high so you don't have to get on hands and knees to see, variable speed fans, removable drive cages and more. With that case, I could live with the blue lights - and at least the top one can be turned off.

I am not into overclocking but apparently that CPU does well. Just understand, and to ensure you are aware of the consequences, in spite of what marketing weenies claim, overclocking voids the CPU warranty, as does using a 3rd party cooler. If you are okay with that, no problem.

ASUS is a great motherboard maker. Check the motherboard's webpage and you will see QVLs (qualified vendors list) for both CPUs and RAM that are compatible with that specific board. You must use a CPU from the list. For RAM, there are too many makers making too many RAM models for motherboard makers to test and list them all. So you can buy a brand not listed, you just need to make sure you buy RAM with specs that match RAM on the list.

Note too you can download the manuals for your components now and get familiar with the components before they arrive. Pay special attention to mounting the motherboard, and proper standoff positioning.
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