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Spontaneous Connection Spikes


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#1
xJollyLlama

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Hello, Geekstogo. As this is my first post here, I'll try to be as descriptive and easy to help as possible. Hopefully somebody can figure out my issue, as I am completely stumped.

Around 8-months ago, I started experiencing random jumps in my ping while playing games on my PC and Xbox 360, and in many different VoIP programs. At first, I suspected it may be my modem, as the lights on the modem were shutting off and turning back on as the spikes occurred. I called up my ISP (Time Warner), and they sent someone out. Sadly, they couldn't find the issue because it occurred at completely random times. They did, however, replace the modem and went on their way. The problem continued day-in and day-out until about a week ago when I finally came to the idea that it could very-well be our router. I tried directly connecting my PC to the modem for around 12-hours with no connection issues. So, a friend has lent me a router to determine if that was the issue. Sure enough, the ping jumps seemed to go away.

Now, I am staying with my grandmother for a couple of weeks while my house is being worked on, and the issue is happening here, as well. I am using the same computer, and the same router (the one my friend lent me). But the modem, ISP, and ethernet cables are all different. With this happening here, I thought it could be my network card. The only issue with that theory is that the connection issue was happening on other computers at home, as well as my Xbox 360.

If any of that was confusing, I'll quickly go over the issue in a few notes:
- Ping to many different servers randomly jump up and down.
- The issue continues to occur between different ISP's and Modems.
- Ping spikes on Xbox LIVE as well as PC games and VoIP services.

I'm not a professional, which is why I'm here. But from what I think I can tell, it's not the router, it's not the ISP, it's not the modem, it's not my PC, and it's not the wires. So, what could the problem be?

If I've left out any information you need to figure out the issue, please let me know so I can do as much as possible to help figure this out. Thank you in advance!
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#2
admin

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Welcome to Geeks to Go. :)

Out of curiosity what are you using to measure pings? Also, are you familiar with tracert? It's run from the command line in Windows, and might help identify the source of the latency (start -> run -> tracert google.com).
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#3
xJollyLlama

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I'm using the in-game latency numbers in various games, as well as the built-in latency number on Ventrilo. I've also used speedtest.net and pingtest.net during times of spike. But generally, it only catches the tail-end of it because the jump in ping is completely random, out-of-the-blue, and short-lived.

Running 'tracert google.com' brought up an average of 7ms which I don't think is an issue. I may have to try running it while having a jump in latency, but I'll probably just catch the tail-end of it with that as well. :)
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#4
admin

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If you can capture it in a tracert you'll be able to identify which hop is causing the problem, and also whether it's your problem or the ISPs. The ISP is going to have something to work with if you give them the tracert info.

WinMTR is an alternative to tracert that updates automatically and is more powerful. Let it run and see what you find.
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#5
xJollyLlama

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Alright, so I finally got a chance to use WinMTR as my ping jumps are staying for a while. These are the results as it's running:

Posted Image

Sadly, by the time I could copy this, the jumps seemed to have stopped. When I first started it, "cpe-76-174-192-1.socal.res.rr.com" had a 50% Loss Rate. So, what does that mean the problem is? =oX


(Also, here's what Pingtest.net returned during the massive ping spikes:
Posted Image)

Edited by xJollyLlama, 26 August 2011 - 10:54 PM.

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#6
Troy

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That is a bad result with the Pingtest. Have you contacted your ISP technical support?
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#7
admin

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Send the results to your ISP. The problem is on their end. cpe-76-174-192-1.socal.res.rr.com is your ISP (Road Runner?). You can also see the worst ping for that hop was 2478.
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#8
xJollyLlama

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Alright, thank you so much for the help. I'll be calling Time Warner right away. Thank you again! :)
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