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How much pressure can a MoBo hold?


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#1
Parameter

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It's 1:40 AM an I just quit trying to build the PC today. :)

I've experienced an issue I would've never thought I'll ever experience. I thought there are some standards that all ATX components must follow, but it seems either ASUS or Thermaltake don't really care about them ... or I'm doing something wrong.

The thing is, after spending almost an hour figuring out the purpose of the small metal pieces standing out of the I/O shield (turns out there is none so I broke them off), I can only fit the MoBo's ports through the I/O shield if I lift it a bit. Now, this wouldn't usually be a problem if it wasn't for the fact that now I can't reach the screw hole in the case through the MoBo with an 6-32 screw :)

Now, I can fit the three screws on the right side (as in - the opposite of the back of the PC), but the amount of pressure I wouldd have to use to literally (!) bend the MoBo down to use the screw holes right next to the I/O ports doesn't feel right to me (and most likely someone who wrote "do not overtighten the screws, it can damage the board" in the manual) so that's the point where I decided to come here instead.

Question - What the...? In my previous PC, I didn't have the problem as:
1. I've had these... bolts (?) at the bottom of the MoBo (or the trey...?) which held it a bit above the tray anyway.
2. I didn't had to use an I/O shield as there were no additional ports than they were holes in the original "shield" in the case.

What can I do now? I'd really like to avoid not using the I/O shield. The two things that come to my mind are:
1. To just use longer screws (how brilliant :yes: ).
2. To ditch the 6-32 screws and use M3 screws which happen to perfectly fit to the M-F stand offs, which also came with the case.

Call me stupid, but aren't the stand-offs SUPPOSED to be used? If you read this and do a facepalm thinking "how come he not think of using stand offs" - feel free to share your thought, it would already be helpful.

:unsure:
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#2
Amst3rDamag3

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Pics would be very helpful,
giving the specs of the case and board wouldn;t hurt either :unsure:

And might I suggest you look at it again when you're rested and awake?


Good luck :)


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#3
Parameter

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Pics would be very helpful,
giving the specs of the case and board wouldn;t hurt either :)

And might I suggest you look at it again when you're rested and awake?


Good luck :)

:yes: So it's not the standoffs after all? I though I'll find 10 people here saying "of course you have to use stand-offs" ;)

Anyway (before I start making pics), the case is a Thermaltake Element S (with NO removable tray) and the MoBo is an ASUS P7H55.

Basically, when I lay it down on the (non-removable) trey (without any stand offs), the I/O ports are lower than the I/O shield and it (the MoBo) has to be lifted in order for the ports to fit through the shield, but then I can't screw it to the tray otherwise I would break off all ports since the MobO is lifted (~1 cm).

------------EDIT-----------

After some quick Googling I confirmed my theory - should've used the stand offs. Here's the first site I've found:
http://biorobots.cwr...comp/mountmobo/

Although in my case, the stand offs look like that:

Posted Image

Basically, that will most likely solve the issue, I'll let you know if that's the case.

BTW, is it THAT obvious that neither the case, nor the MB manufacturer decided not to mention it in any manual even though the case manufacturer went so far to use pictures and instructions on how to install an expansion card? :unsure:

Edited by Parameter, 02 September 2011 - 03:49 AM.

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#4
phillpower2

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FWIW Parameter case manufacturers provide stand offs and not MB manufacturers or suppliers.
This is because the case manufacturers know whether or not stand offs will be required, a bonus for the MB manufactures/suppliers as it keeps their costs down.
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#5
Neil Jones

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The lengths and types of the standoffs vary depending on the case. In some cases if they have raised "mounts" there is no need for a stand-off on a raised mount.

The boards themselves are relatively flexible, but if you have to really force something to make it fit, you're doing something wrong. Nothing in a PC case needs to be forced.
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