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Overclock New Build: Ram Question


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#1
4Orbs

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Hello. I've chosen the pieces for my new build and have a question about the right ram for my first try at overclocking. The pieces are:

MB - Gigabyte GA990XA-UD3
CPU - AMD FX-6100 Zambezi Six Core
RAM - G.Skill Ripjaws X 1600mhz 8GB DDR3
PSU - Corsair CX600 Builders Series
HDD - WD Caviar Black Sata6 500GB

The above listed RAM is what I consider safe for not-overclocking. The MB specs also list 1866 ram as not-overclock, and 2000 ram as overclock. Can I safely choose and use the 2000 ram instead of the 1600 without worry? I don't want to try overclocking until I become comfortable with the system at stock speeds.

I already have the other necessary pieces for the system; Cooler Master Elite 310 Mid-ATX case, Lite-On DVD Burner, Sapphire ati HD5770 Graphics card, Dual 20 inch monitors. I plan on installing a Linux operating system, probably Kubuntu.

Thanks in advance for your advice.

Edited by 4Orbs, 19 October 2011 - 02:17 AM.

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#2
Digerati

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I am not a fan of overclocking so I can't really answer that. I would suggest you plug the RAM under consideration, and the word "review" into your favorite search engine and read what the review sites are saying.

I don't want to try overclocking until I become comfortable with the system at stock speeds.

You need to become an expert at system cooling and monitoring your systems PC health before you take on overclocking too. And understand that overclocking violates the terms of both AMD and Intel CPU warranties - this in spite of what their marketing weenies would have us think. Note too that motherboard makers, and their marketed overclocking abilities, do not, and will not cover damages to the CPU should their overclocked boards take out your CPU (or RAM).
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#3
4Orbs

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Thanks, digerati, for the reply. Is there any downside to installing the higher rated ram for daily use without overclocking? I am aware of the consequences of failed attempts to OC, but would like to have the pieces already in place when I finally decide to give it a try. I do plan to get a better cooling setup before jumping into the fire. While I'm nowhere close to being an expert, I do know how to monitor system health and temps. I'm more interested in the learning experience. I don't really do anything that requires overclocking. Maybe I should just install the 1600mhz ram and be happy/safe.

Also, the pieces haven't even been ordered yet. Any suggestions for a better or more-affordable but closely equivalent setup would be appreciated.

Edited by 4Orbs, 19 October 2011 - 11:18 AM.

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#4
Digerati

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I don't know of any downside to installing faster RAM. As long as it is compatible, faster RAM will simply toggle down in speed to match the bus speeds. If anything the faster RAM will be loafing along, instead of being stressed. Faster RAM may cost a little more (depending on availability and demand), but as you note, has the potential to carry you further through future upgrades.
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