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Factory image drive in the red


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#1
teedoff_99

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My factory image drive is in the red. I get the message your factory image (D) is low. I have factory disk for my computer so is it possible to clear the factory image drive? If so, what are the steps to do this? Will the damage my hard drive? Or is there a way I can free up space so this message stops appearing?
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#2
SRX660

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1) You can go to start, computer , right click on the full drive D: or E: or whatever it's called and click Explore and see if there's a backup yellow folder called pc or your pc's usernames. If you do see it delete that yellow folder, if not leave everything else there.
NOTE: Don't delete any other files or recovery purple folders. You also don't have access to view them they're meant for recovery purposes only.

You can also get rid of the annoying popup message box by going into your registry as shown in the link below and create the entry so that the pc won't check for low disk spaces and warn you every 5 minutes about it.

http://pcsupport.abo.../dislowdisk.htm

SRX660
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#3
teedoff_99

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I followed the steps and there was only the purple recovery folder nothing else. How does a full factory image drive effect the computer? Is it something I should be concern with?
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#4
Macboatmaster

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I am responding as SRX660 is offline.
However he will come back to you, when he comes online and receives the notification of your last post on this thread.

I have only come in on the thread to explain to you how the site works.

That said, your factory image is as SRX660 has said, the recovery partition created when the computer was assembled and sold.
These are normally found on OEM systems, such as Dell, HP etc.
However they may also be found on some non-branded computers and are then created by the person who built the system.

They allow the system to be returned to the condition it was when the computer was sold, meaning that all your data and anything installed since then will be lost.
HOWEVER some recovery partitions and again usually on branded computers will allow what is known as a soft recovery where if it works as it supposed to, your data will be preserved.
Effectively that is a reinstall of the Windows operating system ONLY, rather than a format and reinstall of the "C" drive.

You should certainly NOT delete it whatever other backup you have.

Finally nothing should ever be written to the parition even if it will allow you to.
WHY is should suddenly, if that is the case, be flagged by the Operating system as full or seriously lacking space is another matter. IF THIS has not occurred before.

It needs further investigation and SRX660 will return to you.

SRX660
Hope you do not mind the post, made just to reassure teed_off99

Edited by Macboatmaster, 23 October 2011 - 08:09 PM.

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#5
Macboatmaster

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teedoff_99

As per my post on your other thread here
http://www.geekstogo...__fromsearch__1

Thank you for your co-operation in the future.
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