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I've done something really stupid


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#1
Jonesey

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I've just finished building a new i7 Win 7 system with the intention of going 64 bit end to end.

I've just discovered that I've installed the 32 bit version - is there a quick way to sorth this out?

I have a feeling the answer is no and that I'm going to have to go back to square one and install again from the 64 bit disc.

I was told that there should be a separate product key for the 2 versions, but mine is actually on 2 separate DVD's


Many thanks,

Jonesey
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#2
Essexboy

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You are correct - to install the 64 bit version you need to install on a clean drive. But, windows will wipe it for you. And if you had two dvd's then the key is good for both :)
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#3
Jonesey

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Thanks Essex boy.

You confirm my fears.

What a dork :)
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#4
Essexboy

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It won't take long - but it will wipe the drive so back anything up first - have fun
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#5
Digerati

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It is better to start over anyway. Be sure to have your 64-bit drivers handy. And yes, same key. And in case you might be wondering, though you have two disks, the license only allows for one installation on one computer at a time.
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#6
Jonesey

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Ok. Now I've completely fried it.

Sequence of events:

1 -Install the 64 bit version from the DVD
2 - Get as far as a brand new desktop, no other stuff loaded yet
3 - Decide to install some of the MOBO utilitites
4 - DVD doesn't boot from within Windows, so I decided to reboot from the DVD
5 - At what I thought was the usual prompt to confirm "Boot from DVD within 30 seconds", I hit the enter key. As I watched I realsied I'd hit another entry which I can barely recall the name of - something like "enable uexec recovery"

Since then, all I've had is a blank screen. I'ce tried rebooting from the Gigabyte disc, without the disc, but I can't even get as far as the BIOS.

So, question is, is it fried/dead?

I can't believe this has happened. To say I'm a bit more than slightly annoyed is a massive understatement. ANY advice would be gratefully received.


Jonesey
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#7
Digerati

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I would check your motherboard manual for resetting the BIOS. Then see if you can go into the BIOS Setup Menu, reset date and time, and set the CD/DVD as first in the boot order, then reinstall Windows from scratch.
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#8
Jonesey

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Resetting the BIOS seems to have worked.

Though this wasn't straight forward, as I seem to have "misplaced" my manual!

In fact, all of my manuals for this build are all in one place, but I can't find any of them. I spent over an hour searching thr house from top to bottom but their whereabouts is currently a mystery.

So I removed the Mobo battery, waited about 10 minutes, put in back in, then shorted the "CMOS reset" pins and I booted up ok.

I had to reset the date / time (as expected) but at the moment, all seems to be going ok.

Thanks for your help - I might be back :)
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#9
Digerati

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Note that almost every computer and computer parts maker maintains copies of their manuals on line for downloading. These are often updated/corrected copies from those that came with your hardware. So I recommend you keep a folder with links to all your hardware manuals in a handy location.

In the future, to reset the BIOS, you never have to pull the battery AND short the pins. Both actions do the same thing so one or the other will do. Also note that CMOS devices are specifically used because they are easy to reset. If motherboard designers wanted it to be difficult (say, to prevent an accidental reset) they would have used a different device, like an EEPROM.

CMOS devices (which are memory devices) have the unique characteristic that they almost instantly dump any stored data when the "holding voltage" is removed from its pins. Shorting the two reset pins instantly shorts any holding voltage and any "residual voltages" in the circuit to ground so the CMOS device is almost instantly reset (within a second or two - 10 seconds is more than enough).

There are many types of capacitors used for many purposes in electronics. Capacitors store power too and "storage" capacitors are often used in many circuits to maintain power during short interruptions. While there are capacitors in the CMOS circuit, there are no "storage" capacitors in CMOS circuits (remember, engineers want it to be easy to reset the BIOS). Instead, they use a battery to maintain that power. So when you remove the battery, again that "holding voltage" is instantly removed. But since you are not shorting out the circuit, there may be some "residual voltage" for a short time until it fully "decays" enough to cause the CMOS to dump its data. This typically takes about 30 - 45 seconds. So removing the CMOS battery for 1 - 2 minutes is more than enough.
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#10
Jonesey

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Good information my friend.

Thanks a lot for your input.

Just a quick update, I've reinstalled all of my programes, including all music, video & photo libraries, set up new user accounts and, touch wood, all seems well.

I've set up a new Home network and can share libraries across the network as well as the printers, so I think I'm about there.

Time to do a backup.
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