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choosing correct processor for application


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#1
pgrbff

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I will shortly be starting a 2nd year University course in web applications and development. I need a new PC as my 7 year old Athlon 64 3500 is struggling. I will be running Adobe CS5, a text editor and have several web pages open at the same time, often with 2 windows open side by side.
What type of processor should I be looking for? What other components would be critical?
Thanks
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#2
Digerati

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Most, if not all of the better software makers provide a "Systems Requirements" page that list the "minimum" needed for satisfactory performance. See here for CS5.5.

If you want two windows open side by side, then obviously a large monitor is desired. A 24" widescreen may due, but IMO, there is nothing better than running multiple monitors. I use two 22" widescreens and am very happy with them. Most graphics cards support two monitors. And Windows has multi-monitor support built in.

I highly recommend 64-bit Windows 7 and 6Gb of RAM for triple channel motherboards, and 8Gb of RAM for dual-channel motherboard.

You need to establish a budget, then go from there.
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#3
pgrbff

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I have two monitors and Windows 7.
I'd prefer to work the other way, establish what I need and how much it costs, then decide if I want/can afford to spend more.
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#4
Digerati

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I'd prefer to work the other way, establish what I need and how much it costs, then decide if I want/can afford to spend more.

You can always spend more. You can spend $4000 on one graphics card, if you want. So you still need to decide how much you want to spend, and as long as you meet at least the minimums, you can go from there.

But for us to help you, we need to know how much you are willing to spend. If money is no object, then pretty much the more you spend the better the performance.
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#5
pgrbff

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The question is more or less specific to processor.
As I understand it there are procesors more appropriate to say gaming, a single application with high graphics demand, which would not be so good for running multiple applications.
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#6
Digerati

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CPUs are not designed for specific tasks although Intels are often considered better for design while AMDs for gaming. But in reality, there are too many other factors, such as the amount of RAM and especially the graphics solution.

Note a good gaming graphics card does NOT make a good CAD/CAE card. And a good "workstation" graphics card used for CAD/CAE does not make a good gaming card.
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