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Computer Shuts Down


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#1
Johnmelo

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First my computer would just shut off when I loaded up some video games. So I changed out my PSU with a different one and now sometimes it won't even turn on. And my screen just stays black.

So then I decided to unplug my graphics cards at different times so only one was plugged in. Still no luck.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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#2
Johnmelo

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Can you please delete your post, ItsFixed and start your own thread?


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#3
Digerati

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Hi John and :welcome:

I have split out that other post.

Sudden shutdowns, freezes, and reboots can be caused by many things which makes troubleshooting difficult. Swapping PSUs is typically my first suggestion as I always want to make sure I am supplying good power.

Can I assume, since you were inside the computer, you made sure it was not (or is not now) blanketed with a layer of heat trapping dust?

What are your temps?

Inspect the motherboard for bulging or leaking electrolytic capacitors. These failed or failing capacitors are a common cause of sudden, but seemingly random system lock ups and reboots. The capacitors look like tall soda cans, many of which surround the CPU socket.

All older motherboards, and many of today's less expensive motherboards use electrolytic capacitors containing a liquid electrolyte. Failing (including flawed and/or abused/over-heated) capacitors literally bulge at the seams due to excessive internal pressures. Extreme (and very rare) cases result in a firecracker type explosion or “pop” or “snap” type sound that can really stink up a room. Typically, electrolyte just oozes from the pressure relief point, which appears as a symbol or letter stamped in the top of the capacitor casing. The electrolyte can be caustic to motherboards and flesh. Look for white to dark-brown, dried liquid or foam on the tops or bottoms of the capacitors. Bulging capacitors are a sign leakage is about to occur.

A motherboard with bulging or leaky capacitors can be repaired, but often it is more cost effective in the long run to replace the motherboard.

Be sure to first power down, unplug the computer, and keep yourself discharged by touching the bare metal of the case before reaching in.

You might try using one stick of RAM at a time and see what happens.
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#4
Johnmelo

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The things I've tried so far:

I tested the ram one stick at a time and my screen still wouldn't turn on.

I then tried only one video card at a time. While also trying my old video card and still netted the same result.

New PSU and still the same problem.

Also tried different monitors and still same thing.


So every once in awhile my screen will come on and I can get on my computer(but shuts down when I load up video games). And sometimes my computer turns on and my screen will just stay black.

So I am guessing I have a motherboard problem? If so, how do I check for that? I checked for faulty leaks and I couldn't find any.


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#5
Digerati

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Unfortunately, you cannot really test the motherboard and sadly, it could still be the CPU and not the board itself. And unless you have a spare CPU to test, and perhaps sacrifice, you may need to take it to a shop.
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