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Wireless LAN range. G, N etc HOW DOES IT WORK?


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#1
daffy_elmo

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Excuse what is probably a stupid question,

We have only wireless G adapters in all the comps in our house.
Our house is quite big so at then outskirts the signal is weak (when using wireless G router).

I then upgraded from a wireless G router to a wireless G + eXtended range (TP-Link).
This made the connection slightly better.

Just recently I upgraded to a wireless N router.

This has made the connection way way better. (now I am getting 70% connection strength as opposed to 30%).

BUT: How is this possible??? If all my devices are wireless G, then isn't it just as hard for my wireless N router to 'hear' my devices?
And isn't a connection only as strong as it's weakest link?

Shouldn't I still have the same overall unreliable connection with the N router as with the G considering that the reliability of the connection relies on both my devices being able to 'hear' the router AND the router being able to 'hear' - the much weaker - clients?

Slightly confused.
Maybe someone can illuminate the situation.
Thanks :D
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#2
Neil Jones

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A wireless N router has a better range. It's also backwards compatible with wireless G devices.
Your original problem was caused because your router didn't have enough strength wireless wise to transmit a signal as far away as you needed it to.
Therefore because the transmitting range is better, the older devices can talk to it.
The key point is the wireless transmitter is the weakest link in the chain because if it isn't powerful enough, nothing else can talk to it.
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#3
daffy_elmo

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Thanks,
This totally makes sense. :)
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