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Laptop no longer boots.


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#76
Sode no Shirayuki

Sode no Shirayuki

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When I select number 3, this screen appears.

http://www.bild.me/b...645untitled.JPG

This means I'll have to boot from the operating system disc and reinstall Windows, right?

Edit: Should I put the bad hard drive back in and try resetting it, too?

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 25 December 2011 - 10:19 PM.

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#77
Sode no Shirayuki

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I tried resetting the disk to a non-raid disk but nothing happened. I think I need to delete the existing raid volume (option number 2).
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#78
rshaffer61

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Let me ask is there anything on the hard drive you need to save at this point?
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#79
Sode no Shirayuki

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Okay. I managed to reset the hard drive to a non-raid disk. I overlooked a step - That's why it didn't work initially.

This is interesting, though. The hard drive I reset was the bad hard drive. I just successfully booted into Windows using the bad hard drive and it has all of my previous files/folders and configurations from years ago.
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#80
Sode no Shirayuki

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For some reason, the computer had stopped recognizing the hard disk. It reported that the hard disk had failed and that the raid volume was degraded.

I reset the bad hard disk to a non-raid disk and now I've booted into Windows. The hard disk works now. It has all of my previous files/programs/configurations from years ago. I was just playing some of the music on itunes.

In light of this, what should I do next?
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#81
Sode no Shirayuki

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Something just caught my attention. The colored lines are reversed on the "bad" hard drive.

On the good hard drive, the colored lines appear on the desktop and not on any files/folders/programs.

On the "bad" hard drive, the colored lines appear on files/folders and not on the desktop.

Edit: And no, there's nothing on the hard drive that I need.

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 27 December 2011 - 05:55 PM.

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#82
Sode no Shirayuki

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I'm considering just nuking both hard drives and starting fresh. I'm not sure what to do, though.

If the purpose of RAID is to replicate data across multiple drives, then it's useless, isn't it? I have an external drive now which I can use to keep system images on.

What should I do now?

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 27 December 2011 - 06:14 PM.

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#83
Sode no Shirayuki

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So... I reset the other drive to a non-raid disk. Both drives are non-raid disks now.

I pressed F2 during the boot process and entered setup. I select 'drives' then disabled 'SATA-2' since it doesn't exist. I'm no longer getting error messages during the boot process.

I see two possibilities now.

1) I can leave both drives as non-raid disks and install Windows on one and Ubuntu (which I'll probably never use) on the other.

Or

2) I can use a RAID level 0 configuration (I'm pretty sure I had level 1 last time)

"A RAID level 0 configuration uses a storage technique known as data striping to provide a high data
access rate. Data striping is a method of writing consecutive segments, or stripes, of data sequentially
across the physical drives to create a large virtual drive. Data striping allows one of the drives to read data
while the other drive is searching for and reading the next block."

"Another advantage of a RAID level 0 configuration is that it utilizes the full storage capacities of the
drives. For example, two 120-GB drives combine to provide 240 GB of hard drive space on which to store
data."

Though, I'd like to nuke both hard drives but I don't remember how. Anyway, I don't know much about this stuff so I'd like your opinion.
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#84
Sode no Shirayuki

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Okay... I can access both hard drives now via My Computer but now my CD/DVD drive won't open. It's not even being recognized in Device Manager.

Edit: Fixed my CD/DVD drive. It turns out I forgot to connect it to the power supply inside of the computer. I re-enabled 'SATA-2' in setup because that was for the CD/DVD drive. It was nonexistent before because the CD/DVD drive wasn't being recognized.

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 27 December 2011 - 07:54 PM.

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#85
rshaffer61

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Broni's canned speech:

One of these may help:
1. Uninstall the drive through Device Manager.
Restart computer. The drive will be automatically reinstalled.
or...
2. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314060
Restart computer.
or...
3. Download, and run Restore Missing CD Drive patch
Double click on cdgone.zip to unzip it.
Right click on cdgone.reg, click Merge.
Accept registry merge.
Restart computer.
or...
4. Go to Device Manager, click a "+" sign next to IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers.
You'll see two items:
- ATA Channel0 (or Primary Channel)
- ATA Channel1 (or Secondary Channel)
Right click on each of them, and click Uninstall. Confirm.
Restart Windows. They'll be automatically reinstalled.
5. Go to Microsoft's site http://support.micro..._drive_problems and follow the steps.
6. Try the guide at this link http://support.microsoft.com/kb/982116

Thank's to Broni for the instructions
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#86
Sode no Shirayuki

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Thanks. I managed to fix it, though. It was a simple case of forgetting to connect the CD/DVD drive to the power supply in the computer.

Anyway, here's what I've done so far.

1) Reset both drives to non-raid disks.

2) I copied my music from the hard drive that formally didn't work to a USB stick

3) I deleted the raid volume

4) I created a new raid volume - I used raid level 0 config. for better performance. I think the raid level 1 config. is worthless if I make system image backups to an external drive.

5) I deleted all partitions on both hard drives.

6) The operating system disc is now formatting and installing Windows XP.

Now, I'll wait and see what the end result is. I've never used the raid level 0 config. before so I'm not sure what's going to happen.

Edit: I'll see if this fixes the colored lines on the monitor.

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 27 December 2011 - 08:25 PM.

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#87
Sode no Shirayuki

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Alright, I've deleted the previous raid volume and partitions. I created a new raid volume (level 0 config this time) and reinstalled Windows. At this point, I've done nothing further. I'm currently deciding which backup program I should install as well as other software. I'd also like to add another 2 GB of RAM.

While I'm doing this, I should probably work on cleaning up the laptop - It's never been cleaned before. Laptops are a pain, though, since everything has to be taken apart just to reach certain areas. Would using the can of compressed air on the keyboard, in the panels underneath the laptop (RAM etc.) and through the vent where the fan is underneath the laptop suffice?

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 30 December 2011 - 06:06 PM.

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#88
rshaffer61

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When using canned air on a laptop always make sure you blow from the inside out. Do not blow from the outside in at the vents because you only force the dust inside.
If you have something like a pc vacuum you could use that.
With the new installation of windows is the laptop now booting into windows with no problem?
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#89
Sode no Shirayuki

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I reinstalled Windows on the desktop only and, yeah, it boots into Windows just fine now.

The raid volume's status is 'normal' and the error messages that are displayed in the following image no longer appear.

http://www.bild.me/b...33untitled2.JPG

I can't say for sure if the colored lines have been fixed. They aren't there now but I haven't installed the NVIDIA driver. The colored lines have always disappeared after uninstalling the driver so it's too soon to tell.

I just can't see how there could be anything wrong with the video card itself if the colored lines only appear when the NVIDIA driver is installed. Though, I don't know too much about these things.

-----

I guess I can press a vacuum cleaner's hose up against the vent on the back of the laptop to suck out the dust. Then, I can use the can of compressed air on the keyboard as well as in the panels on the back of the computer.

Edited by Sode no Shirayuki, 30 December 2011 - 10:12 PM.

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#90
rshaffer61

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It sounds to me like the Newest driver for the video is the issue here. Are you using the generic driver for the card and does it give you the correct resolutions for your system?
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