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Over heated & burnt CPU


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#1
PC Genie

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I think that my CPU finally burnt out. I posted a query several months ago and got advice on my CPU overheating and now my computer won't even boot. This is probably from having too much paste on my CPU, even though the paste did not run off the CPU onto any circuits. My question now is "Should I just purchase a new CPU or should I replace the motherboard too?" Since the paste did not spread off of the CPU, is there still damage to the motherboard?
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#2
Digerati

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If you replace the motherboard, unless you get the exact same make and model number (or the maker's suggested replacement if the original is no longer available) the replacement will be considered an "upgrade" and as such, will most likely require you purchase a new Windows license. Also, the new motherboard will likely support different RAM so you would need to replace that too.

As for your TIM (thermal interface material) issue, while certainly too much TIM is actually hampers heat transfer, that alone will not destroy a CPU. The temps would have to run exeedingly "warm" (not hot) for extended periods to prematurely age the CPU. If "hot" the CPU would have shut down to self-protect. What were your temps before this happened?

There are many many things that keep a computer from booting. At what point in the boot process does it fail?
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#3
PC Genie

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At what point in the boot process does it fail?


One evening I was using the computer and everything was working fine and then I shut it off. The next day I turned it on and nothing worked. I haven't got a clue of what went wrong. I purchased a new case with a water cooler for the CPU, installed everything in the new case and re-pasted the CPU. Still the computer wouldn't boot. I saw videos on YouTube warning of putting too much paste on the CPU, so I though that might be the problem.

I have no idea what to do. When it starts to boot, the fans turn on and it sounds like something is going to happen; then it goes silent. Sometimes it tries to cycle through a start up and then goes silent. Now after the first attempt of a start up, it doesn't do anything. It just remains silent.

Edited by PC Genie, 25 December 2011 - 11:55 AM.

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#4
Digerati

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So it failed and you tried to fix it by replacing the OEM cooler with a new water cooler? Why? Was the old cooler/fan not working?

Note on many motherboards, if the fan stops or is not connected, the motherboard /chipset halt the boot process so the CPU will not over heat.

If me, I would swap in a known good power supply and see what happens.
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#5
PC Genie

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So it failed and you tried to fix it by replacing the OEM cooler with a new water cooler? Why? Was the old cooler/fan not working?

If me, I would swap in a known good power supply and see what happens.


The OEM fan was blowing air, but I don't know if it was cool enough. In my previous request for help, I was advised that my CPU was hot. I used the free utilities to get the fan speed and the CPU temperature. So to be on the safe side, I installed a CPU hydro cooler. I also installed a new PSU rated at 1200 watts to be sure that I had enough power for the new cooler, the new 128 Gb SSD and other devices that I plan on adding later.
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#6
Digerati

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Well 1200W is usually way overkill for just about any system - even those running with 2 or more graphics cards. But having more than you need does no harm, except to your wallet as rshaffer61 noted to you here. If this is a continuation of that problem, then I would suspect your CPU is failing or a component on the motherboard itself if failing.
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#7
PC Genie

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If this is a continuation of that problem, then I would suspect your CPU is failing or a component on the motherboard itself if failing.


So you found my previous help request. http://www.geekstogo...36#entry2053636 That's all the data that I have about my PC, since its current condition won't be providing any readouts. Since my experience with computers doesn't include electronic diagnosis, I'm left with replacing the motherboard. I don't have any other way of diagnosing the problem unless you can tell me how to do it. Do you think that my SSD, my 24 Gb RAM and other devices can still be used or would they get damaged too?

I have to find a quality 1366 motherboard to keep using my 24 Gb DDR3 RAM. The new 1155 motherboards only have 4 RAM slots and I can only use 4 out of the 6 RAM cards that I currently have. Also I also have to find another Core i7 936 CPU. Even though its an "older" motherboard, it still had good speed. Otherwise, I'm wasting some of the RAM that I recently purchased on sale.
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#8
Digerati

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Have your tried running with just one stick of RAM at a time? I would try that before buying any more hardware. If this is new RAM, that may be your problem.

Your SSD is probably fine. You could install it in the machine you are using now as a secondary drive to find out. There is no way of testing the CPU or motherboard without trying a spare CPU or taking it to a shop.

I assume your ambient temps are no longer anywhere near 109°F but the damage may have already been done. A general rule of thumb with electronics is it like to be operated in environments are are considered comfortable for people - that it, "normal" room temperatures.

The new 1155 motherboards only have 4 RAM slots

If you are suggesting older 1155 boards supported 6 slots, I am about 99.9% sure 1155 boards never did and that makes sense - 1155 supports dual channel, not triple. And triple-channel has proven to be a flop - or at least offers no advantage.

Understand that you most likely will need a new Windows license with your new motherboard unless you buy an exact replacement, or the maker's recommended replacement if the original is no longer in production.
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#9
PC Genie

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Have your tried running with just one stick of RAM at a time? I would try that before buying any more hardware. If this is new RAM, that may be your problem.


I'll try that. I did, however, re-install the 3 RAM cards that I had prior to purchasing the 24 Gb set and nothing improved.

I assume your ambient temps are no longer anywhere near 109°F but the damage may have already been done. A general rule of thumb with electronics is it like to be operated in environments are are considered comfortable for people - that it, "normal" room temperatures.


We had a pretty hot summer, but now the ambient temperature is much cooler.

If you are suggesting older 1155 boards supported 6 slots, I am about 99.9% sure 1155 boards never did and that makes sense - 1155 supports dual channel, not triple. And triple-channel has proven to be a flop - or at least offers no advantage.


I meant to say that the 1366 motherboards have 6 RAM slots and the new 1155 have 4 RAM slots. A computer salesman told me that I can still use 4 of my new DDR3 RAM cards in the 1155 motherboard. That leaves me with 2 DDR3 RAM cards to keep as extras. These 4 cards will give me only 16 Gb of memory in the 1155 motherboard.

Understand that you most likely will need a new Windows license with your new motherboard unless you buy an exact replacement, or the maker's recommended replacement if the original is no longer in.


I'm not sure if I need to do that. I've had viruses on my computer and I had to re-install my Windows and I did an online activation. This has happened a couple of times. Now I usually make a HD image with Acronis and re-install the image as needed. Acronis makes its own hidden partition to save the image and I can re-install my OS by pressing f11 at bootup. This is like what the new laptops do.

Edited by PC Genie, 26 December 2011 - 10:18 AM.

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#10
Digerati

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I'm not sure if I need to do that. I've had viruses on my computer and I had to re-install my Windows and I did an online activation. This has happened a couple of times. Now I usually make a HD image with Acronis and re-install the image as needed. Acronis makes its own hidden partition to save the image and I can re-install my OS by pressing f11 at bootup. This is like what the new laptops do.

Reinstalling Windows on the same computer/motherboard has no licensing issues. Note my comment was specifically about a "new" motherboard. And it has nothing to do with activation or being technically able to install it, it is all about being legal. It is illegal to install an OEM license that was purchased for or came with an old computer on a new computer (or motherboard). If the install disk says OEM/System Builder, Upgrade, Academic Edition, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", then it is not legally transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". Therefore, if your disk is OEM, you will need to buy a new license to be legal, or use one of the many capable and free Linux alternative.
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#11
PC Genie

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I see what you mean.
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