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First PC Build - need reassurance that components are compatible


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#1
Zumio

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Hello community,

Firstly, Merry Christmas!

I will be undertaking my first PC build just after New Year - I'm at the phase where I've more or less decided exactly what components I want, but I really just need reassurance that they will all work when put together as a system. I have read through the threads here and am quite confident that the actual building will be fine (the sticky with pictured explanations of the step-by-step build process was brilliant). As I have literally worked my butt off this last half of the year to afford this computer (I'm a humble waiter/uni student) I don't really want to risk buying a component then realizing it isn't compatible with the other stuff I've bought.

Here's the list so far:

Motherboard: http://www.overclock...rodid=MB-183-MS

CPU: http://www.overclock...rodid=CP-368-IN

PSU: http://www.overclock...rodid=CA-001-XF

RAM: http://www.overclock...rodid=MY-292-CS

HDD: http://www.overclock...rodid=HD-252-SE

CPU Heatsink & Fan: http://www.overclock...rodid=HS-035-AR

DVD Drive: http://www.overclock...rodid=CD-099-SA

Case: http://www.overclock...catid=7&subcat=

Monitor: http://www.overclock...rodid=MO-028-AS

Now you may note that I have not included a graphics card in my list - this is because I want to wait until January 9th when the new ATI 79xx series comes out, I'm going to buy the 7950. A little more information can be found on this card here: http://en.wikipedia...._7xxx.29_series . It says the bus interface is PCIe-3 and I believe the motherboard I have chosen has 2 of these. My friend will lend me his old graphics card (ATI 4850 iirc) until then.

Also, I already have the case, as it was bought for me for my birthday a few months ago. I can afford to spend a little bit more ($250 US dollars max) so if there is anything that could be upgraded for a massive performance increase please let me know. I was also wondering whether I would need to buy any extra cables - a guy in my local computer shop said I might need a 4 pin to 6 pin molex adapter, not going to lie, im not entirely sure what one of these is. If you think I may need any of these please let me know!

I appreciate any feedback, really looking forward to building this!

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year all,

Zumio
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#2
phillpower2

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:welcome: Zumio
Just added a bit of guidance beneath some components for you;

Hello community,

Firstly, Merry Christmas!

I will be undertaking my first PC build just after New Year - I'm at the phase where I've more or less decided exactly what components I want, but I really just need reassurance that they will all work when put together as a system. I have read through the threads here and am quite confident that the actual building will be fine (the sticky with pictured explanations of the step-by-step build process was brilliant). As I have literally worked my butt off this last half of the year to afford this computer (I'm a humble waiter/uni student) I don't really want to risk buying a component then realizing it isn't compatible with the other stuff I've bought.

Here's the list so far:

Motherboard: http://www.overclock...rodid=MB-183-MS

CPU: http://www.overclock...rodid=CP-368-IN

PSU: http://www.overclock...rodid=CA-001-XF
I believe XFX PSUs are an improving brand but when it comes to a new and expensive build I would recommend a brand with a proven track record such as Antec, Corsair or Seasonic, see http://www.10stripe....d/psu/brand.php for PSUs to trust and PSUs to avoid, modular PSUs are more expensive and unnecessary when you have such a spacious case as the Antec 1200, good cable management is all that is required and lastly never decide on a PSU until all other components are decided upon or you could end up being under powered, use a PSU calculator such as; http://www2.corsair.com/psufinder/ (example only) to ensure you will have enough clean and stable power with at least an 80% efficiency rating.

RAM: http://www.overclock...rodid=MY-292-CS
Stick to Ram that is listed as compatible, use the MBs QVL (qualified vendors list) if one is available to ensure you purchase Ram that has been tested and approved by the MB manufacture, the Ram specified for your MB is the following DDR3 1066/1333/1600*/2133*(OC) your proposed Ram will apparently work but offers very little to your build see http://forums.overcl....php?t=18347917

HDD: http://www.overclock...rodid=HD-252-SE
Consider adding a SSD for your OS** to speed up boot times http://www.overclock...id=2104&subcat=

CPU Heatsink & Fan: http://www.overclock...rodid=HS-035-AR

DVD Drive: http://www.overclock...rodid=CD-099-SA

Case: http://www.overclock...catid=7&subcat=

Monitor: http://www.overclock...rodid=MO-028-AS

Now you may note that I have not included a graphics card in my list - this is because I want to wait until January 9th when the new ATI 79xx series comes out, I'm going to buy the 7950. A little more information can be found on this card here: http://en.wikipedia...._7xxx.29_series . It says the bus interface is PCIe-3 and I believe the motherboard I have chosen has 2 of these. My friend will lend me his old graphics card (ATI 4850 iirc) until then.

Also, I already have the case, as it was bought for me for my birthday a few months ago. I can afford to spend a little bit more ($250 US dollars max) so if there is anything that could be upgraded for a massive performance increase please let me know. I was also wondering whether I would need to buy any extra cables - a guy in my local computer shop said I might need a 4 pin to 6 pin molex adapter, not going to lie, im not entirely sure what one of these is. If you think I may need any of these please let me know!

I appreciate any feedback, really looking forward to building this!

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year all,

Zumio


Some additional points, you have not listed an OS**, Windows 7 64-bit is recommended if you have 8GB of Ram, you will need to purchase some TIM (thermal interface material) such as Arctic Silver5 for your CPU and heatsink, see the tutorial provided courtesy of Digerati @ http://www.geekstogo...rface-material/ also a keyboard and mouse are not listed.

I am not sure why the guy at the store said you may need a 4 pin molex to 6 pin pci-e adapter, these are often used if the video card requires two of these but only one is available, you havn`t settled on a card yet so the suggestion is puzzling :confused: this is also another reason you must be careful when choosing a PSU as you do not yet know what the minimum power output a new video card requires, one final point regarding modular PSUs, there is always the danger of misplacing unused cables which are near impossible to replace.

Like I have said the above is guidance and if you have any questions please ask away :thumbsup:
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#3
iammykyl

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Gday

Zumio,

Posted Image.

It says the bus interface is PCIe-3 and I believe the motherboard I have chosen has 2 of these.

This is my understanding to date.

Correct,, BUT, The ability to use PCI-E 3.0 is contained and controlled in and by the CPU.

Sandy Bridge does not have this feature. You will have to use a Ivy Bridge CPU.

Info, MSI. read this bit, WORLD’S 1ST PCI EXPRESS GEN 3 MAINBOARD BRAND http://www.newegg.co...N82E16813130611

Further, Asrock, How to identify the correct ic. Read from

Next-Gen PCI-E 3.0 Support,

http://www.asrock.co...ofessional Gen3

Ivy Bridge not due out to 2nd qtr 2012 Some info, you will need to do more research, http://gizmodo.com/5...lease-date-leak
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#4
Zumio

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Thanks for the replies!

Iammykyl: So I will not be able to use the ATI Radeon HD 7950 (out 9th Jan) with my build? It seems a bit weird that you won't be able to use this graphics card until Q2 2012 when the Ivy Bridge processors are out.... are you sure that's right? Just doesn't seem logical that ATI would release an unusable graphics card. Thanks for the info on that. I'll have to do some research. From the material you linked it looks as if I will be able to use the new graphics card with the Sandybridge processor, just that it Will run at Gen 2 speed (seems to be backwards compatible). Is this right?

Phillpower2: Thanks very much, I didn't think it would be necessary to include these components but you are right, always better to be concise. I'll be using Windows Home Premium 64-bit, and I've bought some thermal paste. I also have a keyboard and mouse. I do agree that it could be tricky as I don't know how much power the new card will require - however I did run my system through a power supply calculator that someone linked in these forums. Set it to 100% peak load and it said I would need around 650W PSU. Chose a 750W so I have a bit of breathing room. You reckon it will be ok?

Thanks again!
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#5
Digerati

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I think the problem is not with all Sandy Bridge CPUs, just the new Sandy Bridge-E. See here.


[quotename='Zumio']It says the bus interface is PCIe-3 and I believe the motherboard I have chosen has 2 of these[/quote]
I don't see anything on the MSI Z68A-GD65 Specs Page about PCIe 3.0. Also note on that page the warning about choosing a CPU from the compatible CPU list (yours is listed).

Also, you may not be aware, and for many enthusiasts it is not a concern, but it is important all readers understand that both Intel and AMD warranty their “retail” boxed versions of their CPUs that come with supplied heatsink fan assemblies as “a unit". Consequently, both Intel and AMD require the use of the supplied coolers with their CPUs and using any alternative cooling solution violates the terms of the CPU warranties. Note this IS stated in the CPU warranty booklets that come with each CPU, or can be viewed online at Intel and AMD.
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#6
Zumio

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[quote name='Digerati' timestamp='1324823265' post='2099065']
I think the problem is not with all Sandy Bridge CPUs, just the new Sandy Bridge-E. See here.


[quotename='Zumio']It says the bus interface is PCIe-3 and I believe the motherboard I have chosen has 2 of these[/quote]
I don't see anything on the MSI Z68A-GD65 Specs Page about PCIe 3.0. Also note on that page the warning about choosing a CPU from the compatible CPU list (yours is listed).

Also, you may not be aware, and for many enthusiasts it is not a concern, but it is important all readers understand that both Intel and AMD warranty their “retail” boxed versions of their CPUs that come with supplied heatsink fan assemblies as “a unit". Consequently, both Intel and AMD require the use of the supplied coolers with their CPUs and using any alternative cooling solution violates the terms of the CPU warranties. Note this IS stated in the CPU warranty booklets that come with each CPU, or can be viewed online at Intel and AMD.
[/quote]

Thanks for your reply,

Interesting reads.

From what I gather, I will be able to buy the ATI Radeon HD 7950 card when it comes out on 9th Jan (It connects via PCIe 3.0 x16), but it will run at PCI-Gen2 speed (the speed we are all using now). I'm not sure how much of an issue this will be - surely it will still be fine (considering we are fine to run most games on ultra using PCI-Gen2 at the moment). I got a bit confused with the PCIe 3.0 - perhaps the motherboard doesn't have them, I thought the PCIe 16x slots were the 3.0 slots.

That is very interesting about the warranties. Does the fact that I am buying an OEM processor rather than the retail version make any difference? Surely these stock heatsink/fans are not really all that brilliant compared to the one that I have chosen for my build.

Please point me out if I'm wrong on anything - you guys are much more knowledgeable than I am. I've learned quite a bit already!

Zumio

Edited by Zumio, 25 December 2011 - 08:55 AM.

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#7
Digerati

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I thought the PCIe 16x slots were the 3.0 slots.

Again, I don't see that listed in the specs. If they were 3.0, I would think MSI's marketing weenies would have that fact plastered everywhere.

That is very interesting about the warranties. Does the fact that I am buying an OEM processor rather than the retail version make any difference?

Yes it does make a difference and I apologize for not seeing that you selected an OEM verion before. OEM CPUs typically do not come with supplied HSF assemblies so you are expected to supply your own HSF assembly. The other big difference is OEM CPUs are warrantied for 1 year while retail CPUs with OEM HSF assemblies are warrantied for 3 years.

Surely these stock heatsink/fans are not really all that brilliant compared to the one that I have chosen for my build.

On the contrary, because the OEM HSF assemblies are expected to provide cooling for the entire 3 year warranty period, and because neither Intel or AMD want to replace the CPU or HSF assembly under warranty, they provide excellent coolers that are fully capable of providing years of good cooling, even with moderate overclocking. Remember, the purpose of the CPU cooler is to help remove heat from the CPU and toss it up into the case. It is the case's responsibility to provide adequate cool air into the case and to extract hot air from it. Thus the case MUST provide good front-to-back flow through the case cavity.

One of the traditional advantages of aftermarket coolers is they tend to be quieter. But both Intel and AMD have addressed that too. Note this Intel OEM Cooling Solution is no pushover.

Also note that motherboard designers intentionally cluster heat generating and heat sensitive devices around the CPU socket so they too can take advantage of the turbulence created by the expected OEM HSF. The HSF you have selected blows sideways. While I am sure it provides excellent cooling for the CPU, it might not for the surrounding devices as the downward blowing OEM fan might. So make sure your case is providing adequate cooling. I generally like at least one large (≥ 120mm) fan in front drawing cool air in and at least one large fan in back (excluding the PSU fan) exhausting heated air out.

If me, unless planning on doing some extreme overclocking, I would go full retail with a supplied OEM cooler and have a CPU that is warrantied for 3 years.
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#8
phillpower2

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Some info on the card http://www.overclock...price-at-launch

Surprising that only a 500W PSU is recommended by AMD, do note however the 8 pin and the 6 pin power connections required see the system requirements tab http://www.amd.com/u...eon-7970.aspx#2

Regarding the CPU warranty, interestingly enough out of curiosity I have searched online for a genuine Intel branded stock HS and fan for the CPU but have yet to find one.

See the feedback tab @ http://www.newegg.co...eywords)&Page=1 any complaints in the main are to do with the poor quality HS and fan and many have voided their warranty by swapping out the CPU cooler.

Intel guidance regarding OEM CPU warranties;

What is an OEM or tray processor and how long is the warranty on the processor?
An OEM / tray processor is one that is sold wholesale, typically in bulk quantities, to system manufacturers like HP*, Dell*, or Acer*. These processors are usually sold in a tray format and integrated by the OEM or reseller into a PC. The OEM processor warranty length is set by the individual vendor and warranty services are provided by the vendor. We recommend that you consult the warranty documentation that came with your system to find your warranty terms and conditions.
Full article http://www.intel.com...CS-032344.htm#2

Just to add personally I am not a fan of overclocking and would much rather have a stock cooler and a 3 year warranty.
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#9
Zumio

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Also note that motherboard designers intentionally cluster heat generating and heat sensitive devices around the CPU socket so they too can take advantage of the turbulence created by the expected OEM HSF. The HSF you have selected blows sideways. While I am sure it provides excellent cooling for the CPU, it might not for the surrounding devices as the downward blowing OEM fan might. So make sure your case is providing adequate cooling. I generally like at least one large (≥ 120mm) fan in front drawing cool air in and at least one large fan in back (excluding the PSU fan) exhausting heated air out.

If me, unless planning on doing some extreme overclocking, I would go full retail with a supplied OEM cooler and have a CPU that is warrantied for 3 years.


Thanks for that, that's great. I'll be sure to do that.

Do you think the graphics card (ATI Radeon 7950 HD) is compatible with my motherboard/CPU? The bus interface seems to be unanimous throughout the whole 79xx series - "PCIe 3.0 x16". This seems to be the only issue I am facing at the moment.

Thanks for the pointer, great help.
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#10
Digerati

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[quote]Regarding the CPU warranty, interestingly enough out of curiosity I have searched online for a genuine Intel branded stock HS and fan for the CPU but have yet to find one.[/quote]I did too. I even searched the Intel Store and you cannot buy them directly from Intel either.

[quote]See the feedback tab @ http://www.newegg.co.....words)&Page=1 any complaints in the main are to do with the poor quality HS and fan and many have voided their warranty by swapping out the CPU cooler.[/quote]Hmmm, did I miss something? I don't see any complaints. One comment about the stock cooler but nothing specific. In fact, there were a couple good comments about the stock cooler.

[quotename='Zumio"]Do you think the graphics card (ATI Radeon 7950 HD) is compatible with my motherboard/CPU? [/quote]The motherboard? Yes. The CPU? Doesn't matter. If the motherboard supports the CPU, and the motherboard supports the card, it is up to the chipset and OS to make them work together.
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#11
Zumio

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Some info on the card http://www.overclock...price-at-launch

Surprising that only a 500W PSU is recommended by AMD, do note however the 8 pin and the 6 pin power connections required see the system requirements tab http://www.amd.com/u...eon-7970.aspx#2

Regarding the CPU warranty, interestingly enough out of curiosity I have searched online for a genuine Intel branded stock HS and fan for the CPU but have yet to find one.

See the feedback tab @ http://www.newegg.co...eywords)&Page=1 any complaints in the main are to do with the poor quality HS and fan and many have voided their warranty by swapping out the CPU cooler.

Intel guidance regarding OEM CPU warranties;

What is an OEM or tray processor and how long is the warranty on the processor?
An OEM / tray processor is one that is sold wholesale, typically in bulk quantities, to system manufacturers like HP*, Dell*, or Acer*. These processors are usually sold in a tray format and integrated by the OEM or reseller into a PC. The OEM processor warranty length is set by the individual vendor and warranty services are provided by the vendor. We recommend that you consult the warranty documentation that came with your system to find your warranty terms and conditions.
Full article http://www.intel.com...CS-032344.htm#2

Just to add personally I am not a fan of overclocking and would much rather have a stock cooler and a 3 year warranty.


Thanks very much for another post.

That link on the graphics card is great, its good to have some extra info.

I checked out the page on the graphics card - it says that the PSU requirements are "500W (or greater) power supply with one 150W 8-pin PCI Express power connector and one 75W 6-pin PCI Express power connector recommended." From what I can gather the PSU that I have chosen (http://www.overclock...rodid=CA-001-XF) is capable of this.... however do you think I'll need extra cabling to accomodate the graphics card? Or will the PSU/card come with additional cabling? I took a look on the cabling section of the website I am using to purchase the components (http://www.overclock...hp?groupid=1929) couldnt find any "150W 8-pin PCI Express power connector" cables or "75W 6-pin PCI Express power connector".... or is it talking about the actual ports on the PSU rather than the cables? If so, are the connections on the PSU set in terms of voltage or does the component tell the PSU what voltage is required, and it gives that voltage?

Thanks for feedback, sorry if what I say is a bit confusing.

Zumio
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#12
Zumio

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[quote name='Digerati' timestamp='1324829179' post='2099089']
[quotename='Zumio"]Do you think the graphics card (ATI Radeon 7950 HD) is compatible with my motherboard/CPU? [/quote]The motherboard? Yes. The CPU? Doesn't matter. If the motherboard supports the CPU, and the motherboard supports the card, it is up to the chipset and OS to make them work together.[/quote]
[/quote]

Thank you very much!

Looks like I am all set for my graphics card then.... just need to work out whether my PSU is good enough/has the required connectors for my build. I think I will also just go with the retail version of the processor, and use the stock Heatsink/Fan. Thanks for the explanation about the clustering of heat-related components around the CPU socket. It will also save me a few pounds too. One question though - I have changed the CPU to "http://www.overclock...odid=CP-360-IN" (The retail version rather than OEM). This will come with the Stock HSF right? I assume so (15 pound price increase)

Getting there!

Zumio

Edited by Zumio, 25 December 2011 - 10:15 AM.

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#13
phillpower2

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Hey Zumio did you miss this http://www.overclock...id=1660&subcat= Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 1TB SATA 6Gb/s 32MB Cache same cost as your proposed Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB SATA 6Gb/s 16MB Cache

Below are examples, I do appreciate that you can`t please every one by the way and some people are overly critical.

Cons: what cons? well maybe the stock fan but that's why i bought an 212evo
Cons: Intel please stop selling your CPU with the stock CPU coolers. I throw them in the trash, brand new. I only need the CPU. You could knock $10.00 off the price and save the land fill.
Cons: Intel's manual blows. Mine came with a defective fan, so it isn't keeping it cool at 100% load. It even shut down once at 99°C.
Cons: The stock HSF looks cheap, any OC enthusiast knows to get aftermarket, why they even bother including one is beyond me, probably to squeeze an extra $10-20 out of us.
Cons: Instead of a heatsink, you get this funny little paperweight. It works fine if you're not overclocking, but if you do plan to OC, throw that little hunk of tin at your neighbors yapping dog. Don't worry about hurting the dog, the tin lump is much too light to hurt anything.
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#14
Digerati

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Okay, some of those were on later pages so my mistake - I saw that Page 1 and stopped there. But still, as far as the CPU coming with a defective fan - until Man can create perfection 100% of the time, there will always be some lemons. I note as Corsair PSUs get more and more popular, I keep seeing examples of failed ones too.

"maybe the stock fan"
"looks cheap"

Hardly descriptive of actual problems. Most of those aftermarket cooler users didn't even try the OEM coolers to see how they performed first, but clearly based their comments on biases. Note the many comments that say "all stock fans are bad". That's just not true. Again, neither Intel nor AMD want to replace a CPU or fan due to the fan failing. There were many comments from folks who got good temps with no mention of replacing the cooler. And as I noted before, the case plays a major role in cooling and we know nothing about how these systems were cooled, ambient temps or anything else. A main reason to always take user reviews with a grain of salt.

Also said were these Pros:
  • Another surprise was that the stock cooler for this CPU keeps temps nice and low
  • Fantastic overclocking capabilities, even with the stock heat sink.
  • A wonderful, amazing processor! It has coped with everything I have thrown at it so far which is mostly computer games. It stays amazingly cool too!
  • When its under tremendous load ( as in 100% using Prime 95) it runs about 30 to 40 degrees with the orginal stock cooler
  • Gaming performance is much better than with the 965, and with the stock cooler, the fan is nearly silent at range. Idle CPU temp with my Phenom II was about 56C. This CPU ranges 28-30C on idle with stock fan and paste.
  • The Stock Fan is effective. Idles at 23C

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#15
phillpower2

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:surrender:
As I said previously , I do appreciate that you can`t please every one by the way and some people are overly critical, to be fair there are not a lot of complaints it was just that the cooler was mentioned more than anything else Con wise, there are also as I mentioned earlier many who have voided their warranty by fitting an after market cooler thus not even giving the stock cooler a chance, as many will know CPU coolers are tested over and above their normal operating temps and it is mainly O/Cing that causes an adverse affect.
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