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What is L2 Cache?


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#1
Faizan Ern Prince

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Can someone please explain what is meant by L2 Cache?
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#2
Digerati

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Remember, Google is your friend.

What is L2 Cache?
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#3
Faizan Ern Prince

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I have already checked on Google but is not clear.
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#4
Digerati

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Then please tell us what part you don't understand. Caches are fast memory used to temporarily store frequently used data that can be retrieved quickly. L2 or level 2 cache may be located on the same die (computer "chip) as the processor (CPU) or on a separate chip on the motherboard.
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#5
Neil Jones

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Cache is the fast memory that stores data that is, or was, frequently requested.

A "real world" picture could be painted as thus:

Think of the bedroom. The wardrobe is the processor, the floor is your cache.
You want something out the wardrobe. You get it, don't like it and throw it on the floor. You get something else out the wardrobe and then decide to go back to the original item. Instead of going back into the wardrobe you go to the floor which is a faster way of getting it.

Likewise, data instructions come from the "wardrobe" and end up on the "floor". If something else wants the same piece of data, it's easier to get it off the floor as opposed to empty the wardrobe again.
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#6
Faizan Ern Prince

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Cache is the fast memory that stores data that is, or was, frequently requested.

A "real world" picture could be painted as thus:

Think of the bedroom. The wardrobe is the processor, the floor is your cache.
You want something out the wardrobe. You get it, don't like it and throw it on the floor. You get something else out the wardrobe and then decide to go back to the original item. Instead of going back into the wardrobe you go to the floor which is a faster way of getting it.

Likewise, data instructions come from the "wardrobe" and end up on the "floor". If something else wants the same piece of data, it's easier to get it off the floor as opposed to empty the wardrobe again.


Thanks :)
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#7
Faizan Ern Prince

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Then please tell us what part you don't understand. Caches are fast memory used to temporarily store frequently used data that can be retrieved quickly. L2 or level 2 cache may be located on the same die (computer "chip) as the processor (CPU) or on a separate chip on the motherboard.


Thanks :)
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#8
Digerati

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Bottom line - cache is a good thing, and normally, the bigger the better.
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