Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

external video card on laptops for gaming?


  • Please log in to reply

#1
weldon49

weldon49

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
I have an intel pentium® dual-core T4500 @2.30 ghz, 4gigs RAM with a horrible mobile intel® 4 series express chipset family video card. I understand laptops are not meant for gaming but i would like to know how external graphics cards work and how well they can hold up to new games like call of duty mw2. I meet all of the sytem requirements except for that annoying video card. From what i understand i can buy a external video card and plug it in through the USB port and "override" the internal graphics card. if this is true it also seems that i have to also have an external monitor and i cannot use the one.... you know attached to my laptop haha. So my question is how do they work, can i get one that i plug in and play games like normally on my laptop, and *cross my fingers* is there finally a way i can just get my internal video card just replaced with a better gaming card?

Edited by weldon49, 28 December 2011 - 10:54 PM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
USB (even the new USB 3.0) does not have the necessary bandwidth for gaming graphics. The internal graphics interface/bus (whether PCI, AGP, or PCIe) of your current integrated graphics solution is much faster than any USB technology. So these external graphics cards are best suited for adding monitors for presentations - not for gaming.
  • 0

#3
weldon49

weldon49

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
ok thanks for the information. so there really is no way to change my graphics card since its like built into my laptop?
  • 0

#4
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

so there really is no way to change my graphics card since its like built into my laptop?

It depends on the notebook. The vast majority of notebooks use motherboards with integrated graphics solutions and there is no way and no room to upgrade or add a card. There are some high-end notebooks that use graphics cards that can be upgraded (if the notebook maker has one) but those notebooks are rare, and expensive.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP